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Illingworth ; 10th, Argent, a Cross en death of a literary Gentleman, in grailed Sable, between four Ermine spots. which it was added that « he took a Crest, upon a wreath, a basilisk pró.

very active part in the conduct of per: a helmet under the crest,

the Monthly Review ;" * and the EdiMotto, Prudens Simplicitas.

tor begs to state that this was not the " In librum Psalmorum. Summi laus et amor Jebovæ,

Aug, 10, 1816.
Christi victima, sermo, sceptrum,
Sancti Pneumatis aura et arrha,

To the Editor of the Monthly Review. Spirant his celebrata in Odis,

SIR, Moy, June 25, 1816. Spirant his animata in Odis.

I yesterday met with your Review for Res estæ veteres docentur,

October 1815, in which you are pleased Prædicantur item futuræ,

to make observations on Papers of mine, Præsentes placidè feruntur, Labrorum vituli offeruntur,

on the subject of FIORIN GRASS, published Interni gemitus cientur.

some two or three years ago by the Bath Castæ dulce melos Sionis,

Agricultural Society.

The style in which you comment, is Armaturaque militantis,

so different from that I am used to Permistæ Lacrymæ, Precesq; His exercita Spes, Fidesq;

meet with, that I shall treat you with

an attention and a respect kam not in His exercita Charitasq; Praxis relligionis ipsa, Crisis relligionis writers who criticize my Essays..

the habit of paying to anonymous

Your object seems merely to inform His incensaq; et evocata Depuratæ animæ medulla,

your readers;—your mention of me is Cordis viscera, mentis æstus,

generally flattering, and when you differ

from me it is with civility, and even Gliscunt enthea, et invalescunt

tenderness. Hymnis extimulata sacris.

I shall therefore endeavour to second Regni vim patientis alta Scandunt claustra, premunt Olympum

your intentions by enabling you to give

further information to your readers, Instanti quatiuntq; lucta. Cælos Empyrios penetrant,

more especially upon the points on which Ipsum porro Deum lacessunt

you yourself seem to entertain some

doubts. Hymnis ejaculata sacris;

You are so kind as to say: That the Hymnis sanctificata sacris.

evidence of so respectable and enlight-, Hæc magni resonant Davidis Regis fatidici, supremi

ened a man as Dr. Richardson, ought to Cordati ex animo Jehovæ,

induce practical Farmers in England, to

make a fair trial of the Fiorin.” Psaltis melliflui Israëlis

So it has; but I boldly say, in no one Psalmi, summa, synopsis, index,

instance that has reached me, with a Psalmi Biblia Bibliorum.

strict observance of the rules I have ROB'TUS NAUNTONIUS."

laid down, for the cultivation of a new

vegetable, and which I myself learned THE Editor of the MONTHLY RE. by a diligent attention for years to the to Mr. Urban, and will thank him to differing in both, as well as in its periods, insert, in his respoctable and widely by man-Rules which the experience of

from those of any other yet cultivated circulating Work, the inclosed communication from the Rev. Dr. Rich

ten years has fully demonstrated to me, ardson, of Moy, in Ireland. The luxuriance and value of this favourite

to be essentially necessary to secure the curiosity and probable importance of of mine. the subject would have induced the

You proceed, “. Dr. Richardson is Editor to give ready insertion to this fully aware that the great point be is repaper in the Correspondence of the quired to establish, is not the suitableMonthly Review, had not its extent ness of Fiorin to all soils, but its ABSQforbidden : but he hopes that a simi

LUTE VALUE.” lar inducement will procure a place

The suitableness of Fiorin to all soils for it in the Gentleman's Magazine, is a quality of more importance than where the same objection may not you seem to think, and its aptitude for apply.

all climates and all elevations, of far The Editor of the Monthly Re- greater ; for the grand desideratum in view takes this opportunity of re

all frozen Northern latitudes is, provenferring to a late paragraph in the Gen

der for their winter cattle; - and in Meman's Magazine, recording the * Supplement to Part I. p. 635.

parched

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parched tropical climates, succulent the number of my annual inspectors, food for their domestic animals, when and of course iny witnesses in support all verdure vanishes.

of your favourite test, ABSOLUTE VALUE. Now at this moment, and for four My summer residence bas been for months to come, Fiorin may be seen many years near the Giant's Causeway, growing in great luxuriance on my own an object of much curiosity, and visited demesne at Clonfeele, on many varieties by hundreds every summer. For several of soil, from light dry thin upland years past my Fiorin crops, and the far grounds, to deep miry morass, on a sur superior crops of my friend and neighface not twelve inches higher than the bour, Mr. M.Naghten, our late County contiguous perpetually stagnant water. Representative, have been considered

That Fiorin suits Northern latitudes, as part of the curiosities of the country, is established by the exultation of the and regularly visited by most strangers, DANES, who have already cultivated who never fail to express their astonishFiorin extensively, and are profuse in ment at the immense fleece they see on their expressions of gratitude in our our grounds : hence I am furnished with own Papers, for the introduction of a a cloud of witnesses, of all ranks, from vegetable, whose surprizing produce has OUR VICEROY down to the solitary wanmade (as they say) a new era in the dering Naturalist, ready to establish Agricultural History of DENMARK. your great point, the absolute value of

The NEWFOUNDLANDERS have begun Fiorin. (as appears from the St. John's Gazette) I shall mention but one witness by to cultivate Fiorin under my directions ; name, trusting that both the agriculand when Russia sent a Scavant to me, tural celebrity of the gentleman, and to consult me on the introduction of his opportunities for informing himself this grass into the UKRAIN, where they on tiis subject, will plead my excuse. much want winter fodder, after giving Mr. CURWEN would not believe the the best advice I could, I strove to first accounts he received of the extraordivert their attention to ARCHANGEL, dinary properties of Fiorin, and avowed where I was more secure of success. himself an enemy; at length he was

As to tropical climates, I have the converted by the immense Fiorin crops authority of Col. Wilkes, who cultivated of GENERAL DIROM, at Annan ; hę insix Aeres of Fiorin at MADRA$, for say- stantly determined to retract bis errors, ing, that bis numerous cattle were fed and invited me to be present. I attended, on the most succulent herbage, while was received with much respect, as well bis neighbours were scraping up grass as kindness, and acquired a most valuroots for theirs. The Colonel's example able friend to myself, as well as to the is followed at CALCUTTA, and he has

Fiorin cauşe. since cultivated Fiorin in ST. HELENA Mr. CURWEN has since returned my with complete success.

visit, examined my Fiorin crops both at Still I must agree with you that " AB

CLONFEELE and PORTRUSH, as well as SOLUTE VALUE” is the grand object, and those of my friends and pupils, the in my opportunities for establishing this BISHOP OF Derry, and Mr. M‘NAGHTEN; criterion, I have been singularly fortu he bas himself measured and weighed in nate, nothing wanting but an unpreju- different places, and authorizes me to diced tribunal.

say, he found amounts to the full as The ABSOLUTE VALUE of my Fiorin great as I ever had stated. crops at my usual residence, where they When you gave so much importance exceed 20 acres, has been reported upon to the question of ABSOLUTE VALUE, I by the NoBILITY, PRELATES, and GENTRY, could not resist the opportunity of bringof my own Country, who have been so ing forward the testimony of a Gentlekind as to come to inspect them; by man of such respectability, and so comthe persons sent officially from different petent a judge of the question.

AGRICULTURAL Societies in IRELAND, You quote at some length passages 19 SCOTLAND, and Man, for the same pur. from my Memoir in which I state my

pose,--and more especially by the liberal Fiorin crops to have run from five to 5. premiums granted by the Bath Society, seven, and even to eight tons of hay,

by the Highland Society of Scotland, but where I say, “ that having by pracand the FARMING SOCļETY of IRELAND, tice become better acquainted with this to the most successful Candidates in grass, and having carried its culture raising great crops of Fiorin; and I have into more favourable ground, I hope the satisfaction to add, that my own next year to reach ten tons,"-you can Fiorin crops never looked so well as this contain yourself no longer, but exclaim, year, and will be presentable for four " is not this too sanguine an expectamoritbs to come.

tion? Ten tons per acre no farmer ever Accident has prodigiously increased expected to reap so if this could be

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accomplished, who would not cry out, an intermediate stage between wet and Fiorin for ever ?"

dry." Yet the very next year my expccta Here I am totally misunderstood; and tions were fulfilled. Col. KNOX of the

as the singularity in my practice of hayDonegall Militia, after measuring and making (greatly magnified) has much weighing with much care, found my impeded the adoption of this new grass, crop to exceed ten tons dry bay to the I shall set you and the world right on English acre ; and last year MAJOR

that point. MONROE, and CAPTAIN MʻKENZIE of the The difference between common sward, Ross and Sutherland, found eleven and Fiorin sward, when fresh cut, is tons nine hundred; Lieut. ELLISON very great; the former dead matter, found a still greater crop in another wbile every stalk of the latter is animaplace; and from the appearance of my ted by the principle of life; common Fiorin at this early season, I answer for sward runs rapidly into putrefaction, it, my crops shall in the ensuing Octo. while Fiorin sward is protected from it ber exceed your ten tons in different by the antiseptic powers of animation. places, some of them of a very worthless The practice of converting each sward description.

into preservable hay, is governed by this Now, Sir, that I have fulfilled my difference: the saver of common sward promise of ten tons to the acre, do you hastens to get rid, by evaporation, of all expect that your countrymen will make atmospheric moisture, and as much of good yours, and cry out Fiorin for ever ? the vegetable juices as would accelerate -Not they; Nil admirari seems a strong fermentation and putrefaction; while I, trait in the English character; and in no baste to get rid of the atmospheric were the more enlightened Agricultur- moisture (from whose mischief I am ists willing to make the experiment, protected) strive to retain as much of their Bailiffs could not be induced to my vegetable juices as I can, that they submit to new rules of culture, as if may concoct and increase the nutricious. they required instruction. It is to these qualities of the hay; hence the solidity, gentry the failure of most attempts to density, and extraordinary weight of cultivate Fiorin is owing, and I appeal Fiorin Hay. to the gentlemen who have actually Now for my practice, which whoever obtained premiums 'froin the Bath So do not chuse to adopt, may with great CIETY for their Fiorin crops, if the value security save their Fiorin as if it was of these very crops bas not been reduced, common bay. and their success endangered, by the The day I mow, I put my sward, wet doggedness of their Bailiffs.

or dry, into small spherical lapcocks, so enthusiastic is Dr. some twelve or sixteen pound weight; Richardson in his recommendation of after four, five, or six days, I change Fiorin, and so singular in his practice, their positions, and turn their bases to that we seem to be reading a farming the wind; after four or five days more, Romance."

I open, air them, and put them into You here allude to my custom of mow wbat we call Shake Cocks, from 200 pounds ing, and making Hay through the whole to 350; the hay or sward is put up loosely winter, which I admit I bave done un. with a fork, and not trampled down. interruptedly for seven years in the face Now we have our material in the inof the world. But I must not allow you termediate stage you mention, between to call this my Practice of HAYMAK- grass and hay; excellent fodder, but in ING; the fact is, that five-sixths of my this state we never weigh, nor call it hay, erop is mowed in October, and made up but it will in these cocks stand safely in nearly in the common way as dry store the field for months. hay; but I find both convenience and The next, and last step, reduces it to amusement, in reserving a pittance for common hay, preservable for years; mowing tbrough the winter ; - part for in a dry day we transfer five, six,, or seven green food, while for bravado I make up of these shake-cocks into one trampthe rest-into dry bay with great facility cock, well trodden down, conical form, in some conspicuous place.

and narrowed base. Here Fiorin has a I must observe also another pas- striking advantage over common hay, sage of yours, very likely to mislead, for we often see this abused and injured which I am sure is not your inten- by exposure in the field in a, wet Aution.

tumn, while a Fiorin cock will brave the “ When the Doctor speaks of making weather until May, without the slightest his Fiorin into bay, it is to be remem- injury. bered that this grass is not reduced to To proceed, you say, “ Fiorin is Dr. that state of dryness which is caused by Richardson's Hobby Horse, and be sure. our old-fashioned bay-making, but to ly rides it most hobbyhorsically,"

Most

You say,

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Most people disown their Hobbies, and vegetable, of which the English Farmers none of them are believed; I shall on are now as enthusiastic admirers as Dr. the contrary admit, and justify mine, LETTSOM himself. producing you as my first advocate Whether the goud Doctor has lived to for when you avow that a grass giving enjoy this triumph, I know not; but ten tons of hay to the acre, should make upon due consideration 1 determined your grave countrymen cry out Fiorin thirty years to be rather more than I for ever, you surely justify the discoverer could afford to wait ; giving up therefor mounting it as his Hobby, when he fore all hopes of obtaining the best poshas actually passed your standard for sible testimony in favour of my discotwo successive years, and now pledges very, that of the English Farmers, himself again to exceed it in the ensuing I resolved to be satisfied with a seconda October ; and on grounds of wortbless rate description of evidence, and applied description.

to the Scotch, Welsh, Manks, and Irish And is he not farther justified for rid- Farmers; and having ascertained the ing hobbyhorsically (to adopt your lan success of their experiments on Fiorin guage) when it appears that this same Grass, loaded with their gratitude, and grass, which had escaped the notice of decorated by their honours, as you say, man for 5000 years, is the only vegetable I went off at score. indigenous to our Islands, that bas been

W. RICHARDSON, D.D. found worthy of a place within the pale of cultivation ?

MR. URBAN,

Aug. 13. And that this stranger at home, who VOUR last Number, in common bas not yet been able to find admission with some other Monthly Pub. among the favourites (not one of them lications, contains critical observanatives) upon whom the whole labour of

tions by Mr. Britton on the Monu. the agricultural world is expended, pro

inental Bust of Shakspeare at Stratduces crops every year successively, each of them, separately, of more value ford, preparatory to its being enthan any of the crops yielded at intervals graved. It is almost too late to moby the most valuable of these intruders;

ralize on the self-delusion prevailiog for what crop of wbeat could reach the in all literary projects, wherein the value of ten tons of superlative hay?

Author or Editor is blind to every One excuse more for riding, which is, thing unfavourable to his subject, that this elève of mine, whom I am un

and overleaps every impediment to able to press into the service of the the propriety of his project. One knowing Agriculturists of your country, fatality generally accompanies this is not limited to their territories; he persuasion, namely, that'of carrying takes a wider range, luxuriates equally the argument so far as to wound the on the mountain and in the valley, and prejudices, and excite the hostility, of produces his valuable crops in the bleak partizans of other opinions. l. a est regions, into which the boldest Agri- 'very convenient and equally elegant culturist darés not venture his more ten

edition of Shakspeare's Plays, printed der favourites. You tell

me,

“ He might have waited by Whittingham, under the superin. for the experiments of English Farmers, tendance of Mr. Britton, a copy is before he had gone off at score."

given of the Bust of the great Bard Waited, -bow long?-HORACE presses

from his Monument at Stratford; and pretty heavily on the patience of an Au an opinion is therein pretty confithor or Discoverer, coming forward with dently expressed by Mr. Brilton, of something new, from which he expects that head being indubitably the most to derive celebrity; he says,

authentic and probable “ likeness of Nonum prematur in annum. the Poet.” Mr. Britton appears, like To nine years I might have submitted, Pyginalion, to bave contemplated his but I well knew the tardy reluctance of image till he has become enamoured English Farmers to receive any thing of it, and since the publication of new. I saw my predecessor, Dr. LETT- Whittingham's Shakspeare in 1814, SOM, bring forward, in a clear and satis

to have liberally resolved that the factory manner, the high value and importance of his protege, Mangel Wurtzell: world should share his passion. A he pressed the adoption of this succulent print of the Stratford Monument upon and saccharine root by the English Agri

a larger scale is now proposed, and culturists ; but all in vain, they were

claims are urged in various quarters perfectly satisfied with their turnip, loudly challenging subscription to the rape, and oil-cake milk.

Stratford Bust as the only likeness of Thirty years elapsed before any im the “gentle Shakspeare.” Mr. Britpression could be made in favour of a ton, by whoin these pretensions are

urged,

urged, is too well read not to know of Shakspeare he“ imitated nature that other claims are preferred, and most abominably,” it will not avail that they are such as cannot be re Mr. Britton's argument. Jonson was jected without plausible reasons. familiarly acquainted with ShaksWhether the reasons assigned by the peare for not less than 20 years; and Artist will warrant us in henceforth with Droeshout's engraving before rejecting what has been received as him he (from long personal knowthe vera effigies of Shakspeare, and ledge) pledges his veracity to the setting up the Stratford Bust in its world for the resemblance; and this stead, must (I think) be doubted. while many thousands were yet living, Every portrait collector, ---an ignoble who, if his affirmation were incorrace, -- is aware that the earliest en rect, wanted neither the ability nor graved head of Shakspeare forms part the inclination to contradict him. of the title-page of the first folio Jonson might, as Steevens suggests, edition of the Poet.- Prefixed to have no particular intimacy with the this portrait are the following pleas. graphic art, but it will (I take it) be ing lipes, addressed to the Reader, never found that a man of great by his food and faithful companion general talent is insensible to the comand friend Ben Jonson :

parative merit of a work of art, JonThis figure that thou here seest put,

son saw that the portrait of his be, It was for gentle Shakspeare cut;

loved Shakspeare, notwithstanding the Wherein the graver had a strife

insufficiency of the engraver, was a With Nature to out-do the life.

strong resemblance of his friend, and O could he but have drawn his wit he troubled not himself with mechaAs well in brass as he hath hit

nical proportions. With submission His face, the print would then surpass to so grave an authority as Mr. Brit. All that was ever writ in brass;

ton, I think it would be more seemly But since he cannot, reader, look

not to talk of Ben Jonson's authority Not on his Picture but his Book.]

as being “ futile and unworthy of Of the portrait, thus authenticated, credit," at least till some one could be Mr.Britton says,

“It would not be diffi- pointed out with equal pretensions as cult to show, to the satisfaction of io talents, learning, and judgment. every impartial reader, that there is In contravention of such authority nothing like proof(iadeed!) oor scarce- derived from the most satisfactory ly probability in the genuineness (“ a personal knowledge, what bas Mr. vile phrase") of any of the paintings Britton to urge in favour of the Strat. or prints that have come before the ford Bust? I speak here of evidence; publick as portraits of our unrivalled for the flashes about "

eyes and una Bard. That by Droeshout cannot be derstandings, the attestations of tralike ang human face, for it is evidently. dition and the consecrations of tiine," ill drawn in all the features, and a are so many figments of a poetical bad artist can never make a good fancy, and, as far as the authenticity likeness. Da such a print Jonson's of the likeness is concerned,“ are baselines are futile and unworthy of less as the fabric of a vision.” credit.” I have no inclination, Mr Here is Mr. Britton's summary of Urban, to consume your pages in ex- evidence: “ Leonard Digges, in a amining the propriety of Mr. Britton's Poem praising the works and worth axioms thus laid down in imitation of of Shakspeare,” - of whose worth,

short-lunged Seneca." But, in few by the bye, abstracted from his works, words, I believe them to be unfaithe Digges says not a word, Digges's ful. Nothing, I believe, is more Poem, published within seven years common than to meet with a good after Shakspeare's death, speaks of likeness unequally executed as a work the Stratford Monument, as a wellof art; unless it be to see a bighly kaown object. Dugdale, in his · Antifinished head wanting the character quities of War wickshire,' 1656, give which is the essence of a likeness. a plate of the Monument, but drawn Few likenesses are more perceptible and engraved in a truly tasteless and and eveo striking than what are usu- inaccurate style ; and observes in the ally denominated caricatures, in text, that the Poet was famous, and which every line is surcharged, and thus entitled to such distinction. every feature distorted. Drocshout Langbaine, in his. Account of English hus some excellent specimens of art; Dramatic Poets,' 1691, pronounces -but, if it be admitted that in the case the Stratford Bust Shakspeare's true

effigies'.

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