Travels in Upper and Lower Egypt, Volume 2

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Page 59 - And the mixed multitude that was among them fell a lusting: and the children of Israel also wept again, and said, "Who shall give us flesh to eat? We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick: But now our soul is dried away: there is nothing at all, beside this manna, before our eyes.
Page 103 - Camel, he throws down his garments in some place near which the animal is to pass, and disposes them in such a manner, that they appear to cover a man sleeping under them. The animal recognises the clothes, seizes them in his teeth, shakes them with violence, and tramples on them in a rage.
Page 102 - In eastern countries there is no mode of conveyance so cheap and expeditious as that by Camels. The merchants and other passengers unite in a caravan, to prevent the insults and robberies of the Arabs. These caravans are often very numerous, and are always composed of more Camels than men.
Page 102 - ... of high general utility, these valuable animals possess a great degree of instinct and intelligence. They are said, indeed, to be extremely sensible of injustice and ill-treatment. The Arabs assert, that, if a person strike them without cause, he will not find it easy to escape their vengeance ; and that they will retain the remembrance of it, till an opportunity offer for gratifying their revengeĽ having in this point a striking similarity of character with their masters.
Page 40 - ... his howlings were redoubled, his limbs writhed, his countenance assumed the features of madness, and his mouth extended by terrible grimaces, was all in a foam. Every now and then he devoured a fresh morsel of the reptile. Three men endeavored to hold him, but he dragged them all three round the chamber. His arms were thrown about with violence on all sides, and struck everything within their reach. Eager to avoid him, M. Forneti and I were obliged sometimes to cling to the wall, to let him pass...
Page 147 - ... Tired of being the spectator of a scene in which it was useless for me to take a part, I proceeded towards the monastery, hoping to find Hussein, who had repaired thither ; when I heard myself called, and presently felt myself seized by the arm. It was the chief of the robbers, an Arab of the desert of Nubia, for his face was as black as a negro's. He led me back, without saying a word, into the midst of the troop. I imagined that he was desirous of the garments they had left me, or that, on...
Page 103 - I have sometimes seen them," says M. Sonnini, " weary of the impatience of their riders, stop short, turn round their long neck to bite them, and utter cries of rage. In these circumstances the man must be careful not to alight, as he would infallibly be torn to pieces : he must also refrain from striking his beast, as that would but increase his fury. Nothing can be done but to have patience, and appease the animal by patting him with the hand, (which frequently requires some time), when he will...
Page 150 - ... that surrounded me, and expose myself to their vengeance. These banditti thought it not sufficient to appear just, they would also be polite. The chief brought me his horse, and insisted on my mounting it, to ride the little distance from the place we were to the monastery, while he attended me on foot. Some others of the Arabs paid the same respect to my companions, each of them walking, in like manner, by the side of his horse. When we came near the walls, we saw some baskets of bread, and...
Page 148 - Bedouins, partly through deference, the black chief consented to restore all that was taken from me ; and this was done with truly admirable fidelity. It is true, every thing that appeared valuable in the eyes of him who had taken it, required to be particularly claimed ; but when the chief insisted upon it, it was produced ; and this discipline among people, and in a place where we could not have expected to find an instance of it, appeared to me highly astonishing. The chief came to ask me what...
Page 102 - ... believe they have satisfied their vengeance. Accordingly, when an Arab has excited the rage of a Camel, he throws down his garments in some place near which the animal is to pass, and disposes them in such a manner, that they appear to cover a man sleeping under them. The...

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