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3. Nichols's Literary Anecdotes of the tertainment; but we cannot refrain Eighteenth Century.

gratifying ourselves by inserting the (Continued from Part I. p. 538.) following Letters, which Mr. Wilkes THE account of Mr. T. Christie, received from many illustrious chawith which we concluded our Re. racters on the subject of his publicaview of last Month, is succeeded by tion of Theopbrastus. some entertaining Letters of Mr. Cole and Mr. Bentham ; and these are fol

" In the early progress of the work,

Mr. Wilkes sent some proof-sheets to lowed by two original and ioteresting Dr. Tomson, for his examination, and Epistles of David Hume.

the Doctor submitted them to a friend, The Letters, also, of Governor who addressed the following letter to Thicknesse afford much amusement, Mr. Wilkes : as those of Dr. Slukeley will of infor

'Thornbury, near Bristol, Oct. 24,1789. mation on the subject of Antient Coins.

“Sir, My good friend Dr. Tonsson, of We are very thankful for the com, Kensington, has transmitted to me a munication here made, relating to first proof of an intended new Edition of T. Marlin of Palgrave, of Antiquarian the Characters of Theophrastus. I beg memory. He was an amiable man, to congratulate the publick on two and admirably conversant with the points: tbe one, that the Remains of history and antiquities of his Country. Theophrastus are likely to be sent into He was usually distinguished by the the world; and that you, Sir, undertake appellation of Honest Tom Martin, it., The Doctor, from too great a parand was intimately connected with an

tiality to me, has desired me to give my individual who enjoyed, by universal opinion upon certain points; and he consent, a similar epithet, pamely, be sent to yourself. This will, I trust,

seemed to wish that my answer should Honest Tom Payne.

apologize for my addressing you. The others of his literary brethren, he had

Doctor writes, that the Vatican MS. has to encounter great difficulties in life,

no accents, no aspirates; but preserves and was compelled, doublless with

the apostrophe. The want of accents much anguish of mind, to dispose, proves its aritiquity: for I am fully conwhilst he lived, of a great part of bis vinced that accents are of modern inmost valuable library. He who writes vention; and, as now used, are destructhis, remembers to have seen, in a tive of all quautity. Let any man read provincial town, two cart-loads of old twenty lines in Homer, or Sopbocles, by books on their way to an obscure accents as now used; and that will be, bookseller, who did not know the in I think, a sufficient answer to all the portance of the prize he had obtained, treatises which have been, or ever will and who disposed of them again for a

be, written in their defence. Witb revery trifle. A minute and accurate gard to the Greek letters and words (I account of this learned person has

do not mean as to their form, which has

varied in different ages), I humbly think been given in the new edition of the

that the antient inscriptions would be Biographical Dictionary, now publisbe the best guide. Muratori bas the largest ing by Mr. Alexander Chalmers.

collection; but, as the Vatican MS. has We vext meet with the venerable

omitted them, for uniformity's sake they names of Pyle, father and sons. The

may be omitted through the whole ; father enjoyed deservedly whilst he though I confess it to be singular. For lived the uninterrupted friendship of the same reason, the apostrophe should Bishop Hoadly. The youngest son,

be retained. The Vatican MS. as the Pyle, was personally and inti Doctor writes, retains it. One thing is mately known to the Reviewer, and omitted, which I have taken the liberty well deserved a much more enlarged

to supply; I mean the iota.. This seems potice ; which, it is hoped, some Cor

to me to be absolutely essential. Anrespondent will yet supply:

tient inscriptions, &c. were generally ex

bibited in capital letters, and then the We cannot, however, help hasten

iota was adjoined. I believe no instance iog a little onward, to arrive at the most excellent sketch of the very ce

can be produced of its omission. Does

the Vatican MS. omit it? As to the lebrated John Wilkes, compiled, as

manner, I think it very goud : the letter most obviously appears, from personal of a proper size; and the lines at proper knowledge, joined to the most accu distances. One thing I beg to object rale information. It appears alınost against; I mean, capital letters to begin an act of injustice to mutilate this each sentence. I am no military man, article, wbich is peculiarly full of en- yet I love a military review; and my

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to

lowing:

eye would be offended to see here and is equally immaculate as his Catullus. there a perked-up grenadier of six feet He is much Aattered by his acceptance four inches, breaking the line of five of the trifles he ventured to offer; but, feet ten inches. Indeed, I would allow as he could make no adequate compenan officer, pro dignitate, like a proper sạtion, he endeavoured to testify his name, to exceed in height. I have grateful sense of his favours.' drawn a line through these grenadiers. Queen's-square, Jane 5. Mr. CracheIt is quite right that ligatures should be rode has the honour to return his thanks banished. I have mentioned one or two to Mr. Wilkes, for the most complete other particulars to Dr. Tomson ; Edition of the Characters of Theophraswhom I beg my best compliments. I tus as yet printed ; and to express the have the honour to be, Sir, your very very grateful sense he entertains of his obedient servant,

W. HOLWELL.'

repeated favours.' “ This plan was adopted, and Theo Soho-square, June 6. I know not phrastus is without accents.

whether you extend the liberality with

which you distribute to your friends co“Among the many acknowledgements pies of your valuable Éditions of the which were sent to him were the fol

Classicks any further : but I do know

that I have an application from the Li' Park-place, May 29, 1790.

brary of the University of Gottingen, Dear Sir, I return you many thanks

now one of the very best in Europe ; for the valuable present, which I have this moment received, of your new Edi- requesting that, as money will not pur:

chase them, your goodness will place tion of Theophrastus. Its value to me them there. I do not mean to press consists in its being a memorial, and not the first of the kind, of your friendship. the subject; su shall only say, that, in

upon any resolutions you have made on As such, I shall ever sacredly preserve it; acceding to the prayer of their petition, and shall contemplate it with more plea- you will command the gratitude of some sure than the perusal could atford to

very learned mnen. Believe me, dear many who possess the knowledge which

Sir, &c.

Jos. BANKS.' I have unfortunately lost, if I can pretend to have ever attained it, of the lan

Bushy Park, Sept. 27, 1790. guage in which its contents are written. • Sir,-Being possessed of a very good I am under a solemn engagement to Sir

collection of the Greek and Latin AuJohn Elliot, and mean to perform it, thors, and some very curious Editions, that I will learn the Spanisti language, I cannot belp entertaining an anxious for the purpose of reading Don Quixote desire of enriching my Library by the in the original text of a beautiful im addition of your two elegant publica. pression which he gave me. If I have tions of Catullus and Theophrastus. life and leisure, I will not despair of be

But, alas! I find by inquiry among all ing able to qualify myself to profit in the the Booksellers, that they are not to be like manner by your gift. I have the purchased; and that I can only make bonour to be, dear Sir, your much

that valuable acquisition by addressing obliged and most faithful servant, myself to your liberality. That course

WARREN HASTINGS.' I have therefore taken. If you should • Ken Wood, June 3, 1790. Lord

have the goodness both to pardon and Mansfield returns many thanks to Mr.

to comply with my application, be as

sured that no person on whom you may Wilkes for his Theophrastus; and con

have conferred the same obligation will gratulates him upon his elegant amusement. Tbeophrastus drew so admirably

set a higher value on the present than from Nature, that his Characters live myself. I have the honour to be, Sir, through all times, and in every country.' your most obedient and most humble

SYLVESTER DOUGLAS.'

servant, * Leicester-fields, June 4. Sir. Joshua Reynolds presents bis compliments to

. Althorp, Oct. 17, 1790. Mr.Wilkes, and returns him many thanks "Sir,-Though I have not the advanfor the present he has made him ; the tage of being personally acquainted with value of which is much increased, in his you, I cannot avoid taking the liberty of estimation, by the honour of receiving it troubling you with a few lines, to return from him. He is very much flattered by you my most sincere acknowledgements Mr. Wilkes's polite attention to him.' for the very obliging manner in which

Cavendish-square, June 5. Sir John you have done me the bonour to send Thorold presents his compliments to me your beautiful Edition of TheophrasMr. Wilkes; is much honoured by his tus upon vellum. I esteem myself pekind remembrance, and the valuable culiarly fortunate, as a Collector of scarce present he bas made himn of his Edition and valuable books, that, in conse. of Theopbrastus; wbich, he doubts not, quence of my having purchased Count

Reviczky's

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Reviczky's Collection *, I am become ating respect. In one thing he seemed the possessor of two books, not more de more fortunate than his contemporary sirable on account of the correctness Hepburn; for he died rich, and the and beauty of their execution, than from other poor. Hepburn's numerous pathe name and reputation of their Editor; tients were, it seems, more liberal in whose talents and abilities, having al- feasting than in feeing him; whereas ready made so distinguished a subject Browne would not have been satisfied for our political, must in future be with that sort of liberality. — Browne equally celebrated by our literary, histo certainly was a person of no common rians. I have the honour to be, Sir, cast, or ordinary genius. Men of his with great truth, your most obedient sort are not to be seen every day; and humble servant,

SPENCER.'” when they do appear, they are sure to The remainder of this Volume is attract observation, and apt to make a occupied by important and interesting stir wherever they bappen to fix their Additions to those which precede. those who opposed the ruling powers at

residence. Browne was at the head of They must unquestionably have been the result of much severe labour and

Lynn for most part of his long residence

in that town; and he appears to have conapplication, and they display the most ducted bimself with no small share of skill minute care and accuracy in their and dexterity; and with considerable effect methodical arrangement.

when the squabble assumed any thing Weshall point outtwo articles among of a literary aspect. Dr. Edmund Pyle a great multitude, which have afford seems to bave been his chief opponent; ed the most unmixed gratification. but he sometimes had the whole cor" Sir William Browne first settled at

porate body at him ; yet he generally Lynn, under the patronage of the Tur.

repelled their attacks very stoutly and ner family, about the year 1716; and in

successfully; and the opposition made Feb. 1718 his name was enrolled among

by him and his friends is supposed to the free burgesses of that town; though

have been often of essential service to

the town. there appears not to have been any great

At a contested election in cordiality between him and the Corpo- led to an intimacy with Mr. Folkes, and

1747, he bore a conspicuous part; which ration, and on some public occasion he set up a kind of competition for pre

to the marriage of that gentleman with cedence with the Mayor. This appears

Sir William's only daughter. - The late by the following extract from the Town

Mr. Thomas Hollingbury, many years a Records : Aug. 29, 1723, Ordered, that respectable bookseller at Lynn, used to a Letter he written by the Town Clerk

say, that the first time he had to make to Dr. William Browne, to acquaint

out his bill after the Doctor had been him with the resentment of this Corpo

dubbed a Knight, he wrote Sir William ration of his affront to the Mayor (Rich. Browne Debtor to Thomas Hollingbury. Harwick, esq.], Justices, and Gentlemen

When be delivered it into the Knight's of the Corporation, by an undue pre- hand, he looked at it a short time, and cedence he assumed and persisted in on

then, looking at him, said, “Mr. Hola Monday last.” At that period he styled lingbury, you might have said The Hohimself M. D. of both Universities ; and nourable Sir William Browne.' he appears to have got on fast in the your pardon, Sir William,' replied the way of his vocation, so as to obtain a

Bookseller ; 'but, upon my word, I did large share of popularity and practice,

not know that it was customary to preespecially among the middling and lower fix to the name of a Knight the word classes of the community, which he is

Honourable.'-'As to that,' replied the said to have turned to very good account;

Knight, if it be not customary, it would and he is understood to have made much yet have been pleasing.'-- Dr. Pyle, in a more of his patients in the pecuniary letter to his Father, in July 1752, says, way, than his rival Physician at Lynn

Your old friend Sir William Browne [Dr. George Hepburn] was able to make

came to my Lord Bishop of Winchester of his among the bigher orders. Having

some weeks ago, and told him, that he become the popular Physician and fa

waited upon him for a pension payable vourite, he the less regarded the favour

out of his estate to the College of Phyof the gentry or bigher classes. He has sicians.' My Lord said, ' he never heard been spoken of at Lynn as a good Phy

of any such pension paid out of his revesician; but out of the line of bis profes

nues;. and as to an estate of his own, sion, either from bis vanity or bis eccen.

he had none.'-Yes,' said the Knight, tricities, he had not the art of concili 'you are cbargeable herewith out of

such an estate. My Lord said, he * Which included a copy of Mr.

had no estate any where of his own ; Wilkes's Catullus on vellum,

and, as Bishop of Winchester, he had no

such

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son.

such estate as was named.'-Bishop of that tends to bis present or future proWinchester !' quoth the Knight ; 'why motion. I am, my dear Sir, your much then I am wrong; you are not the per- obliged and obedient humble servant, I wanted Sir Cecil Bishopr; and

JACOB BRYANT. they told me he lived here.'-' Is Sir

P. S. I have, after all, omitted one Cecil Bishopp a Clergyman?' says my publication, through my default of me. Lord.-No,' says the Knight. Why mory, which is. An Address to Mr. then, Sir, you might have seen your mis; Richardson.”—[Qu. What was this ?] take immediately; and so your servant.'

The more nearly we approach the The epitaph on Sir W. Browne is conclusion of this work, the more rethen given, which has appeared in the luctant do we feel to leave it. It First Part of our last Volume, p. 199. consists of such abundant and go

A most curious and facetious Let- pleasing a variety, that we have found ter from Horace Walpole to the Rev. it exceedingly difficult to make any William Cole will be found at p. 711. thing like a selection for our Readers'

There are a great many of our information and amuseinent. The Readers who will be exceedingly multitude of Original Letters from thankful to us for insertivg an accu- individuals of the greatest eminence, rate List of the various Works of the the various elucidations of characters truly learned Jacob Bryant, as given hitherto imperfectly understood, the

himself in a Leller to Mr. Roberts almost infinite number of Anecdotes of Ealing:

Political and Literary, would justify Windsor, June 21, 1802. our separate and detailed commendaDear Sir, -Though your kind preju- tion. No publication of modern times dice in my favour exceeds any thing to possesses, with equal copiousness, which I can pretend, yet it is very satis- similar advantages, and such general factory, as I must always wish to stand

utility. : fair in the opinion of every person

of

The account of the eccentric Mr. learning and goodness. The publications which I have at times sent into the Pratt, commonly known by the apworld are, to the best of my memory;

pellation of Courtney Melmoth, apthose which are subjoined: and as you pears at p. 722, and is full of amusewere so good as to request a list of them, ment; a more fertile brain or extra. I am glad ibat 1 bave this recollection, ordinary character has not been often and am able to afford an account of the met with in any country. Among several Treatises. 1. Concerning the the distinguished persons by whom Island Melite of St. Paul. 2. Of the this Writer was particularly noticed, Wind Euroclydon, 3. Observations upon was the celebrated actor Mr. HenderAntient History. 4. Vindiciae Flavianæ. soll, whoin the Editor has omitted to 5. Concerning the Apamean Medal. 6. mention. Concerning a Passage in Justin Martyr. Since the well-deserved compliment 7. The Analysis of Antient Mythology, 3 yols. 8. Answer to Whittenbeck of ed Deay of Winehester (see p. 729),

paid to Mr. Rennell, son of the learn, Amsterdam. 9. Address to Dr. Priestley. this Gentleinan has been appointed, 10. Concerning Rowley's Poems, 2 vols. 11. A Treatise upon the Christian Reli- in a manner alike honourable to the gion. 12. A Treatise upon the Miracles

Patron and himself, to the valuable of Moses in Egypt. 13. A Treatise upon Vicarage of Kensington. - But it is Pbilo Judæus. 14. A Monody upon the time to take our leave of this meritoDeath of Lord H. Spencer' 15. Dis-' rivus performance, which we do with sertation upon the War of Troy. 16. much cordiality and esteem, merely Observations upon a Treatise by Mr. pausing to observe, that this Volume Morrit. 17. Observations upon Mr.Che is embellished with some excellent valier. 18. Expostulation with the Bri- Portraits; namely, of Basire the Entish Critick.--My memory begins to sail; graver, Myine, Bishop Trevor, Bishop but I believe the List above given is a true one.-We begia to be uneasy in

North, Bishop Buller, and others ;

together with an engraving of Dr. consequence of the loss which we must

Hawes's Monument, the Wio w at suffer in the departure of Dr. Good

Stationers' Hall, and a Fac-simile of enough and his excellent family to Ro. chester. I shall be deprived of the ac

one of Pope's Letters. quaintance and friendship which I have ...

With this Volume is published a for some time very happily experienced. copious and very useful lodex lo the But we must not repine at any thing Eighth and Ninih Volumes. Gent. Mag. July, 1916.

two

Like naoy

3. Nichols's Literary Anecdotes of the tertainment; but we cannot refrain

Eighteenth Century.
(Continued from Part I. p. 538.)

gratifying ourselves by inserting the

following Letters, which Mr. Wilkes THE account of Mr. T. Christie, received from many illustrious chawith which we concluded our Re. racters on the subject of his publicaview of last Month, is succeeded by tion of Theopbrastus. some entertaining Letters of Mr. Cole and Mr. Bentham ; and these are fol

“In the early progress of the work,

Mr. Wilkes sent some proof-sheets to lowed by two original and interesting Dr. Toinson, for his examination, and Epistles of David Hume.

the Doctor submitted them to a friend, The Letters, also, of Governor who addressed the following letter to Thicknesse afford much amusement, Mr. Wilkes : as those of Dr. Slukeley will of information on the subject of Antient Coins.

"Thornbury, near Bristol, Oct. 24, 1789.

Sir,-My good friend Dr. Tomson, of We are very thankful for the com Kensington, has transmitted to me a munication here made, relating to first proof of an intended new Edition of T. Marlin of Palgrave, of Antiquarian the Characters of Theophrastus. I beg memory. He was an amiable man, to congratulate the publick on and admirably conversant with the points: the one, that the Remains of history and antiquities of his country. Theophrastus are likely to be sent into He was usually distinguished by the the world; and that you, Sir, undertake appellation of Honest Tom Martin,

it. The Doctor, from too great a parand was intimately connected with an

tiality to me, has desired me to give my individual who enjoyed, by universal

opinion upon certain points; and he consent, a similar epithet, namely,

seemed to wish that my answer should Honest Tom Payne.

be sent to yourself. This will, I trust, others of his literary brethren, he had

apologize for my addressing you. The

Doctor writes, that the Vatican MS. has to encounter great difficulties in life,

no accents, no aspirates; but preserves and was compelled, doublless with

the apostrophe. The want of accents much anguish of mind, to dispose, proves its antiquity: for I am fully conwhilst he lived, of a great part of his vinced that accents are of modern in. most valuable library. He who writes vention; and, as now used, are destructhis, remembers to have seen, in a tive of all quautity. Let any man read provincial town, two cart-loads of old twenty lines in Homer, or Sopbocles, by books on their way to an obscure accents as now used; and that will be, bookseller, who did not know the in I think, a sufficient answer to all the portance of the prize he had obtained, treatises which have been, or ever will and who disposed of them again for a

be, written in their defence. Witb revery trifle. A minute and accurate

gard to the Greek letters and words (I account of this learned person has

do not mean as to their form, which has been given in the new edition of the

varied in different ages), I hunibly think Biographical Dictionary, now publisbe the best guide. Muratori bas the largest

that the antient inscriptions would be ing by Mr. Alexander Chalmers.

collection ; but, as the Vatican MS. has We next meet with the venerable omitted i bem, for uniformity's sake they names of Pyle, father and sons. The

may be omitted through the whole ; father enjoyed deservedly whilst be though I confess it to be singular. For lived the uninterrupted friendship of the same reason, the apostrophe should Bishop Hoadly. The youngest son,

be retained. The Vatican Ms. as the Pyle, was personally and inti- Doctor writes, retains it. One thing is mately known to the Reviewer, and omitted, which I have taken the liberty well deserved a much more enlarged

to supply; I mean the iota. This seems potice ; which, it is hoped, some Cor

to me to be absolutely essential. Anrespondent will yet supply:

tient inscriptions, &c. were generally exWe cannot, however, help hasten

bibited in capital letters, and then the ing a little onward, to arrive at the

iota was adjoived. I believe no instance most excellent sketch of the very ce

can be produced of its omission. Does lebrated John Wilkes, compiled, as

the Vatican Ms. omit it? As to the most obviously appears, from personal

manner, I think it very goud : the letter

of a proper size; and the lines at proper knowledge, joined to the most accu distances. One thing I beg to object rate information. It appears alınost against; I mean, capital letters to begin an act of injustice to mutilate this each sentence.

I am no military man, article, wbich is peculiarly full of en- yet I love a military review; and my

eyo

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