Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, Part 33

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C.B. Lewis, Baptist Mission Press, 1868 - Indic literature

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Page 121 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 123 - We maintain, that, like all other organized beings, mankind cannot have originated in single individuals, but must have been created in that numeric harmony which is characteristic of each species ; men must have originated in nations, as the bees have originated in swarms, and as the different social plants have at first covered the extensive tracts over which they naturally spread.
Page 90 - I could not help looking at these unpretending lecture halls with a deep interest, as I thought of the pandits lecturing there to generation after generation of eager inquisitive minds. Seated on the floor with his " corona " of listening pupils round him, the teacher expatiates on those refinements of infinitesimal logic which make a European's brain dizzy to think of, but whose labyrinth a trained Nadia student will thread with unfaltering precision. I noticed during my visit middle-aged and even...
Page 90 - As lene was his hors as is a rake, And he was not right fat, I undertake; But loked holwe, and therto soberly.
Page 191 - Had they at any period possessed a knowledge of the art of making iron, conservative of their customs as such races are, it is scarcely likely that they would have forgotten it. It is therefore not unreasonable to suppose that there was a period, anterior to the advent of the Hindus, when iron was quite unknown to them...
Page 35 - The Aryans invented no alphabet of their own for their special form of human speech, but were, in all their migrations, indebted to the nationality amid whom they settled for their instruction in the science of writing...
Page 180 - Kakhyens,* and others, when they soon extended their operations to the plains, and to the siege of large towns; and the local government receiving no assistance from Pekin finally succumbed, the insurgents became supreme, and a separate Panthay Government was established with its Head-quarters at Tali or Talifoo ; then only a city of secondary importance, but where the Mahomedan element had always been very strong. Feeble attempts have since been made from time to time to recover the lost province,...
Page 26 - No geodetic measure in any part of the world surpasses, or perhaps equals, in accuracy this splendid achievement. By the light it throws on researches into the figure and dimensions of the earth, it forms one of the most valuable contributions to that branch of science which we possess, whilst, at the same time, it constitutes a foundation for the geography of Northern India, the integrity of which must for ever stand unquestioned. Colonel Everest reduced the whole system of the Great Trigonometrical...
Page 179 - Chinese, they at first took to the woods and mountain fastnesses, from thence they carried on a fierce guerilla warfare. Meeting everywhere with success, they were soon joined by large numbers of the neighbouring semi-independent hill tribes of Shans, Kakhyens,* and others, when they soon extended their operations to the plains, and to the siege of large towns; and the local government receiving no assistance from Pekin finally succumbed, the insurgents became supreme, and a separate Panthay Government...
Page 189 - Kheriahs do not eat the flesh of sheep, and may not even use a woollen rug. It would be exceedingly interesting, if this custom could be traced to its origin ; I do not remember to have seen it stated of any other race.

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