A Narrative of Surprising Conversions

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Sovereign Grace Publishers,, 2000 - Religion - 116 pages

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Contents

Section I A General Introductory Statement
7
The Manner of Conversion Various
17
This Work further illustrated in Particular Instances
38
The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God
52
The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the True Spirit
60
Negative Signs
62
Distinguishing Evidences of a Work of the Spirit of God
75
Practical Inferences
83
An Account of the Revival in Northampton in 174042 in a Letter to a Minister of Boston
101
Copy of a Covenant
105
Copyright

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Page 79 - If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. Hereby know we that we dwell in him, and he in us, because he hath given us of his Spirit.
Page 52 - Blessed are the eyes which see the things that ye see: For I tell you that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them ; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them.
Page 94 - Many will say to me in that day, "Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name, and in thy name cast out devils, and in thy name done many wonderful works?" And then will I profess unto them, "I never knew you; depart from me, ye that work iniquity.
Page 53 - Who are these that fly as a cloud, and as the doves to their windows...
Page 80 - And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love: and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him.
Page 88 - And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground; and should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear.
Page 80 - In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.
Page 57 - Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand : and if Satan cast out Satan, he is divided against himself; how shall then his kingdom stand?

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About the author (2000)

In 1716 Edwards was admitted to Yale at the remarkable age of thirteen. After he graduated in 1722, he spent four years there pursuing theological interests, teaching, and completing his master's degree. In 1727 ,Edwards complied with his grandfather's request and traveled to Northhampton, Massachusetts to be his assistant in his church. A committed scholar of John Calvin and the early Puritan theologians, as well as of the writings of John Locke and Isaac Newton, Edwards pursued a theology founded on two seemingly contradictory themes---a desire to return to the Calvinist tradition, as well as a desire to include the insights of contemporary Enlightenment philosophy. While Edwards's theological formulations were not completely developed until the 1750s, his lifetime pursuit of these ideas profoundly influenced the Puritan period of religious revival known as the Great Awakening. Though Edwards's provocative theology and sermons occasionally invoked fire and brimstone, as in the famous Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (1741), his sermons generally moved parishioners to faith through the employment of positive imagery, as in God Glorified in Man's Dependence (1731). In spite of his successes during the Great Awakening, Edwards was ultimately involved in a controversy that led to his dismissal at the Northhampton parish in 1750. Viewed as too progressive by a faction of the church known as the Old Lights, Edwards stepped down after delivering his famous Farewell Sermon (1750), in which he declared that God would ultimately determine whether Edwards had been right or wrong

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