A Philosophical and Practical Treatise on the Will: Forming the Third Volume of a System of Mental Philosophy

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Harper & brothers, 1841 - Will - 411 pages
 

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Contents

The intellectual part the foundation or basis of the action of the other parts of the mind
41
The connexion of the understanding with the will
42
The connexion of the understanding with the will shown from its connexion with action
43
Further proof from an observation of the conduct of men
45
Ilustration of the statements of the preceding section
46
Of the nature of the connexion between the understanding and will 17 Of the opinions of Mr Locke on this point
49
The acts of the intellect the direct antecedents to emotions
54
Emotions change with changes in the intellectual perceptions
55
The powers of the will not perfectly correspondent to those of the intellect
56
An energetic will sometimes found in connexion with limited powers of intellect
58
CHAPTER III
60
Of what are strictly included under the sensibilities
61
Emotions not in proximity with volitions
66
Emotions followed by desires and feelings of obligation
67
Obligatory feelings also in proximity with the will
68
Further remarks and illustrations on this subject
70
Opinions of metaphysical writers on the foregoing statements 33 Of the strength of the desires
72
Of the strength of feelings of obligation
75
Of the influence of the sensibilities on the understanding
76
CHAPTER IV
78
Remarks on the nature of the will
80
Of the nature of the acts of the will or volitions
81
Volition never exists without some object
82
It exists only in reference to what we believe to be in our power
83
Volition relates to our own action and to whatever else may be dependent upon
84
Nions involve a prospective element
87
Volitions may exist with various degrees of strength
88
Causes of the variation of the strength of the voluntary exercise
89
Further illustrations of the same subject
90
Of preference or indifference as applicable to the will WII OVOULONS
91
CHAPTER V
94
Probable cause of desires and volitions being confounded
95
The distinction of desires and volitions asserted by consciousness
96
Desires differ from volitions in fixedness and permanency
98
Further proof of this distinction from language
99
Sentiments of esteem and honour often imply this distinction
100
Other instances in illustration of proof
108
Proofs drawn from some facts in the constitution of t
109
Of the chastisements of the Supreme Being inflicted on those he loves
111
Objected that these views lead to contradictions
113
Opinions of Mr Locke and others on this subject
115
PART II
117
Of sagacity in the estimate of individual character
157
The doctrine of the wills subjection to law confirmed by con
163
Statement of other laws that are involved in the constitution
169
A belief in the law of causality founded in the peculiar structure
175
Opinions of President Edwards on this subject
183
CHAPTER VII
190
Grounds or foundation of this belief
196
120
202
122
204
Motives coextensive with volitions
212
Of the elements of the contest within
218
Or unsuccessful attempts to explain the nature of freedom
224
Distinction between the idea and reality of liberty i
230
Of the circumstances under which this mental harmony may
236
Objected that the foregoing views are necessarily and in their very
242
Evidence of the freedom of the will from consciousness
249
Objected that the will is necessarily governed by the strongest
256
FREEDOM OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN MANS MORAL NATURE
257
al character
260
Proof from feelings of moral obligation
263
Evidence of the freedom of the will from the control which every
269
CHAPTER VI
277
Of the limited powers of the human mind
283
Inability to define enthralment or slavery
291
The will enthralled by the indulgence of the appetites
297
Of the slavery of the will in connexion with moral accountability
304
NATURE OF MENTAL POWER
309
Occasions of the origin of the idea of power i
315
203
322
208
328
The subject illustrated from the course of the first settlers
336
Of such a selfdetermining power of the will as involves the
343
Of comparative or relative weakness of the will
347
Energy of the will as shown in imminent danger
353
Energy of the will requisite in the men of revolutions
359
Illustrations of the inconsistent character
365
Of the foundation or basis of consistency and inconsistency
371
CHAPTER VI
378
Some instances and proofs of the foregoing statements
384
Of enlightening the intellect in connexion with the discipline
390
Of aiding the will by a reference to the conscience
396

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