Zoology: Being a Systematic Account of the General Structure, Habits, Instincts, and Uses of the Principal Families of the Animal Kingdom, as Well as of the Chief Forms of Fossil Remains, Volume 1

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H. G. Bohn, 1857 - Animals - 588 pages
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Page 443 - Wren, is the smallest of our native birds ; its length from the tip of the beak to the end of the tail...
Page 16 - But what our eyes have seene and hands haue touched we shall declare. There is a small Island in Lancashire called the pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by Shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees cast up there likewise ; whereon is found a certain spume or froth that in time breedeth...
Page 321 - ... it will lift the piece, whilst the cattle and men pull it forwards. The African species is not at present tamed by Man, being pursued solely for its tusks ; but it was this which was for the most part employed by the ancient Romans. 288. A third species of Elephant, commonly known as the Mammoth, formerly existed in Northern Asia in great abundance ; as is proved by the vast number of tusks and bones which are found buried in the frozen soil of Siberia. The tusks form a regular article of commerce,...
Page 16 - But what our eyes have seen and our hands have touched" continues 'the Author, doubtless with full sincerity, " we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire called the Pile of Foulders...
Page 17 - ... the legs of the bird hanging out ; and, as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth only by the bill...
Page 17 - ... to the shape and form of a bird. When it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the...
Page 62 - ... which is a conscious violation of what is thought to be a natural law, but is not ; and an Objective Sin, a conscious violation of what is a natural law. In each case the integrity of consciousness is disturbed. So much for the definition of terms. There may be various Degrees of Error and of Sin. It is not easy to say where one begins and the other ends ; for in ethics as in all science, it is not easy to distinguish things by their circumferences, where they blend, but only by their centres,...
Page 137 - which constitutes the 'hand, properly so called, is the faculty of opposing the thumb to the other fingers, so as to seize upon the most minute objects — -a faculty which is carried to its highest degree of perfection in man, in whom the whole anterior extremity is free, and can be employed in prehension.
Page 270 - Pallas had tne patience to examine their provision of hay piece by piece, and found it to consist chiefly of the choicest grasses, and the sweetest herbs, all cut when most vigorous, and dried so slowly as to form a green and succulent fodder ; he found in it scarcely any ears, or blossoms, or hard and woody stems, but some mixture of bitter herbs, probably useful to render the rest more wholesome.

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