Innovation in Chinese Medicine

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Elisabeth Hsu
Cambridge University Press, Sep 27, 2001 - History - 426 pages
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In the West ideas about Chinese medicine are commonly associated with traditional therapies and ancient practices which have survived, unchanging, since time immemorial. Originally published in 2001, this volume, edited by Elizabeth Hsu, demonstrates that this is far from the reality. In a series of pioneering case-studies, twelve contributors, from a range of disciplines, explore the history of Chinese medicine and the transformations that have taken place from the fourth century BC onwards. Topics of discussion cover diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, pharmacotherapy, the creation of new genres of medical writing and schools of doctrine. This interdisciplinary volume will be of value to anyone with an interest in the various aspects of Chinese medicine.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Mai and qi in the Western Han
13
The influence of nurturing life culture on the development of Western
19
how mai and qi determine bing
51
Correlative cosmologies
93
Iatromancy diagnosis and prognosis in Early Chinese medicine
99
The system of the five circulatory phases and the six seasonal influences
121
Dietetics and pharmacotherapy
167
The canons revisited in Late Imperial China
215
an innovation in natural history?
221
the nineteenth
262
Medical case histories
293
the modernisation
324
Medical rationale in the Peoples Republic
337
civil war
343
two case studies from contemporary China
370

Dietetics in Tang China and the first extant works of materia dietetica
173
some remarks on the use of white
192

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