A Philosophical and Practical Treatise on the Will: Forming the Third Volume of a System of Mental Philosophy

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Harper & brothers, 1841 - Will - 411 pages
 

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Contents

CHAPTER IV
78
Remarks on the nature of the will
80
Of the nature of the acts of the will or volitions
81
Volition never exists without some object
82
It exists only in reference to what we believe to be in our power
83
Volition relates to our own action and to whatever else may be dependent upon us
84
Volitions involve a prospective element
87
Volitions may existwith various degrees of strength
88
Causes of the variation of the strength of the voluntary exercise
89
Further illustrations of the same subject
90
Of preference or indifference as applicable to the will
91
CHAPTER V
94
Probable cause of desires and volitions being confounded
95
The distinction of desires and volitions asserted by consciousness
96
Desires differ from volitions in fixedness and permanency
98
Further proof of this distinction from language
99
Sentiments of esteem and honour often imply this distinction
100
Of some strictures on the foregoing remarks of Reid
101
Volition may exist in respect to those complex acts which the mind can embrace as one
103
If the distinction in question do not exist the foundation of morals becomes unsettled
105
Instances in illustration of the distinction in question
107
Other instances in illustration of proof
108
Proofs drawn from some facts in the constitution of the mind
109
Of the chastisements of the Supreme Being inflicted on those he loves
111
Objected that these views lead to contradictions
113
Opinions of Mr Locke and others on this subject
115
PART II
117
CHAPTER I
119
Of the importance of the topics now entered upon
120
The inquiry whether the will has its laws preliminary to that of its freedom
122
Section Pj?e
123
CHAPTER II
130
Laws of the will inferred from the fact that in the administration
136
LAWS OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN THE PRESCIENCE OR FORESIGHT
142
Of the reasonableness of the foregoing views
148
Other familiar instances of this foresight
154
Section Pagi
163
Proof on the subject before us from instances of predominant
170
Of the universality of belief in the law of causality
176
Opinions of President Edwards on this subject
183
CHAPTER VII
190
Grounds or foundation of this belief
196
On the practical tendency of the general doctrine of law in its
202
Seclioo ttf 124 The character of motives depends in part on the constitutional traits of the individual
207
Their character depends in part on temporary influences
208
Further division of motives into Natural or Personal and Moral
209
Further statements illustrative of the distinction between natural and moral motives
210
Motives coextensive with volitions
212
Nature of the influence of motives
214
Of the wills being governed by the strongest motive
215
Of the elements of the contest within
218
PART III
221
CHAPTER I
223
Of unsuccessful attempts to explain the nature of freedom
224
Freedom considered as an element of thought rather than as a thing in actual realization is the name of a simple abstract idea
225
Remarks on great strength uf the will
226
Occasions of the origin of the abstract idea of liberty
227
Of the undefinableness of the term freedom
228
Energy of the will as shown in martyrdoms
229
Distinction between the idea and reality of liberty
230
Of the source of our knowledge of liberty itself in distinction from the abstract idea of liberty 231
231
Of the precise import of the phrase moral liberty
232
MENTAL HARMONY THE BASIS OR OCCASION OF MENTAL FREEDOM 141 Statement of the inquiry inthis chapter
233
Occasions on which liberty exists
235
Of the circumstances under which this mental harmony may be expected to exist
236
Opinions of Bishop Butler on conscience
237
Objected that perfect harmony of the mind is not realized in the present life
239
Perfection of mental harmony and consequent mental liberty
240
Objected that the foregoing views are necessarily and in their very terms inconsistent with liberty
242
Freedom of the will 148 Remarks on the nature of the freedom of the will
244
Of the relation of the freedom of the will to the fact of its subjec tion to law
245
Circumstances or occasions under which freedom of the will exists
247
Evidence of the freedom of the will from consciousness
249
Of an objection to the argument from consciousness
250
Illustration of the wills freedom drawn from the nature of motives
252
Remarks in continuation of this subject
253
Objected that the will is necessarily governed by the strongest motive i i
256
FREEDOM OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN MANS MORAL NATURE 8dion Pige 156 Remarks on the nature or mode of the argument
257
Of the elements of mans moral nature
258
Evidence of freedom of the will from feelings of approval and dis approval
259
The freedom of the will further shown from the attempts of men to influence the conduct of their fellowmen
271
Argued further from the view taken in the Scriptures
273
Practical importance of the doctrine of liberty
274
CHAPTER VI
277
Answered that they result necessarily from the evidence
278
Denial of the alleged contradiction
280
Admission of inexplicableness or mystery
281
Of the limited powers of the human mind
283
We find things which cannot be explained everywhere
284
Illustrated from the influence of one man over another
285
The opposite supposition attended with equal difficulty
286
Both views are to be fully received
287
CHAPTER VII
289
Inability to define enthralment or slavery
291
The nature of mental enthralment illustrated by a reference to extorted promises
292
Illustration of the same subject from cases of torture
293
Historical illustrations of the subject
295
The will enthralled by the indulgence of the appetites
297
Enthralment of the will occasioned by predominant and overru ling propensities
298
The will enthralled by inordinate ambition
300
The will enslaved by the indulgence of the passions
301
Inordinate intensity of the domestic affections
302
Of the slavery of the will in connexion with moral accountability
304
POWER OF THE WILL
307
CHAPTER I
309
Proof of the distinction between liberty and power
310
The distinction of power and liberty involved in the fact of our being able to form the abstract ideas of power and liberty
311
Distinction of power and liberty shown from language
312
Further shown from the fact of our possessing a moral nature
313
Origin of the idea of power in Original Suggestion
314
Occasions of the origin of the idea of power
315
The idea of power involves the reality of power
316
Things exist which are not made known by the senses
317
Of power as an attribute of the human mind
318
Further shown by a reference to the Divine Mind
320
CHAPTER II
322
Proof of power in the will from the analogy of the mind 322 204 The power of the will restricted and subordinate
323
Proof of power in the will from internal experience
324
Proved from the ability which we have to direct our attention to particular subjects
325
Proof of power in the will from observation
326
Of power of the will as exhibited in patience under suffering
328
Illustration of the subject from the command of temper
329
Further illustrations of this subject
330
Proved from the concealment of the passions on sudden and try ing occasions it 4
331
Further instances of concealment and repression of the passions
333
Illustrated from the prosecution of some general plan
334
The subject illustrated from the course of the first settlers of NewEngland
336
Illustrated by the fortitude exhibited by Savages
337
General remarks on a selfdetermining power
338
Of a selfdetermining power of the mind
339
Of the objective or outward sphere of Ihe minds activity
340
Of a selfdetermining power of the will
341
Of such a selfdetermining power of the will as involves the de pendence of the present volition on a former one
343
Opinions of President Edwards on this subject
344
CHAPTER IV
345
Differences in voluntary power seldom noticed 345 223 Remarks on constitutional weakness of the will
346
3A0
351
CHAPTER V
363
Illustrations of the inconsistent character
365
Illustrations of the consistent character
366
Of individuals remarkable for consistency of character
367
Of the value of consistency in the religious character
368
Of the foundation or basis of consistency and inconsistency of character
371
Of inconsistency of belief in connexion with inconsistency of conduct and character
372
Selfpossession an element of consistency of character
374
Consistency implies perseverance under changes of circumstances
375
Consistency implies a control over the passions
376
CHAPTER VI
378
A due balance of all the powers the most favourable state of things to the just exercise of the will
380
Of the culture of the appetites propensities and passions as aux iliary to the discipline of the will
382
Some instances and proofs of the foregoing statements
384
Importance of repressing the outward signs of the passions
387
Of enlightening the intellect in connexion with the discipline of the will
390
Further remarks on the same subject
392
Of aiding the will by a reference to the regard of others
394
Of aiding the will by a reference to the conscience
396
Of the aids furnished by the principle of imitation
397
Of aiding the will by placing ourselves in circumstances which do not admit of a retreat
399
Of the effects of habit in giving strength to the will
400
Of strengthening the will by religious considerations
401

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