Pilgrim's Progress

Front Cover
Harper Collins, May 1, 2012 - Fiction - 370 pages

Published in 1678, John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress is one of the best-known Christian allegorical novels ever written. Believing deeply that he has led a sinful life, Christian undertakes a pilgrimage in search of the Celestial City. Throughout his journey, he faces personal trials, great danger, and experiences moments of joy during which he comes to understand the spiritual realm and his place in it.

Written during John Bunyan’s incarceration for preaching without a licence, The Pilgrim’s Progress has since been translated into more than two hundred languages and has never been out of print.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Gmomaj - LibraryThing

Often disguised as something that would help him, evil accompanies Christian on his journey to the Celestial City. As you walk with him, you’ll begin to identify today’s many religious pitfalls. These ... Read full review

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User Review  - The_Hibernator - LibraryThing

Summary: In this allegorical novel, a pilgrim named Christian travels a journey in which he loses the heavy weight of his sins, is tempted to sin again, and eventually reaches paradise. My thoughts: I ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

John Bunyan was an English Christian writer and preacher who is best known for his allegorical novel The Pilgrim’s Progress, published in 1678. Bunyan’s faith was profoundly influenced by two books owned by his wife: Arthur Dent's Plain Man's Pathway to Heaven and Lewis Bayly's Practice of Piety, and he turned to preaching following the death of his guide and mentor, John Gifford. The restoration of the monarchy of Charles II of England marked England’s return to Anglicanism, and Bunyan’s freedom to preach was curtailed. He was arrested numerous times for preaching without a licence, and was finally imprisoned for the offence in November 1660. Bunyan was released from prison in January 1672 and resumed preaching (as permitted under the Declaration of Religious Indulgence) until his death in 1688.

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