Practical Guide to Great Britain and Ireland: Preparation, Cost, Routes, Sight-seeing, Volume 1

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Page 106 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Page 186 - A stranger yet to pain ? I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow, As waving fresh their gladsome wing My weary soul they seem to soothe, And, redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 106 - ... to delegate to the merciless Indian the defence of disputed rights, and to wage the horrors of his barbarous war against our brethren ? My lords, these enormities cry aloud for redress and punishment. But, my lords, this barbarous measure has been defended, not only on the principles of policy and necessity, but also on those of morality ; " for it is perfectly allowable...
Page 216 - For there was no man knew from whence he came; But after tempest, when the long wave broke All down the thundering shores of Bude and Bos, There came a day as still as heaven, and then They found a naked child upon the sands Of dark Tintagil by the Cornish sea; And that was Arthur...
Page 200 - You drank of the Well I warrant betimes ? " He to the Cornishman said. But the Cornishman smiled as the stranger spake And sheepishly shook his head. " I hastened as soon as the Wedding was done And left my wife in the porch. But i' faith she had been wiser than me, For she took a bottle to Church ! " ' An interesting variation from the usual run of Wishing Wells is to be found in Denbighshire.
Page 181 - No, Sir ; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Page 99 - Our life is two-fold : Sleep hath its own world, A boundary between the things misnamed Death and existence : Sleep hath its own world, And a wide realm of wild reality. And dreams in their development have breath, And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy...
Page 208 - Life is a jest, and all things show it, I thought so once, but now I know it, with what more you may think proper.
Page 200 - A WELL there is in the west country, And a clearer one never was seen ; There is not a wife in the west country But has heard of the Well of St. Keyne.
Page 104 - As many days as in one year there be, So many windows in this church we see; As many marble pillars here appear As there are hours throughout the fleeting year; As many gates as moons one year does view — Strange tale to tell! yet not more strange than true.

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