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hundred times before in what actors of the house goes to no other expence call their study. No, Sir ; Garrick for their refreshment than that of left nothing to chance ; every ges- providing a dish of crab-apples that ture, every expression of countenance have been previously roasted on the and variety of voice, was settled in hearth, and a pitcher of fresh water." his closet, before he set his foot upon An agreeable Authoress has rethe stage.

marked the separate male and female

clubs in Lausanne, Zurich, Basle, and ENVIRONS of LAUSANNE, &c.

Geneva: "In the former the men (From the General Outline of the smoked, and talked at intervals of Swiss Landscapes.")

literature and business, amidst the "And saw that all Nature was a Garden." fumes of tea and coffee. In the lat

Lord ORFORD. ter, the ladies presented themselves THE Lake of Gepeva, in the at their coteries with their work-bag! form of a

with one

upon their arms: conversation and of its horos blunted, is fifty-four miles needie-work began together. (Somein length, from Geveva toVilleneuve.” times one reads to the rest.) But this is oa its convex side: the “ There are still more peculiar Alps of Savoy form the country on societies formed from infancy of the South, the hollow of the crescent. children of the same age and of The North is the Pays-de-Vaud ; an the same class. During their childextensive and rich country that files hood, the equality of years is 80 round from the Jura, a ridge of strictly observed in these societies, mountains which divide Switzerland that sisters, whose ages differ three or from France.

four years, have their separate coCharucter and Manners of the teries in the same house. There is Vaudois.

something soothing in the idea of The character of the people of this these infant associations ; it seems country is Savoyard. It is a pro- forming another barrier for the helpvincial French, internixed with the less sex against the future tempests Italian and German. Their dress, of the world; which often beat with manners, and amusemnents, as well as the most pitiless fury against a heart language, do not differ essentially that can least resist their violence, and from those of the Chamouniers, as which then recalls with teoder regret described by De Saussure: “ They the social circle of its childhood; and are inclined to incessaot merriment perhaps fiods consolation in the symand gaiety; and they are surprisingly pathy of some female companiou to quick and full of repartee. They whom it is endeared by the charm of perceive at once the oddities of stran- those early recollections." gers, taking them off in the most Another Philosophical Observer, comical maquer. They are ingenious, speaking of this neighbourhood, says, hospitable, and not averse to indus "I shall never forget the day I was try; but, for want of employment, botanizing near the Rohaila mounfrequent the wine-taveros too much, tain, which belongs to Justice Le and are extravagantly addicted to Clerc. I was quite alone. I pushed gambling. Still they are great think forward a great way into the various ers; and will sometimes put shrewd recesses of the mountain, and through questions to you, that would gravel a long succession of woods and rocks maoy an acute metaphysician. alternately, I came at last to a retreat

They pass their winter evenings 80 completely out of the haunt of exactly as the cbaracters do in the man, that I never beheld a more wild little dramatic entertainment entitled or a more solitary scene ! ContiThe Villager's Evening Amusements. nuiug still to bolanize for some time, At nightfall they'all assemble at some I insensibly became overpowered by peighbour's who has the roomiest the strong impression of the objects house, and in that apartment where

around me.

At last I forgot my bor the fire-place is kept. The women tany altogether; and I reclined my fall to spinning or peeling of flax, and head on pillows of Lycopodiun and telling stories. The men busy them moss, musing at my ease. Presently selves in making nicknacks of wood, a sentiment of exultation introduced spoons, seals, tobacco-stoppers, and itself into this reverie. I compared sueb-like things ; while the mistress myself to those mighty Navigators

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. who have discovered some desert in ridges. Its hue at sunset was that island ; and I said to "nyself with no particular blush which is discernible small self-complacency, “most as between the folds of a white rose. suredly I am the first mortal that The superiority of its height over ever placed his foot here.” While I the surrounding mountains is marked was pluming myself on this idea, I to every eye in the inost striking heard a sound close by that I thought manner--the sun pot setting to it unI was no stranger to. I began to til long after he had to every other. listen. The same noise was repeated, On the right extremity of the Lake, and became still louder. I started the situation of Geneva could be up with a mixture of surprise and guessed at, only, by the smoke of its curiosity, and made my way through houses. Here the Lake becomes narbriars and thorns towards the place row for a long way like a river. whence the voise issued; when, about Nearly under our feet was the town a hundred yards from the place where of Rolles. The roofs of its houses I had been thus musing, and fancying were no bigger than the divisions in myself at the extremity of the world, honeycombs. Behind us, successively I perceived a stocking-manufactory." as the day departed, might be disHe continues, “ I cannot express the cerned the black-red purple of the confused and contradictory emotions Jura, next its grey-blue, then ils I felt upon this discovery. My first darkest grey. The bank of the Vaud, emotion was joy, at finding iyself from Vevay to Lausanne, undulates so 'unexpectedly among my fellow. gently round by the shore; and, as creatures. But who would have ex soon as it arrives at the latter place, pected to meet with a manufactory it sinks down, and is diffused into the in such a place! Switzerland is the vast plain poured around us on every poly country in the world that exhi side. The sight absolutely turns bits this mixture of the wildest na giddy as it glances round this rich ture with civilization. All Switzer- variety of objects, the woods of oak, land is nothing, so to say, but a great country villas, coru-fields, vineyards, city; whose long and broad streels and all the towns and villages of the are planted with forests, and inter- Pays-de-Vaud. This view, shewing sected with mountains; and whose more the boundaries of the Lake than houses, insulated and scattered wide that from Lausanne, must of course asunder, communicate, by English leave less for the imagination. The gardens only, with each other. Now aspect, too, that the banks have bere, we are upon this subject, I recollect is neither so varied, nor so happy as another botaniziog excursion that I at that place. And yet it was at this made, along with Du Peyrou and a spot that Tavernier, the voiversal few others, not long ago, on the traveller, fixed his residence, as the Chasseral; froin whose summit no most beautiful point of view in the less than seven lakes are visible. known world. There is only a single house on that mountain ; but the inhabitant of it is View from the Dent de Vauillon, a buwiseller, and I was credibly as The next morning, at four, we besured he has plenty of business. It gan to ascend the Jura. The sun was strikes ine that a single fact of this in a rough sea of cloud-work, which kind serves to give a truer notion of his beams pierced through with veins Switzerland, than the accounts of any in a crystalized form, of lhe colour of traveller whatsoever.”

carbuncle. The ascents of the Jura View from Aubonne.

are made practicable even for a carThe view from Aubonne compasses riage. At every step we rose, the the Lake' from end to end; but the Alps were extended and multiplied on Western end should be seen by the all sides: but Mount Blanc might be rising, and the Eastern by the setting observed heaving up above the rest,

From the vast distance, the and surging in the skies, to a vast mouth of the Rhone is scarce dis- height. At the same time, what the cernible. Villeneuve, from the con prospect gains in compass, it losos in vexity of the Lake's surface, seemed distinctness. The horizon widens its inmersed up to its very spires in the ring, so as to encompass far beyond water. We remarked the glaciers of the lake of Neuschatel. We admired Mount Blanc, rising up on its volume the fine beod of the Jura's outline

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lengthened down into the plains are the winds and meteors of Heaven; below.

and every object appears as if seen In the afternoon I went up alone “Through a glass, and darkly." to the Dept de Vauillon : it takes an This is the same prospect that De hour's very fast climbing to reach Saussure describes, as he saw it once this suminit. The solitudes of the from the Dole, but at another hour, way-its being haunted by wolves or

A thick cloud had overspread the bears, and the wind twanging every

Lake of Geneva, the neighbouring now and then in your ears, startle hills, and even all the lower mounyou. Belween the South and West tains. The summit of the Dole, and points of the compass the whole val the highest Alps, alone raised their ley of Joux lay in prospect before me.

heads above this immense veil. A It'exhibited the lake of Rousses, with brilliant sun shone vertically down the two others; while the interme upon the whole surface of this cloud; diate river was weaving its shining and the Alps illuminated by his rays, way from lake to lake, with the move as also by the light reverberated from ment of a silk-worin. The road by this cloud, appeared in the greatest which we had come along the valley, lustre; and were visible at å prodi. seemed a loose-stretched cord. Westo gious distance. But this situation, ward lay France, whose ridges ran he says, had something in it“ terrible across my view far and wide, the ex and strange. I thought I stood alone tremity of them both ways being in- upon a rock in the midst of a billowy discernible ; not only on account of sea, at an immense distance from a the distance, but of the setting sun continent bordered by a long reef of beams that glared in my eyes. To- inaccessible cliffs." wards the North there tempested a After having gazed at this sublime sea of mountains. Between the North spectacle on all sides, and contemand East you may descry a lake with plated it till my eyes were quite dim, à city at this end of it, probably I looked back on the West, and found Yverduu : farther to the right, specks that the sun had dropped below the or shadows, said to be lakes. A horizon. It was necessary to think broad and lofty inountain covers Orbe, of retiring ; and though the descent and others again the Travers įvalley; of the mountain was in my favour, All these objects, together with the yet before I could reach ihe town Vevay mountains, cantoo of Friboury, it was dark. and glaciers of Berne, completed this quarter.

Mr. URBAN, Hackney, Sept. 9. Between the Eastern and Souihern SUBMIT for insertion the under, points, you may observe a long and

mentioned analogy between an broad gleam, and the form of its Agricultural and a Commercial Counlucid cresceut marks it for no other try, or, in plain English, between than the Lake of Geneva. But one Germany and England. It is copied of its horns, being intercepted by a from a popular pamphlet receptly mountain, is darkened. Beyond lie published in the City, and is the prothe Alps of Savoy gathered rouud duction of a sensible young German Mount Blanc; which Tast, though 30 Merchant. miles distant, seems still towering “ This Country is rich in real and near you. In short, the landscape is fictitious wealth ; but is burthened with here placed like the model in relief an enormous National Debt, a paperof General Pfiffer; only that it is as currency, and heavy taxes ; its populalarge as Nature, and real -- and that tion is condensed in large masses; the here every object appears indistinct

must unbounded luxury is contrasted by from the distance, the lateness of the the most abject want; in fact, the state hour, and the misliness of the air at

of society is artificial. Germany is comthis season.

paratively poor, but has no debt, no paI vever was so sensible in my life per, and few taxes; the population is as here of a profound solitude. The spread more equally over the whole sur

face; there is not the same luxury, nor earth, from ihese heights of the sky, the same distress. In short, the state seems another world, and the spec- of society is more natural. In the one tator is confined to a planet by him country the cunning artificer must earn self.

The only company you have wages to buy his dinner; in the other, Gent. Mag. Suppl. LXXXVI. Pars II.

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who have discovered some desert in ridges. Its hue at sunset was that islands and I said to myself with no particular blush which is discernible small self-complacency, “most as between the folds of a white rose. suredly I am the first mortal that The superiority of its height over ever placed bis foot here." While I the surrounding mountains is marked was pluming myself on this idea, I to every eye in the inost striking heard a sound close by that I thought manner-the suo not setting to it unI was no stranger to. I began to til long after he had to every other. listen. The same noise was repeated, On the right extremity of the Lake, and became still louder. I started the situation of Geneva could be up with a mixture of surprise and guessed at, only, by the smoke of its curiosity, and made my way through houses. Here the Lake becomes narbriars and thorns towards the place row for a long way like a river. whence the noise issued; when, about Nearly under our feet was the town a 'hundred yards from the place where of Rolles. The roofs of its houses I had been thus musing, and fancying were po bigger than the divisions in myself at the extremity of the world, honeycombs. Behind us, successively I perceived a stocking-manufactory." as the day departed, might be disa He continues, “ I cannot express the cerned the black-red purple of the confused and contradictory emotions Jura, next its_grey-blue, then its I felt upon this discovery. My first darkest grey. The bank of the Vaud, emotion was joy, at finding iyself from Vevay to Lausanne, undulates so unexpectedly among my fellow gently round by the shore; and, as creatures. But who would have ex soon as it arrives at the latter place, pected to meet with a manufactory it sinks down, and is diffused into the in such a place! Switzerlaod is the vast plain poured around us on every poly country in the world that exhi side. The sight absolutely turns bits this mixture of the wildest pa giddy as it glances round this rich ture with civilization. All Switzer- variety of objects, the woods of oak, land is nothing, so to say, but a great country villas, coru-fields, vineyards, city; whose long and broad streels and all the towns and villages of the are planted with forests, and inter- Pays-de-Vaud. This view, shewing sected with mountains; and whose more the boundaries of the Lake than houses, insulated aud scattered wide that from Lausanne, must of course asunder, communicate, by English leave less for the imagination. The gardens only, with each other. Now aspect, too, that the banks have here, we are upon this subject, I recollect is neither so varied, nor so happy as another botanizing excursion that I at that place. And yet it was at this made, along with Du Peyrou and a spot tbat Tavernier, the universal few others, not long ago, on the traveller, fixed his residence, as the Chasseral; froin whose summit no most beautiful point of view in the less than seven lakes are visible. known world, There is only a single house on that mountain ; but the inhabitant of it is View from the Dent de Vauillon, a bou seller, and I was credibly as The next morning, at four, we besured he has plenty of business. It gan to ascend the Jura. The sun was strikes me that a single fact of this in a rough sea of cloud-work, which kind serves to give a truer notion of his beams pierced through with veins Switzerland, than the accounts of any in a crystalized form, of ihe colour of traveller whatsoever."

carbuncle. The ascents of the Jura View from Aubonne. are made practicable even for a carThe view from Aubonne compasses riage. Ai every step we rose, the the Lake from end to end ; but the Alps were extended and multiplied on Western end should be seen by the all sides : but Mount Blanc might be rising, and the Eastern by the setting observed heaving up above the rest,

From the vast distance, the and surging in the skies, to a vast mouth of the Rhone is scarce dis- height. At the same time, what the cernible. Villeneuve, froin the con prospect gains in compass, it losos in vexity of the Lake's surface, seemed distinctness. The horizon widens its inmersed up to its very spires in the ring, so as to encompass far beyond water. We remarked the glaciers of the lake of Neufchatel. We admired Mount Blanc, rising up on its volume the fine beod of the Jura's outline

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lengthened

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lengthened down into the plains are the wiods and meteors of Heaven ; below.

and

every object appears as if seen In the afternoon I went up alone “ Through a glass, and darkly." to the Dept de Vavillon : it takes an This is the same prospect that De hour's very fast climbing to reach

Saussure describes, as he saw it once this suminit. The solitudes of the from the Dole, but at another hour. way its being baunted by wolves or A thick cloud had overspread the bears, and the wind twanging every

Lake of Geneva, the neighbouring now and then in your ears, startle hills, and even all the lower mounyou. Between the South and West tains. The summit of the Dole, and points of the compass the whole val- the highest Alps, alone raised their ley of Joux lay in prospect before me. heads above this immense veil. A Itexhibited the lake of Rousses, with brilliant sun shone vertically down the two others; while the interme upon the whole surface of this cloud; diate river was weaving its shining and the Alps illuminated by his rays, way from lake to lake, with the move as also by the light reverberated from ment of a silk-worin. The road by this cloud, appeared in the greatest which we had come aloog the valley, lustre; and were visible at å prodiseemed a loose-stretched cord. West. gious distance. But this situation, ward lay France, whose ridges ran he says, had something in it“ terrible across my view far and wide, the ex and strange. I thought I stood alone tremity of them both ways being in upon a rock in the midst of a billowy discernible; not only on account of sea, at an immense distance from a the distance, but of the setting sud continent bordered by a long reef of beams that glared in my eyes. To. inaccessible cliffs.". wards the North there tempested a After having gazed at this sublime sea of mountains. Between the North spectacle on all sides, and contemand East you may descry a lake with plated it till my eyes were quite dim, a city at this end of it, probably I looked back on the West, and found Yverduu : farther to the right, specks that the sun had dropped below the or shadows, said to be lakes. A borizon. It was necessary to think broad and lofty inouotain covers Orbe, of retiring ; and though the descent and others again the Travers įvalley; of the mountain was in any favour, All these objects, together with the yet before I could reach ihe town Vevay mountains, cantop of Friboury, it was dark. and glaciers of Berne, completed this quarter.

Mr. URBAN, Hackney, Sept. 9. Between the Eastern and Southern SUBMIT for insertion the under, points, you may observe a long and

nientioned analogy between an broad gleam, and the form of ils Agricultural and a Commercial Counlucid crescent marks it for no other try, or, in plain English, between than the Lake of Geneva. But one

Germany and England. It is copied of its horns, being intercepted by a from a popular pamphlet receplly mountain, is darkened. Beyond lie published in the City, and is the prothe Alps of Savoy gathered round duction of a sensible young German Mount Blanc; which last, though 30 Merchant. miles distant, seems still towering “ This Country is rich in real and near you. In short, the landscape is fictitious wealth ; but is burthened with here placed like the model in relief an enormous National Debt, a paperof General Pfiffer; only that it is as currency, and heavy taxes ; its populae large as Nature, and real — and that tion is condensed in large masses; the here every object appears indistinct must unbounded luxury is contrasted by from the distance, the lateness of the the most ahject want ; in fact, the state hour, and the mistiness of the air at

of society is artificial. Germany is comthis season.

paratively poor, but has no debt, no paI vever was so sensible in my life per, and few taxes ; the population is as here of a profound solitude. The spread more equally over the whole sur

there is not the same luxury, nor earth, from ihese heights of the sky, the same distress. In short, the state seems another world, and the spec

of society is more natural. - In the one tator is confined to a planet by him- country the cunning artificer must earn self. The only company you have wages to buy his dinner; in the other, Gent. Mag. Suppl. LXXXVI. Pars II.

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