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" Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet, oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ?... "
The Works - Page 71
by George Crabbe - 1823
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The Port Folio, Volume 3

Philadelphia (Pa.) - 1810
...that keep her "From her rest;" — With what feeling does he exclaim ! —"Cure her of that! " Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; " Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, " Haze out the written troubles of the brain; " And with some sweet oblivious antidote, " Cleanse the...
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Melancholy: As it Proceeds from the Disposition and Habit, the Passion of ...

Robert Burton - Melancholy - 1801 - 420 pages
...ENGLISH MALADY " - are traced from within '* Its inmost centre to its outmost skin." i .J Cari'stthou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the foul...
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Letters on Literature, Taste, and Composition, Addressed to His Son

George Gregory - Books and reading - 1809 - 363 pages
...I believe, ever found the following fine passage of Shakspeare too redundant in metaphor : ' Can'st thou not minister to a mind diseased ? Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ? ' Base out the living tablets of the brain ; And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the...
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Tales

George Crabbe - English poetry - 1812 - 398 pages
...Conscience Is but a kind of hard Conscience, The fiend gives the more friendly counsel. Merchant of Venice, Act II. Scene 2. Thou hast it now. ..and I...Act III, Scene 1. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted sinew, Rase out the written troubles of the brain, And with...
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The works of George Crabbe, Volume 4

George Crabbe - 1816
...of hanl Conscience, The fiend gives the more friendly counsel. Merchant of Venice, Act U. Scene *. Thou hast it now— and I fear Thou play'dst most foully for it. Mncheth, Act III. Scene ). Canst tbou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 44

England - 1838
...very clearly. A hollow voice addressed him while groping his way to the object of his visit,—" Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ?— Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, and cleanse the bosom of the perilous stuff that weighs upon the heart ?'' " Indigestion — a kind...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - 1821
...is troubled with thick-coming fancie*, That keep her from her rest. Macb. Cure her of that : Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow; Raze out the written troubles of the brain .. And, with some sweet oblivious amidote, Cleanse the stuff*...
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The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 18

English literature - 1822
...As she is troubled with thick coming fancies, That keep her from her rest. Cure her of that: Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Kase out the written troubles of the brain ; And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the foul...
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The Works of the Rev. George Crabbe: In Eight Volumes, Volume 5

George Crabbe - 1823
...hard Conscience. . . . The fiend gives the more friendly counsel. Merchant of Venice, Act I1. Scene S. Thou hast it now— and I fear Thou play'dst most foully for It. Macbeth, Act IIL Scene 1. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow. Rase...
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The Works of the Rev. George Crabbe, Volume 3

George Crabbe - English poetry - 1823
...fiend gives the more friendly counsel. Merchant of Venice, Act II. Scene 2. Thou hast it now—and I fear Thou play'dst most foully for it. Macbeth, Act III. Scene 1. Canst than not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Rase out the written troubles...
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