Essays by Matthew Arnold: Including Essays in Criticism, 1865, On Translating Homer (with F. W. Newman's Reply)

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Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press, 1914 - Literature - 487 pages
 

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Page 219 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee; but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory.
Page 200 - Wash you, make you clean ; put away the evil of your doings from before mine eyes; Cease to do evil; learn to do well; Seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, Judge the fatherless, plead for the widow.
Page 304 - What is this that he saith unto us, A little while and ye shall not s.ee me ; and again, a little while and ye shall see me ; and, Because I go to the Father ? They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while? We cannot tell what he saith.
Page 415 - The wretched parents all that night Went shouting far and wide; But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. At day-break on a hill they stood That overlooked the moor; And thence they saw the bridge of wood, A furlong from their door. They wept @ and, turning homeward, cried, "In heaven we all ) shall meet;" @ When in the snow the mother spied The print of Lucy's feet.
Page 204 - Behold, I have here at hand the fourth part of a shekel of silver: that will I give to the man of God, to tell us our way. 9 (Beforetime in Israel, when a man went to inquire of God, thus he spake, Come, and let us go to the seer: for he that is now called a Prophet was beforetime called a Seer.) 10 Then said Saul to his servant, Well said; come, let us go.
Page 413 - Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades Vext the dim sea. I am become a name; For always roaming with a hungry heart Much have I seen and known, - cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but...
Page 35 - Europe as being, for intellectual and spiritual purposes, one great confederation, bound to a joint action and working to a common result; and whose members have, for their common outfit, a knowledge of Greek, Roman, and Eastern antiquity, and of one another. Special, local, and temporary advantages being put out of account, that modern nation will in the intellectual and spiritual sphere make most progress, which most thoroughly carries out this programme.
Page 483 - It is an honour for a man to cease from strife : but every fool will be meddling.
Page 416 - The same whom in my school-boy days I listened to; that Cry Which made me look a thousand ways In bush, and tree, and sky. To seek thee did I often rove Through woods and on the green; And thou wert still a hope, a love; Still longed for, never seen. And I can listen to thee yet; Can lie upon the plain And listen, till I do beget That golden time again.
Page 258 - And lighten glimmering Xanthus with their rays ; The long reflections of the distant fires Gleam on the walls, and tremble on the spires. A thousand piles the dusky horrors gild, And shoot a shady lustre o'er the field. Full fifty guards each flaming pile attend, Whose umber'd arms by fits thick flashes send ; Loud neigh the coursers o'er their heaps of corn, And ardent warriors wait the rising morn.

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