Scilly and Its Legends

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Page 136 - Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind, To war and arms I fly. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honour more.
Page 218 - The next day, after having been pillaged, and extremely sick and big with child, I was set on shore, almost dead, in the island of Scilly ; when we had got to our quarters near the castle, where the prince lay, I went immediately to bed, which was so vile, that my footman ever lay in a better, and we had but three in the whole house, which consisted of four rooms, or rather partitions, two low rooms, and two little lofts, with a ladder to go up : in one of these they kept...
Page 218 - ... consisted of four rooms, or rather partitions, two low rooms and two little lofts, with a ladder to go up : in one of these they kept dried fish, which was his trade, and in this my husband's two clerks lay, one there was for my sister, and one for myself, and one amongst the rest of the servants. But, when I waked in the morning, I was so cold I knew not what to do, but the daylight discovered that my bed was near swimming with the sea, which the owner told us afterwards it never did so but...
Page 218 - ... in one of these they kept dried fish, which was his trade, and in this my husband's two clerks lay, one there was for my sister, and one for myself, and one amongst the rest of the servants. But, when I waked in the morning, I was so cold I knew not what to do, but the daylight discovered that my bed was near swimming with the sea, which the owner told us afterwards it never did so but at spring tide.
Page 14 - It is true that Sir Kaye, the seneschal, remained true, and Sir Ector de Maris, and Sir Caradoc, and Sir Tristram, and Sir Lancelot of the Lake, of whom it was said that ' he was the kindest man that ever struck with sword ; and he was the goodliest person that ever rode among the throng of knights ; and he was the meekest man, and the gentlest, that did ever eat in hall among ladies ; and he was the sternest knight to his mortal foe that ever laid lance in rest.
Page 14 - And still these lovers' fame survives For faith so constant shown, — There were two who loved their neighbours
Page 212 - When any one is attainted of any felony, he ought to be taken to a certain rock in the sea, and with two barley loaves, and one pitcher of water upon the same rock, they leave the same felon, until, by the flowing of the sea, he is swallowed up...
Page 54 - twas ridiculous Not to suppose every one was a Saint. And how, in the Abbey, no one was so shabby As not to say yearly four masses a head, On the eve of that supper, and kick on the crupper Which Satan received, for the souls of the dead...
Page 45 - Pilgrim's breast, and bade him stand back. It was an evil chance that he did so. His hand had scarcely touched the Palmer's chest, ere the latter flung his cloak aside, raised his mailed arm, and smote the old man rudely upon the head. " Dog of a Priest, thou cowled robber," he cried, in a voice of thunder, " take that, as a memento of Richard Plantagenet.
Page 44 - On coming alongside the broad stones that formed a base to the stairs, they sprang ashore, and began to ascend. At their head was one apparently of higher rank, or of superior sanctity, for he walked alone. His face was partly buried in his large cloak, and partly concealed beneath his wide-brimmed hat, the deep flaps of which, hanging down, were often employed to hide the features.

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Celtic Culture: A-Celti

Limited preview - 2006

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