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OF HIS RETURN FROM SPAIN.

FROM THE SAME,

Tagus farewell ! that westward with thy streams
Turns up the grains of gold already tried;
With spur and sail, for I go seek the Thames,
Gainward the sun that sheweth her wealthy pride;
And to the town which Brutus sought by dreams,
Like bended moon, doth lend her lusty side.
My king, my country, alone for whom I live,
Of mighty love for this the wings me give.

· FROM HIS ODES, AN EARNEST SUIT TO HIS UNKIND MISTRESS NOT

TO FORSAKE HIM.

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And wilt thou leave me thus ?
That hath given thee my heart,
Never for to depart,
Neither for pain nor smart,
And wilt thou leave me thus ?
Say nay! say nay!

And wilt thou leave me thus ?
And have no more pity
Of him that loveth thee;
Helas thy cruelty !
And wilt thou leave me thus ?
Say nay! say nay !

TO HIS MISTRESS.

Fonger not yet the tried intent
Of such a truth as I have meant;
My great travail so gladly spent,
Forget not yet!

Forget not yet when first began
The weary life, ye know since whan, -
The suit, the service, none tell can;
Forget not yet!

Forget not yet the great assays, i

The cruel wrong, the scornful ways,. VOL. I.

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The painful patience in delays,
Forget not yet !

Forget not !-Oh! forget not this,
How long ago hath been, and is
The mind that never meant amiss,
Forget not yet!

Forget not then thine own approv'd;
The which so long hath thee so lov'd,
Whose steadfast faith yet never mov'd,
Forget not this !

HE LAMENTETH THAT HE HAD EVER CAUSE TO

DOUBT HIS LADY'S FAITH.
Deem as ye list upon good cause,
I may or think of this or that; .
But what or why myself best knows,
Whereby I think and fear not.
But thereunto I may well think
The doubtful sentence of this clause;
I would it were not as I think;
I would I thought it were not.

For if I thought it were not so,

Though it were so, it griev'd me not; · Unto my thought it were as thô ;

I hearkened though I hear not.

At that I see I cannot wink,
Nor from my thought so let it go:
I would it were not as I think ;
I would I thought it were not.

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Lo! how my thought might make me free,

Of that perchance it needs not:
· Perchance none doubt the dread I see;

I shrink at that I bear not.
But in my heart this word shall sink,
Until the proof may better be ; .
I would it were not as I think;
I would I thought it were not.

If it be not, shew no cause why
I should so think, then care not ;
Por I shall so myself apply
To be that I appear not. ,
That is, as one that shall not shrink
To be your own until I die;
And if that be not as I think,
Likewise to think it is not.

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HENRY HOWARD,

EARL OF SURREY.

Walpole, Ellis, and Warton, gravely inform us that Lord Surrey contributed to the victory of Flodden, a victory which was gained before Lord Surrey was born. The mistakes of such writers may teach charity to criticism. Dr. Nott, who has cleared away much fable and anachronism from the noble poet's biography, supposes that he was born in or about the year 1516, and that he was educated at Cambridge, of which university he was afterwards elected high steward. · At the early age of sixteen he was contracted in marriage to the Lady Frances Vere, daughter to John Earl of Oxford. The Duke of Richmond was afterwards affianced to Surrey's sister. It was customary, in those times, to delay, frequently for years, the consummations of such juvenile matches ; and the writer of Lord Surrey's life, already mentioned, gives reasons for supposing that the poet's residence at Windsor, and his inti. mate friendship with Richmond, so tenderly recorded in his verses, took place, not in their absolute childhood, as has been generally imagined, but im. mediately after their being contracted to their re

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