Page images
PDF
EPUB

.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors]

"Warks of Sterling Merit, in elegant style, and at incredibly lom Prire."

OY

STANDARD AND ATTRACTIVE WORKS,

FOR TRAVELLERS AND THE FIRESIDE.

[merged small][ocr errors]

The distinctive characteristics of this series are:-
I. A REGULAR PERIODICAL ISSUE, MAILABLE LIKE THE MAGA

ZINES.
II.-GOOD PAPER, GOOD " PRINT," AND PORTABLE FORM, BOTH

FOR TRAVELLERS POCKETS, AND TO BIND FOR THE LI

BRARY.
III.-BOOKS THAT ARE WORTH READING AND WORTH PRESERVING.
IV.-A LARGE AMOUNT OF READING FOR A SMALL PRICE.

The Publisher proposes, in this Series, to try the experiment of giving very good Books at a very low price so low a price, indeed, that a very large sale only can make it remunerative.

The form, the size of the type, the quality of the paper, and the character of the Works themselves, are such as are calculated to be acceptable to those who, in search of intellectual entertainment, either at home or abroad, will prefer á readable and legibly printed Library Book, to a small-type, double-column, temporary pamphlet.

In the selection of Books for this series it is intended to combine amusement with utility. Standard and original books of Travel, History, Biography, Domestic Economy, and Social Philosophy, will be interspersed with lighter and humorous works, such as those of the inimitable Hood, combining cheerful philosophy, true humanity

and mirth-moving wit. Each volume forming from 200 to 275 pages, in stiff paper covers, price 25 sents each. Yearly subscription $5-giving 24 volumes at one-third the usual cost, about 6,000 pages.

The Series may also be had in cloth, at 40 cents per volume, or $9 a year.

VOLUMES ALREADY PUBLISHED.

1. Home and Social Philosophy:

Or Chapters on Every-day Topics From “Household Words." Edited by
CHARLES DIJKENS. 12mo., 264 pages.

" This work contains a vast sund of useful information upon scientific subjects, as ap pid to the every day affairs of life."-Star of the North.

Es These volumes will meet a want long and widely felt by families, schools, and indivi. duals. We cannot recommend them too earnestly to the public generally."-Chris. Chroni.

Home and Social Philosophy' embraces eighteen articles from Dickens's 'Household Words,' calculated to illustrate, in a familiar manner, various subjects in domestic and social economy, natural philosophy, and kindred topics."-Schenectady Cabinet.

" Few enterprises of this kind present more attractive features at the outset than this of the 'Semi-Monthly, Library.' The first number contains such selections from Dickens's *Iousehold Words' as relate more directly to domestic and social economy. The essays are pithy, entertaining, and valuable, and it will hardly be possible to select a greater variety of choice reading at so chuap a price as this and the subsequent volumes promise."--Hunt's Merchants' Mag.

" It is quite a good idea in the publisher of this volume to select those papers of the Household Words, that have a similarity of subject, and republish them in one volume The selections are made with judgment, and the work is neatly got up."-Hartford Courant.

11. Whimsicalities. By Thomas Hood. With Woodcuts.

“We have before alluded, in the highest terms of commendation, to Mr. Putnam's New Library; we have spoken of the judicious selections he has made for its pages, of the beau. tilul mechanical execution, and the unexampled cheapness of the work. Since this notice a notable addition has been made—that little treasury of humor, entitled • Whimsicalities,' by Hood." -- Home Journal.

“It contains some of his happiest sketches, rich ir that off-hand, effective humor in which no other author of our literature has approached him, and displaying a keen appreciation of the comical features of human nature which gives zést to all his writings, whether prose or poetry.- Illustrated Family Friend.

“The whimsicalities of Hood are unequalled in point of humor and good sense."--Savannah Republican.

" It is a choice selection of rich and racy productions of a comical genius, with many humorous illustrations."-Star of the North.

"Brimfull of that genuine and profound fun that has immortalized the author."-Lowville Journal.

Whimsicalities,' by the inimitable Hood, is embellished with a number of character. istic cuts, and comprises some of the most laughter-provoking papers of their gifted author. Deliciously comic-yet is there no fear that you will only laugh at Thomas Hood's jesting; there is a deeper philosophy in his mirthfulness, than is apparent at a glance; heart-truths of saddest meaning lurking amid his most ludicrous creations. Some of these whimsicalities might, at a pinch, serve the purpose of a sermon."--Sartain's Magazine.

[ocr errors]

Walks and Talks of an American Farmer in Eng

land. By FRED. L. OLMSTED. With Woodcuts.

• An original work, giving a very clear and very clever, as well as interesting, account of visits to English farms and country places, by a sensible, observant, and reliable American agriculturist- Mr. Olmsted. The book is full of information most agreeably conveyed.”. Home Journal.

" A charmingly written insight into the ways of the English million.” -- Lowville Jour. "An unpretending and delightful narrative."-So. Lit. Messenger.

“We have read this volume with considerable interest, for it is a view of England taken from a different point from any which we have before seen. It is not only in that respect original, but it contains much good sense and reflection, without any pretence to any fine writing. Its aim is to instruct, and this object is effected in a pleasant manner. The writer has much love for nature, old buildings, ivy, and the constituents of English scenery, but does not possess the power of description which has characterized the works of some of the cele. brated American describers of England's glories."--Newark Advertiser.

“ The author has seasoned his rural narrative most judiciously, with brief descriptions of some of the old castles, parks, halls, furniture, &c. It is a delightful book every way.”New England Farmer.

"This is a narrative of an actual tour on foot in England, by an American Farmer, and is written in a pleasant and interesting style. There are few, very few, new books of these days which possess any merit at all to be compared with this. The author has not only sr 9 the outside of English' life-the palaces and grandeur, and magnificent sights--but he 1 is mixed with the people in the lovel as well as the palace, and seen misery as well as maoni. ficence. He has been a good observer of men and manners, and has told his tale wsh a ready pen."-Star of the North.

* It is many a day since we have encountered a book written with so healthy an enthusiasm, containing so much useful and interesting information.”--Commonwealth.

“The American farmer is a very clever and observing fellow."'-- Atheneum.

“A great deal may be learned from it of the opinions and dispositions of our lower classes which few English writers would like to state, even if they knew it. He is, on the whole, we think, one of the best observers from the new country who has yet visited the old, and known how to appreciate it."-Economist.

"Cohbett said tho only way to see England properly was by rambling on foot over the hills and along the dales, and from the fresh and graphic records Mr Nimated has given us, we are inclined to think he is correct in his opinions." - The Plas.

(Hunt)

« PreviousContinue »