The Emperor-Marcus Antonius: his conversation with himself. together with the preliminary discourse of the learned Gataker

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Page 33 - The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts, therefore guard accordingly ; and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue and reasonable nature.
Page 54 - ... reflections of Marcus Aurelius ! Philosopher as he was, he would have us learn from plants the lesson of cause and effect, the continuity of life. He says : The destruction of one thing is the making of another; and that which subsists at present is, as it were, the seed of succession, which springs from it. But if you take seed in the common notion, and confine it to the field or the garden, you have a dull fancy. It is with a sense of relief that we turn from the thoughts which a garden suggests...
Page 61 - ... about that I was made for, and for the sake of which I was sent into the world? Was I then designed for nothing but to doze and keep warm beneath the counterpane? Well! but this is a comfortable way of living. Granting that: were you born only for pleasure? were you never to do anything? Is not action the end of your being? Pray look upon the plants and birds, the ants, spiders, and bees, and you will see them all exerting their nature, and busy in their station. Pray, shall not a man act like...
Page 30 - ... and endeavours to do the first as it should be, and believes that his lot is good. For every man's fate is suitable, since it is suited to him. He considers that the rational principle is akin in all men, and that general kindness and concern for the whole world is no more than a piece of human nature — that not every one's good opinion is not worth the gaining, but only that of those who seek to live in accordance with Nature. As for others, he knows their way of living, both at home and abroad,...
Page 168 - O Philosophy, thou guide of life, and discoverer of virtue ! " — CICERO. " Philosophy is a modest profession, it is all reality and plain dealing ; I hate solemnity and pretence, with nothing but pride at the bottom." — PLINY. The destiny of man — of the most brutal, animal-like, as well as of the most saintly — being immortality, according to theological teaching ; what is the future destiny of the countless hosts of the animal kingdom? We are told by various Roman Catholic writers — Cardinal...
Page 125 - To make out this, it is not enough to say that he disputed better with the sophists, and died more bravely ; that he passed the night in the cold with more endurance, and that when he was bidden to arrest Leon of Salamis, he held it nobler to...
Page 176 - MY soul, are you ever to be rightly good, simple, and uniform, unmasked, and made more visible to yourself than the body that hangs about you ? Are you ever likely to relish good nature and general kindness as you ought ? Will you ever be fully satisfied...
Page 234 - I am convinced of the certainty of their existence ; in the first place, I answer, that the gods are not invisible. But granting they were, the objection would signify...
Page 19 - But, in truth, the being of the gods, and their concern in human affairs, is beyond dispute. And they have put it entirely in a man's power not to fall into any calamity properly so-called. And if other misfortunes had been really evils, they would have provided against them too, and furnished man with capacity to avoid them.

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