Trust Within Reason

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 5, 1998 - Philosophy - 170 pages
Some philosophers hold that trust grows fragile when people become too rational. They advocate a retreat from reason and a return to local, traditional values. Others hold that truly rational people are both trusting and trustworthy. Everything hinges on what we mean by 'reason' and 'rational'. If these are understood in an egocentric, instrumental fashion, then they are indeed incompatible with trust. With the help of game theory, Martin Hollis argues against that narrow definition and in favour of a richer, deeper notion of reason founded on reciprocity and the pursuit of the common good. Within that framework he reconstructs the Enlightenment idea of citizens of the world, rationally encountering, and at the same time finding their identity in, their multiple commitments to communities both local and universal.
 

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Contents

THE PARADOX OF TRUST
1
TRUTH VIRTUE AND HAPPINESS
5
THE PROBLEM OF TRUST
10
THE ENLIGHTENMENT TRAIL
14
NATURES PARADOXICAL TASK
18
THE PERILS OF PRUDENCE
26
FEAR
29
SYMPATHY
37
CONTRACTARIANS
91
MORALITY IN TRUST
98
ALL IN THE GAME
105
ENLIGHTENMENT FOOTBALL
106
THE GAMES OF SOCIAL LIFE
110
REASON AND OBLIGATION
117
THE BOND OF SOCIETY
126
PROBLEMS OF COORDINATION
128

THE CENTIPEDES STING
44
THREE VIEWS ABOUT MORAL PSYCHOLOGY
47
CENTIPEDES AND BACKWARD INDUCTION
54
PRUDENCE IN PERIL
60
A REMEDY IN THE JUDGEMENT AND UNDERSTANDING?
63
PERILS OF STRATEGIC CHOICE
66
IMPARTIALITY AND FAIRNESS
71
FAIRNESS AND MORALITY
82
PLAYING FAIR WITH KANT
84
TEAMWORK
137
TRUST IN THE LIGHT OF REASON
143
RECIPROCITY
144
A REMARKABLE CHANGE IN MAN
150
THE MORAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCES
154
CITIZENS OF THE WORLD?
159
BIBLIOGRAPHY
164
INDEX
169
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