Leaves from the Backwoods

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J. Lovell, 1861 - Canadian poetry - 174 pages
 

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Page 43 - Rest comes sure and soon : Give every flying minute Something to keep in store : Work, for the night is coming, When man works no more. 3 Work, for the night is coming, Under the sunset skies; While their bright tints are glowing, Work, for daylight flies : Work, till the last beam fadeth, Fadeth to shine no more : Work, while the night is darkening, When man's work is o'er.
Page 135 - ... go not back, when I depart, The scene thy bursting tears too deep will move, Where my dear father took thee to his heart, And Gertrude thought it...
Page 1 - Therefore I hope to join your seaside walk, Saddened, and mostly silent, with emotion ; Not interrupting with intrusive talk The grand, majestic symphonies of ocean. Therefore I hope, as no unwelcome guest, At your warm fireside, when the lamps are lighted, To have my place reserved among the rest, Nor stand as one unsought and uninvited ! BY THE SEASIDE.
Page 42 - WORK, for the night is coming, Work through the morning hours; Work while the dew is sparkling, Work 'mid springing flowers ; Work when the day grows brighter, Work in the glowing sun ; Work, for the night is coming, When man's work is done.
Page 55 - Thus while I ape the measure wild Of tales that charmed me yet a child, Rude though they be, still with the chime Return the thoughts of early time; And feelings, roused in life's first day, Glow in the line and prompt the lay.
Page 85 - PLEASANT it was, when woods were green, And winds were soft and low, To lie amid some sylvan scene, Where, the long drooping boughs between, Shadows dark and sunlight sheen Alternate come and go ; Or where the denser grove receives No sunlight from above, But the dark foliage interweaves In one unbroken roof of leaves, Underneath whose sloping eaves The shadows hardly move. Beneath some patriarchal tree I lay upon...
Page 141 - WHEN through life unblest we rove, Losing all that made life dear, Should some notes we used to love In days of boyhood meet our ear, Oh ! how welcome breathes the strain ! Wakening thoughts that long have slept ; Kindling former smiles again, In faded eyes that long have wept...
Page 147 - GOD ! accept; — accept thine own : My gifts are Thine, — be Thine alone The glory of my song. In earth and ocean, sky and air, All that is excellent and fair, Seen, felt, or understood, From one eternal cause descends, To one eternal centre tends, With God begins, continues, ends, The source and...
Page 160 - Let your angels' guardian host Keep all evil from our bed, Till the flood of morning rays "Wake us to a song of praise. THE LAMB IS THE LIGHT THEREOF. THE fairest light that ever shone In summer skies, The purest rays that ever flashed On mortal eyes, Shall be but as the dead of night To that eternal, glorious light That shall be given To those who, for a little space, Have bravely run the Christian race, And entered Heav'n. Sometimes a gleam of that pure light Is found below, In humble hearts that...
Page 20 - ... be attempting to press on our minds and affect their character, as if they retained with difficulty their shadows of existence,' and were continually on the point of vanishing into nothing? Why is this stupendous Intelligence so retired and silent, while present, over all the scenes of the earth, and in all the paths and abodes of men ? Why...

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