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Gaelic.

Arabic, Persian,
Hebrew, orChaldaic.

English.

English.

}Skill

{ Ass

, ar.

Annsin
Adverb There Anja, Per.

There.
Aireac
Noble Arek, Ar.

A noble person.*
Aladh, pronounced
Ala

Alim, Ar. and Per. Wisdom. Am

A season, or Am, in Ar. & Per. A year.

spaceoftime Aun, in Per. Time. Amad

A fool.
Ammet, Ar.

A plebeian.
Ar

To plough
Arain, Ar.

To plough.
Abair, or Labhair

Speak Abair, Ar. Interpreting
Acras
Hunger Ajuz, Ar,

Hunger.
Aois

Ar.
Age
Eta, Chal.

Age.
Aosta

Aged
Enosh, Heb.

Aged man.
Astar
SA wander-

} Aster

, Heb.

A star. ing star Aile

Wind

Avel, Abel, H.&Syr. Wind.
Baile

A town
Baled, Ar.

A city,
Bas

Death
Fauz, Per.

Death.
Beul, from the root
Be, life, and Toll,

Bal, Ar. and Heb. Babler. an opening; but

Cavity, capathe t being quiesMouth

city, or the cent, it sounds Be

Bit, or Betih, Heb.

inside of any ol, or Beul, the

I thing.
opening of life.
Bean

A woman
Benaz, Ar.

A woman.
Biath pronounced Bia, Food

Bit, Ar. and Per. Food. Brathair pronounc

A brother ed Brair

Berith, Heb.

A brother.

* In the language of Otaheite the higher classes of the people are called Erree, and the king is called Errie no Rahie, signifying the King of the Nobility. See Cooke's Voyage.

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Buidhe
Buachair, or Buag-
haor, compounded

and Gaor dung

Cowodung

Achaath, Albucar, A. Cow-dung.

of Bo a cow,

Car

} Carron

, Chal.

Ceann

Corn
Caoileach(in Welsh
Ceiliog)

}

{

}

Cailleach

SA car, or 1
? chariot

A chariot.
Head

Khan, Ar. and Pers Head, or chief.
A horn Keren, Heb. A horn.

Gheles, Ar.
A cock

A cock.
Kelash, Pers.

Kehel, Ar.
Old woman

Kehle, Per.
Who
Ki, Per.

Who.
Achurchyard,

A circle, or circle, or place Cela, Heb.

place inclos inclosed

ed.

A poet, or Dana, Ar, and Per.

{Khel

, Ar.

Full of years.

Ci, or Co

Cill, or Ceill,

Dan

A poem

learned per

son.

Dec

Ten

s Deh, Per.
| Deka, Chal.

}

Ten.

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Math, or Ma

Good

Matach and Matah
Heb. and Chal.

the taste. Mother.

Mathair, pronounc ed Mair,

Mother

Mar, Syriac

Arabic, Persian,
English. Hebrew,or Chaldaic.

Gaelic.

English.

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А

Meisg

Drunkenness

S Mesck, Ar.

| Mesk, Per. Marc (ancient name,) A horse whence Marcshluagh Cavalry

Merc, Chal.

horse. Marcach

Marc, German

Riding Moladh

Praising Moalakat, Ar.& Per. In praise. Paisde

A child Pechè, Per. A child. Paisdan

Children Pechégan, Per. Children.t
Paishgeara

A midwife Peshkari, Per. A midwife.
Pog pose, or buse A kiss
Whence Pogadh

Puse, or buse, in
Kissing
Per.

|A Posadh

Marriage Rathad,orRad, from

A road, or

Rah, Per. Rath, a wheel, i

highway. and Aite, place; A road, or

A prince, or i. e. a place made highway

Rajah, Per.

chief of a diseasy for carriages

trict.

Rahee, Per. A traveller.
Ran, the ancient

Ranach, Heb.
A

A frog name for

Ranah, Egypt.
Sac
A sack Sac, Heb.

A sack.
Scian

A knife
Skian, Ar.

A knife.

to pass

}

* There is a poem in Arabic called Moalakat (i. e.) In Praise, written by Prince Amaralkeis, a cotemporary of Mahomet. It is in praise of a great action, and the following line has a great analogy to the Gaelic.

Fakalit yaminalahi ma lika hilatown," which signifies “ And she said, by the right hand of God, you shall not be deceived." There is a poem in Clark's Caledonian Bards called “ Oran Molla," a song of praise.

+ It deserves notice, that a certain class of nouns in the Gaelic, form their plurals by adding an to the singular number, and the same holds in the Persian by adding gan or an, as in the above example,

Arabic, Persian,
Hebrew,or Chaldaic.

Gaelic.

English

English.

over, &

Speur

Sky
Sipher, Per.

Sphere.
Sen, or sean Old

Sen, Heb.

Old.

The name for Sen-ar Old land Senar, Heb.

Noah's mount. Teine

Fire.

Tannur, Heb. Fire.
Beyond,

Top, or sumTar

Tar, Per.

mit of a above.

mountain.

Tauro, taur,Ch. Tarabh

A bull

Syriac, & Ar. A bull,
Tor, Heb.

To produce, or
Talah
The earth, soil Atla, Per.

bear.

A spirit, from Taibhse An apparition Tabish, Ar.

Tabi, a fol

lower. Taoiseach A chieftain Taasil, Ar.

Chiefs. Tigh, pronounced Ti, A house

Ti, Heb.

A house. Tog

To lift it up

Toger, in Malabar, To lift up.

We cannot conclude these desultory etymological researches, without noticing a Celtic proverb mentioned by Mr. Cambry of the Celtic Academy in France, * which from, its affinity with the Gaelic now spoken, is peculiarly striking, both as to the pronunciation and sense of the words. He says, “ that the people of Britanny have preserved the true etymology of Paris in a Celtic proverb, of which the style manifests its being of the most remote antiquity: namely,

Monumens Celtiques, p. 361.

,

A ba ouè beuzet ar ghar a Is,
Ne-d-eus ket kavet par da Baris.”

which, according to the Gaelic orthograpy, is thus :

A bha ou bàuisg ar caer a Is,
Ne'n deas caiť gheibt' par da Bharis.

and is thus translated into Latin and English:

Ex quo aqua inundavit civitatem Is
Haud apparet ubi inveniatur par Parisiis. .
Since the water has overflowed the city Is,
There does not appear an equal to Paris.

The city of Is, alluded to in the Celtic proverb, is celebrated in ancient geography, and which tradition places in the Bay of Douarnenez, in the southwest of Britany near Quimper, and is said to have been submerged. The Celtic word par, signifying equal, or like, renders, when joined to Is, what is called, in the French language, un jeu de mots, viz. Par-is, which means equal, or like Is, the name of the ancient city alluded to.

Thus we have endeavoured to demonstrate the analogy of the Greek, Latin, and Oriental languages to the Gaelic. From the proofs adduced, and examples given, whereof, were it necessary, many hundreds equally applicable might be added, we may safely venture to assert, that no language ancient or modern contains more primitive roots than the Celtic or Gaelic.

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