Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening

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Theophrastus Publishers, 1859 - Landscape gardening - 592 pages
 

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Page 69 - Consult the genius of the place in all: That tells the waters or to rise or fall; Or helps the ambitious hill the heavens to scale, Or scoops in circling theatres the vale ; Calls in the country, catches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades; Now breaks, or now directs, the intending lines; Paints, as you plant, and, as you work, designs.
Page 358 - All things to man's delightful use: the roof Of thickest covert, was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus and each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall, each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Reared high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more coloured than with stone Of costliest emblem: other creature...
Page 250 - Pine lie in the northern parts of the Union ; and the geographical range of this tree is comprised chiefly between New York and the 47th degree of north latitude, it being neither capable of resisting the fierce heat of the south, nor the intense cold of the extreme northern regions. In Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, the White Pine abounds in various situations, adapting itself to every variety of soil, from dry, gravelly upland, to swamps constantly wet. Michaux measured two trunks near the...
Page 177 - There a sweet and highly nutritious flour is prepared from them, which makes a delicious bread. Large quantities of the fruit are therefore annually collected in those countries, and dried and stored away for the winter's consumption. Old Evelyn says, "the bread of the flour is exceedingly nutritive ; it is a robust food, and makes women well complexioned, as I have read in a good author. They also make fritters of chestnut flour, which they wet with rose-water, and sprinkle with grated parmigans,...
Page 112 - On the other hand, the mixture of trees that exactly correspond in their forms, if these forms, as in oblong or drooping trees, are similar will infallibly create sameness. In order then to produce beautiful variety which shall neither on the one side run into confusion, nor on the other verge into monotony, it is requisite to give some little attention to the harmony of form and color in the composition of trees in artificial plantations. The only rules which we can suggest to govern the planter...
Page 23 - Indeed many of the gardens on the continent are more striking from their numerous sculpturesque ornaments, interspersed with fountains and jets-d'eau, than from the beauty or rarity of their vegetation, or from their arrangement. In the United States, it is highly improbable that we shall ever witness such splendid examples of landscape gardens as those abroad, to which we have alluded. Here the rights of man are held to be equal...
Page 112 - ... leading expression is desired in a group of trees, together with as great a variety as possible, such species must be chosen as harmonize with each other in certain leading points. And, secondly, in occasionally intermingling trees of opposite characters, discordance may be prevented, and harmonious expression promoted, by interposing other trees of an intermediate character. In the first case, suppose it is desired to form a group of trees, in which gracefulness must be the leading expression....
Page 274 - ... are acquainted. It possesses not only very fine dark green palmated foliage in great abundance, but the foliage has that agreeable property of being evergreen, — which, while it enhances its value tenfold, is at the same time so rare among vines. The yellow flowers of the Ivy are great favorites with bees, from their honied sweetness ; they open in autumn, and the berries ripen in the spring. When planted at the root of a tree, it will often, if the head is not too thickly clad with branches,...
Page 65 - ... directly up to the house. Such a view can never appear a satisfactory whole, because we experience a confusion of sensations in contemplating it. There is an evident incongruity in bringing two modes of arranging plantations, so totally different, under the eye at one moment, which distracts, rather than pleases the mind. In this example, the avenue, taken by itself, may be a beautiful object, and the groups and connected masses may, in themselves, be elegant, yet if the two portions are seen...
Page 318 - Architectural beauty must be considered conjointly with the beauty of the landscape or situation. Buildings of almost every description, and particularly those for the habitation of man, will be considered by the mind of taste, not only as architectural objects of greater or less merit, but as component parts of the general scene; united with the surrounding lawn, embosomed in tufts of trees and...

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