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worthie Plantations." He subscribes himself his Majesties well meaning and loyall subject,

ROBERT HAYMAN."

The following complimentary verses to the author, by the celebrated George Wither, seem worth preserving :

TO THE LOVERS OF THE MUSES UPON THESE

QUODLIBETS.

Why doe so many fondly dote upon
Parnassus, Tempe, and that Helicon,
Renowned by the Greeks? why praise they so
The muses haunting Tiber, Thame and Po,
As if no other hill, or grove, or spring,
Should yeeld such raptures as these forth did bring.
Behold even from these uncouth shores, among
Unpeopled woods and hills, these straines were sung.
And most of theirs they seeme to parallell,
Who boast to drinke of Aganippes well.
Despaire not, therefore, you that love the Muses,
If any Tyrant you or yours abuses;
For these will follow you and make you mirth,
Ev'n at the furthest angles of the earth,
And these contentments which at home ye leese,
They shall restore you among beasts and trees.

Yours,

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The following alludes to a singular custom formerly observed by the Lord Mayor of London, but which, I presume, is now omitted. Every Lord Mayor gave, in the course of his Mayoralty, "a gilded spoon to most of his Company, and at a solemne feast each guest gives him 4 or 51. or more towards his charge.”

EPIG. 22.

TO A PARDON BUYER.

The Pope gives thee a sweeping indulgence,
But thou must give him good store of thy pence:
So my Lord Mayor gives spoons all guilded oer,
Receives for each foure or five pounds therefore.

The City now makes a large allowance, as much, I believe, as 8000l. to each Lord Mayor, for the maintenance of his state and dignity,

EPIG. 35.

TO, SIR PIERCE PENNY-LESSE.

Though little coyne thy purse-lesse pocket lyne,
Yet with great company thou art ta'en up,
For often with Duke Humphrey thou dost dyne,
And often with Sir Thomas Gresham sup.

Note on the above.

“He walks out his dinner in Paules, and his supper in the Exchange."

The

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The aisles of St. Pauls Church were then the fashionable City walk.

EPIG. 46.

POPERIES PRINCIPAL ABSURDITIES.

Of all the hoodwinkt trickes in Popery,
This is the lamentablest foppery,
When God is made to speake and to command
Men in a tongue they doe not understand,
And men commanded are to sing and pray
To such fond things as know not what they say;
And these men having madly, sadly prayd,
Themselves doe not know what themselves have said.

Note on the above.

“ In Papisticall Churches they both read the Scripture, and sing and pray to images, in Lat

taine.”

One more specimen may suffice.

EPIG. 114.

TO MY HONEST BED-FELLOW, THE PRIVATLY

CHARITABLE DISCREETLY BENEFICIAL MASTER
EDWARD PAYNE, MERCHANT OF BRISTOLL.

Piein is Greeke to drinke, Pain French for bread,
With Paine God says with these we shall be fed,
Yet without Payne many these needfulls gaine,
Only by thanking God and Master Payne.

JOHN

JOHN' HEATH.

OF

THE following rare Tract will conclude my Selection of this kind :

Two CENTURIFS EPIGRAMMES, Written by John Heath, Bachelour of Arts, and Fellow of New Colledge, in Oxford.

London. Printed by John Windet. 1610."

These Epigrams are inscribed “ To the Vertuous Gentleman, M. Thomas Bilson, sole Sonne to thạt Reverend Father, the now L. Bishop of Winchester.'

The following complimentary lines to the Author deserve preservation:

Jocos, delitias, sales, lepores
Salsos, innocuos, graves, pudicos,
Vis libro pariter videre in uno?
Heathi centurias legas, legendo
Jocos, delitias, sales, lepores,
Salsos, innocuos, graves, pudicos,
In libro pariter videbis uno.

Casta placent ? castus liber iste. Jocosa ? jocosus,

Innocua ? invenies. Relligiosa ? dabit.
Oh quot habes ipsis Musis et Apolline digna !

Oh quam multiplices, parve libelle, sales !

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EPIG. 2.

IN LIBRUM SUUM.

My booke it must please all, or some, or none,
And one of these three it needs must embrace,
It cannot possible please every one;
And for to please none thats a maine disgrace.
Yet for my will, what ere of it become,
I rather would, it should please none than some.

EPIG. 5.

It must be questioned in philosophy,
Whether the sight thats resiant in the eye,
Be first by sendir.g out these radiant streames,
Or els by taking in reflexed beames.
Might I, with my poore skill, resolve the doubt;
I should determine 'twere by sending out.
So nimbly doe we others faults discrie,
So blinde we are when we looke inwardly.

T. DECKER,

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