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WASHINGTON, July 1, 1861–1.30 p. m.

(Received 10 p. m.) Lieutenant-General GRANT, City Point, Va.:

On the 28th [29th] I telegraphed to General Hunter, granting his request to visit Washington, and directing him in the meanwhile to telegraph to you about his operations. Since then I have heard nothing of him, the line west of Harper's Ferry having been broken by rebel raids. I telegraphed him to-day that you wished to consult with him at your headquarters. As you are aware, all batteries here were dismounted and put in the forts, to replace in part the heavy regiments, and their horses sent to the front. I have remounted three and sent them forward, and will remount five more by taking horses from the quartermaster's teams. This leaves very little in the forts, except militia, who are not sufficiently instructed to work the guns. There are conflicting reports about the rebel forces in the Shenandoah Valley. Some say that Breckinridge and Pickett are following the cavalry, which has just made a raid on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, while others say they are not in the Valley at all. It certainly would be good policy for them (while Hunter's army is on the Kanawha) to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and make a raid in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Sigel has very little besides militia at Harper's Ferry and on the railroad, and, by sending away the artillery, we shall have nothing left here with which to re-enforce him.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

SPECIAL ORDERS, WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 225.

Washington, July 1, 1864.

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54. Capt. Elmer Otis, Fourth U. S. Cavalry, is hereby relieveil from mustering and disbursing duty in the State of Ohio, and detailed for duty as acting inspector-general of cavalry for the Department of West Virginia, and will report by letter, without delay, to the chief of the Cavalry Bureau for instructions.

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By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Charleston, W. Va., July 1, 1861. Brigadier-General SULLIVAN, Loup Creek:

GENERAL: You will bring your command on to Camp Piatt, with as little delay as possible, where it will embark on board steamers for Gallipolis, taking with them sufficient cooked rations for the journey. * As soon as you get your command at Camp Piatt the major-general commanding would be glad if you would report in person to him at Charleston. Please acknowledge receipt of this order by telegram. By command of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Charleston, W. Va., July 1, 1864. Maj. Gen. JULIUS STAHEL,

Commanding, &c., Martinsburg, W. Va.:
Your telegrams have been received. You must act promptly and
do the best you can for the protection of the railroad.
By command of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Charleston, W. Va., July 1, 1864. Maj. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL,

Comdg. Reserve Division, &c., Martinsburg, W. Va.: Major-General Stahel should certainly be able with the large force under his command to protect the railroad and drive the enemy up the Valley. If more troops be, in your judgment, absolutely needed, you must telegraph for them directly to the Secretary of War. Sullivan's division is en route to Martinsburg, but you cannot hope for them before five or six days. By command of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE.
Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Martinsburg, W. Va., July 1, 1864. Maj. T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General: MAJOR: I have the honor to state for the information of the major-general commanding that there is no big spring near the Charlestown road three miles from Martinsburg. The only point in that direction where sufficient water can be found for men and horses is at the Opequon Creek. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JUL. STAHEL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Martinsburg, W. Va., July 1, 1864. Maj. T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg, W. Va.: MAJOR: General Stahel directs me to state that there is no spring on the Charlestown road three miles from Martinsburg. He has therefore ordered a portion of the cavalry to Newcomer's Mills, on the Opequon Creek, about three miles from town. Pickets will be stationed so as to guard all the roads between Newcomer's Mills and the Winchester turnpike. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EZRA H. BAILEY, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

MARTINSBURG, July 1, 1864-3.30 p. m.

(Received 3.50 p. m.) Brig. Gen. MAX WEBER,

Harper's Ferry: General Stahel reports 200 of the enemy's cavalry encamped two miles from Winchester, on Berryville road. Mosby's command is said to be at Millwood.

T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FREDERICK, MD., July 1, 1864. ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Reserve Division, Department of IVest Virginia : SIR: There has been some information of a reliable character received in this place indicating a probable attack upon Martinsburg Saturday night or Sunday by the rebels. It seems that this information has been given some lady near this place, who has a husband in the rebel army, with the request that she should be in Martinsburg on Saturday evening, July 2, as her husband would certainly be there on Sunday, July 3, when the railroad between Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry would be destroyed. It may be a hoax, but I thought it best to impart the information to you. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. I. YELLOTT, Major, Commanding Post, and Provost-Marshal.

CUMBERLAND, July 1, 1864. Colonel STEVENSON,

Greenland Gap: Send a scout of 200 infantry and all available cavalry on a scout to Moorefield and Petersburg. You must keep yourself fully advised of the whereabouts of McNeill and report to me often.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, July 1, 1864-9.30 a. m. Colonel Hoy,

New Creek : Keep scouts out all the time in the neighborhood of Reese's and Doll's Gap.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, }

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS, MID. DEPT. STH ARMY CORPS,

.

Baltimore, July 1, 1864. ! It having come to the knowledge of the general commanding that an extra tour of guard duty is imposed upon enlisted men as a punishment for offenses, he desires hereby to express his disapproval of the same. Guard duty is one of the most honorable, as well as one of the most important, duties of a soldier, and must never be regarded in the light of a punishment, but rather as a privilege and a mark of distinction. Regulations require that all persons of whatever rank in the service shall observe respect toward sentinels. It is manifestly improper, therefore, that respect should be shown to those deserving punishment. It is wisely provided that sentinels should be relieved at short intervals, in order that they may by necessary rest be enabled to perform their duty while on post with greater vigilance; yet this extra tour of duty is designed to fatigue them, thereby rendering them careless and inefficient, and defeating entirely the intentions of the service. The practice, therefore, has a tendency to degrade a highly honorable calling, and must be discontinued in this department. The inspecting officers of this army corps are hereby directed to report promptly any violation of this order. By command of Major-General Wallace:

SAMUEL B. LAWRENCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., July 2, 1864.

(Via Cairo Sth. Received 12.10 p. m. Sth.) Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff: The First Division of the Nineteenth Army Corps, 6,200 strong, is arriving and will be embarked in the course of the night. They will reach Fort Monroe from the Sth to the 10th, This employs all the sea-going vessels we have here. The Second Division, 6,000 strong, will be in readiness to sail as soon as other vessels arrive. The sick of the regiments will be sent to New York, with the exception of those who will be fit for duty in twenty days; these last will follow their regiments to Fort Monroe.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General.

JULY 2, 1864. General AUGUR :

Lieutenant-General Grant directs that only three of the eight batteries be sent to the front at present. The other five can be organized and ready to move as occasion may require.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

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2. Companies E and F, Eighteenth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, having reported at these headquarters, will proceed without delay to Laurel, Md., and relieve two companies of the Sixth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, now guarding the Washington and Baltimoro Railroad. The commanding officer will receive his instructions from the commanding oflicer detachment Veteran Reserve Corps. The quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.

3. Upon being relieved by two companies of the Eighteenth Regiment Veteran Reserve, Corps, the two companies of the Sixth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, now at Laurel, Md., will proceed at once to this city, and report to the commanding oflicer of their reyiment for duty. The quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.

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By command of Major-General Augur:

C. H. RAYMOND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WASHINGTON, 22D ARMY CORPS,

July 2, 1861. COMMANDING OFFICER UNION LIGHT GUARD,

(Through Colonel Wisewell, Military Governor): CAPTAIN : The major-general directs that you transfer your command to the Soldiers' Home, and that hereafter you be in readiness to send an escort with the President of the United States, on his trips to this city and returning. The strength of these escorts will be designated by His Excellency the President. I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. RAYMOND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF WASHINGTON, 220 ARMY CORPs,

July 2, 1864. COMMANDING OFFICER, Company K, One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Vols.,

(Through Colonel Wisewell, Military Governor :) SIR : The major-general commanding directs that you transfer your command to the vicinity of Soldiers" Home, where your duties will be to perform the same duty relative to the summer residence of His Excellency the President of the United States as you have heretofore done at the Executive Mansion in this city. Upon application to the quartermaster's department (Lieutenant-Colonel Greene) you will be furnished with the necessary transportation. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. RAYMOND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, July 2, 1864—10.30 a. m. Major-General HUNTER,

West Virginia : General Grant says that such of your forces as are not required to hold the Kanawha Valley should be brought back to the line of the

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