The Works of the Late Miss Catherine Talbot, First Published by the Late Mrs. Elizabeth Carter: And Now Republished with Some Few Additional Papers, Together with Notes and Illustrations and Some Account of Her Life

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1819 - English literature - 363 pages
 

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Page 18 - Nevertheless, he left not himself without witness, in that he did good, and gave us rain from heaven, and fruitful seasons, filling our hearts with food and gladness.
Page 16 - Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not ; yea, the stars are not pure in his sight. How much less man, that is a worm? and the son of man, which is a worm?
Page 107 - Heav'n has no rage like love to hatred turn'd, Nor hell a fury like a woman scorn'd.
Page 33 - But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then saith he to the sick of the palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house.
Page 4 - To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak : I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.
Page 120 - The strength he gains is from th' embrace he gives. On their own axis as the planets run, Yet make at once their circle round the sun ; So two consistent motions act the soul; And one regards itself, and one the whole.
Page xxxi - Lord, thou hast searched me out, and known me : thou knowest my down-sitting, and mine up-rising; thou understandest my thoughts long before. Thou art about my path, and about my bed : and spiest out all my ways.
Page 191 - While low delights, succeeding fast behind, In happier meanness occupy the mind : As in those domes, where Caesars once bore sway, Defaced by time and tottering in decay, There in the ruin, heedless of the dead, The shelter-seeking peasant builds his shed ; And, wondering man could want the larger pile, Exults, and owns his cottage with a smile.
Page 26 - I find them irreclaimable, and myself in the least possible danger of being infected by their example — then to fly them as I would the plague ; then to cut off a right hand, and pluck out a right eye, and break through every fondness and every attachment that would destroy my highest, my eternal interest.
Page 222 - But the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God, and there shall no torment touch them. In the sight of the unwise they seemed to die: and their departure is taken for misery. And their going from us to be utter destruction: but they are in peace.

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