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SUPPLEMENT TO THE STANDARD GUIDE

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Showing at a glance the location of each artist's work. The numbers cor-
respond with those given to the apartments in the plans on the page facing
Section 1, and with the sections of the text where the description of each paint-
ing will be found.

Section. Artist,
Subject. Floor.

Location,
Adams Portrait busts

Portico
16 Adams Henry

Reading room
6 Adams Mantel*

First Senate reading room
2 Adams Minerva

First Vestibule
I Adams Writing

First Bronze door
7
Alexander Book

First Entrance pavilion east hall
13
Barse
Literature

Second Entrance pavilion east
16 Bartlett

Law Columbus,
Michael Angelo

Reading room
16 Baur

Religion,
Beethoven

Reading room
14

Benson Graces, Seasons Second Entrance pavilion south
16 Bissell Kent

Reading room
16 Blashfield

Civilization,
Understanding

Reading room dome
Boyd
Race heads

Window arches
Boyle Bacon, Plato

Reading room
3 Compass Points

First Central stair hall
Cox

Arts, Sciences Second Southwest pavilion
16 Dallin Newton

Reading room
6 Dielman Mosaic Mantels First Representatives' room
19 Dodge (RL) Elements

Second Southeast pavilion
21 Dodge (WL) Art, etc.

Second Northwest pavilion
Donoghue Science, St. Paul

Reading room
16 Dozzi Art

Reading room
Ellicott Race heads

Window arches
16 Flanagan Clock, Commerce

Reading room
16 French
History

Reading room
19
Garnsey Elements

Second Southeast pavilion
* By Adams, after designs by Casey. See note on next page.

16

17

16

-

{

Section, Artist. Subject.

Floor.

Location. 20 Garnsey Seals

Second Northeast pavilion 6 Gutherz Lights

First Representatives' room
Hartley Portrait busts

Portico
Holslag Literature

First

Librarian's room
McEwen Greek Heroes First South curtain corridor
Mackay Fates

Second Entrance pavilion east
Mackey Ceiling Panels First Senate reading room
I Macmon'ies Printing

First Bronze door 16 Macmon'ies Shakespeare

Reading room 3 Martin Flying genii

Stair hall ceiling 3 Martiny Sculptures

First Central stair hall 16 Martiny Sculptures

Reading room dome 18 Maynard Discoverers Second Southwest pavilion 12-14 Maynard Virtues

Second Entrance pavilion N. and S. 22 Melchers Peace, War Second Northwest gallery 6 Niehaus Door-heads

First Representatives' room 16 Niehaus Moses, Gibbon

Reading room 16 Pearce Family

First North hall
Perry
Fountain

West approach 12-14 Perry Sibyls

Second Entrance pavilion N. and S. 16 Potter Fulton

Reading room
Pratt
Literature, etc.

Arches of entrance 16 Pratt Philosophy

Reading room 18 Pratt

Seasons

Second Corner pavilions 12, 23 Printers' Marks

Second Entrance pavilion I2 Reid

Knowledge, etc. Second Entrance pavilion north I2 Reid

Senses

Second Entrance pavilion north
Ruckstuhl Portrait Busts

Portico 16 Ruckstuhl Solon

Reading room 16 St. Gaudens Art, Homer

Reading room
Schlader-

State Arms
mundt

Reading room windows 15 Shirlaw Sciences

Second Entrance pavilion west II Simmons Muses

First North curtain corridor

s Il Penseroso 13

Second Entrance pavil'n near elevator 15 Van Ingen Painting, etc. Second Entrance pavilion west 20 Van Ingen Seals

Second Northeast pavilion 8 Vedder Government First Reading room lobby 13 Vedder Minerva

Second Stairway to gallery. 4 Walker Poetry

First South hall 16 Ward Poetry

Reading 100m 3 Warner Students

First Central stair hall I

Warner Tradition, Writing First Bronze doors 3 Weinert Eagles

Stair hall, upper arcade 16 Weinert Female figures

Reading room

Van Ingen {L'Allegro

MR. PAUL J. Pelz designed the principal lines of the interior of the Dome, including the marble work of the Rotunda. In 1892 Mr. EDWARD PEARCE Casey, of New York, was employed as architect, and adviser and supervisor in matters of art. Mr. Casey planned the general scheme of interior decoration and elaborated its details, and supervised the execution of the work to its successful completion. Thus the mantels in the Representatives' room, mantel and oak door-head in the Senate room, the rotunda frieze and stucco work and other ornamental sculpture, not otherwise noted, are from Mr. Casey's designs. Mr. E. E.. Garnsey designed the color schemes throughout,

HARV COLLEGE LIBRARY

THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.

T

HE need of a separate building for the Library of Congress

was first urged by Mr. Ainsworth R. Spofford, in his
Librarian's Report for 1872. In 1886 an appropriation

was made for the purchase of the site, which is a plot of ten acres, including three city blocks, on the plateau southeast of the Capitol. The grounds and the seventy residences upon them cost $585,000. The foundations were laid in 1888, and the build- Cost ing was begun in 1889, and was completed in the spring of 1897. The net cost of the building, exclusive of site, was $6,032,124.54.

The original architectural plans were prepared by the firm of Smithmeyer & Pelz. These were subsequently modified in various details by those of Edward Pearce Casey. The original act of Congress of 1886 provided for a commission to have charge of the work. In 1888 the commission was succeeded in the management by Brig.-Gen. Thos. Lincoln Casey, Chief of Engineers of the Army; the active superintendence being intrusted to Mr. Bernard R. Green. Upon General Casey's death in March, 1896, Mr. Green was, by joint resolution of Congress, appointed as his successor.

The memorial arch in the Entrance Pavilion bears the record :

ERECTED UNDER THE ACTS OF CONGRESS OF

APRIL 15 1886 OCTOBER 2 1888 AND MARCH 2 1889 BY

BRIG GEN THOS LINCOLN CASEY

CHIEF OF ENGINEERS U 8 A

BERNARD R GREEN GUPT AND ENGINEER

JOHN L SMITHMEYER ARCHITECT

PAUL J PELZ ARCHITECT
EDWARD PEARCE CASEY ARCHITECT

The Library grounds adjoin those of the Capitol. The building faces west upon First street, and the outer walls have a frontage upon four streets (First, East Capitol, Second and B streets); this, with the spacious courts and the great number of windows (nearly 2,000), renders it the best-lighted library in the world.

The building is of the Italian Renaissance order of architecture; it has three stories, with a dome; and is in area 470 X 340-ft., cov

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