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event of such a character and many of the hearers will cry magnitude as has taken place out as if he had touched the to come upon the Churches apple of their eye or pricked except for some great purpose; them in the heart. and it would seem to be in In the General Assembly, a the line of a great purpose year or two ago, I took occathat the Churches should all sion to say that I hoped the be awakened to look not only time was not distant when on their own things, but on

all the Churches together the things of others also, and the nation-would go to Parto attempt something which liament for a great, patriotic, would raise the whole of them,

statesmanlike measure. and Christianity itself, in the of that mind more than ever esteem of all men, and would be now. But that will take to the glory of their Master. longer time to prepare than

Bodies generally, and, above the Churches dare continue in all, Churches, when they have their present relations. We long held some principle in a can, however, meantime with framework or setting of their very little delay have at least own, come to regard its very combination, and ought to have existence as bound up with it. I believe that opportunity that particular setting, and to and a loud call have been preimagine that, if the setting be sented to us, and that we all removed, the principle must go are face to face with a great with it. We must all get rid responsibility; and that if it is of this most obstructive mis- neglected we all must suffer, conception. The thought has and this along with the cause long hung about my mind,—I we ought to live for. expressed it from the chair in By combination I mean that 1897, Does our great Head which shall be as real and Himself attach to such things practical and one - aimed as as keep us apart and form the that which in the commercial subject of clamour and the world is called a "combine ” cause of anger - does He at -an active, forceful, conjoint tach to them the same im- propelling power in the King's portance as is attached to business, "hastened and pressed them by the Churches ? I do on by the King's commandnot believe it. If I could, I ment.” should have to reconsider, if I shall mention but not to discard, my views of specimen of what a real Godreligion-as so many from sim- fearing combination would do. ilar causes are driven by the Here is a country parish havChurches to do. It is pitiful ing a population of 425 and to find that when a speaker two fully equipped churches suggests that something pecu- within 300 yards of each other, liar to his own Church might and another of 779 inhabitants, be dropped, for the sake of with three churches within fifty something greater and better, yards of each other. There are

one

save

men

hundreds of such cases. Com- which most people now see bination would set to work to the matter. The recent disremove such flagrant exhi- aster might well be thought bitions of opposition or di- of as giving a lesson specially vision, and

and on this point.

And if commoney for work that is im- bination would accomplish the perative. The Churches would desired end with

with churches speak to their congregations, already in existence, much as before their Lord, of the more would it prevent the high spiritual motives by erection of new rival churches, which we must all be con- Divinity Halls, and the like. strained. We make no re- No language can express the flection those at whose sinking of heart with which instance churches were multi- good men regard the very plied. They did what they possibility of such erections. believed to be their duty in We but instance these things. their day. It is for us to Combination would do many learn and to do what is our and great things besides. Of duty at the present day. To course, even combination has have built those churches might its difficulties, as every enterbe praiseworthy, while to con- prise of any worth has, but tinue them all now may be none that may not be overunjustifiable and even come by capable and good men dalous. This is the light in and the powers that be.

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INDEX TO VOL. CLXXVI.

AND

OR

OF

219 et seq.

“ ABOLISUED, Is

REMAINS : Bears, shooting of, in Ladakh, 552 ct
PRIVATEER VERSL'S

VoluXTEER seq.
FLEETS, 478.

BENEFACTORS BLASPHEMERS ? A
Arld river, sea-trout of the, 237.

HIGHER CRITICISM INQUIRY, 536.
AFRICAN COLONY, THE, 75.

BEXTINCK, LORD GEORGE, 108.
'African Colony, the : Studies in the Bentinck, Lord George, parliamentary

Reconstruction,' by John Buchan, career of, 108, 11l et seq.-sway of,
review of, 75 et seq.

on the turf, 109—sells his racehorses,
Agricultural population, improved con 114–character of, 115.
dition of the, 10.

Bishop, Isabella (Isabella Bird), early
AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMME,

MR life of, 698—first journeys of, 699 et
CHAMBERLAIN'S, 417.

seq.-marriage of, 701-Persian jour-
AMBASSADOR OF THE REPUBLIC

ney of, ib. et seq. -London home of,
LETTERS, ax, 190.

704.
An Epistle, 297.

Bismarck, lengthy diplomatic relations
ARAN, FROM TORY TO: The Harvest between the Emperor Napoleon and,

of the Sea, 313–Tory and its People,
314—The Transport Problem, 319– Blake, William, as

a literary critic,
Drifting for Salmon, 321-A Failure 565.
of the Board's and its Causes, 322—

BoY IN

THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL.,
What has beon dono in Aran, 325. 501.
Arnold, Matthew, eminence of, as a Bor's HOME-TRAINING, 241.
literary critic, 567.

British Association, Mr Balfour's address
Asia, ON TIE OCTSKIRTS OF EMPIRE at the opening of the, 406 et seq.

Brownc, General Sir James, anecdotes
AT THE FLIGHT O'THE DUCK, 374. of, 601, 610, 612 et seq.
* Autobiography by Alexander Bain, BURIAL OF THE ATTA of IGARALAND,
LL.D., notice of, 97 et scq.

TIIE, AXD THE “ CORONATION
BACHELOR, IN DEFENCE OF THE, 117. HIS SOCCESSOR, 329.
Baghdad Railway, the projected, doubt CAMBILAN

SIIIBBOLETH ; OR,
fül value of, to Britain, 690 et seq.

NATURAL PAILOSOPHY AT HIGUBURY,
Bux, PROFESSOR, 95.

242.
Bain, Professor, early years of, 97– Camel, the, vagaries of, 530 et seq.-

university career of, 99—friendship homo of, 535.
of, with J. S. Mill, 100 — literary CAMELS, DAYS AND NIGHTS WITH, 530,
career of, 102, 105 — appointed to Camphor-forests of Formosa, the, 165
chair of Logic at Aberdeen, 101–
the text-books of, 105 - retirement Canadian country hotel, description of

of, 106.
Balfour, Mr, Address of, at the opening CATUAY, A CYCLE OF, 85.

of the British Association, 206 et CENTENARIES, Two, 255.
SI7

Chamberlain, Mr, speech of, on agri-
Bannu valley, subjugation of tho dwell. cultural reform, 417 et seq., 706–
or's in tho, 608 et seq.

his agricultural tariff, 420 et seq.,
BEACH, ON TUE, 381.

709,

IN, 688.

OF

UPON

et sco.

a, 63.

et seq.

CHILCOTE, JOHN, M.P., Chaps. XXIII. - Triumvirate, 410— The Seeker after

xxv., 7—XXVI., XXVII., 205—XXVIII. Truth : An Allegory, 412—A Visit to
XXX., 338—XXXI.-XXXiv. (Conclusion), Togo's Rendezvous, 414. IV., The
456—Note on, 578.

Path in the East is Strange, 717.
CHOICE OF A PUBLIC SCHOOL, ON THE, V., The Fall of the Mighty, 729–
756.

Champions, 734–The Outpost, 737.
CHURCHES AND THE LAW, 839.

EMPIRE, FREE-FOODERS AND THE, 705.
Claverhouse, Graham of, character of, EPISTLE, AN, 297.
453.

Eton, advantages of, as a Public School,
Colonial Conference, Mr Balfour's pro 764.
posal for a, 708 et seq.

Fishing-boats, rules of the British navy
Colonial produce, preferential duties on, for the protection of, 828 and note.
the importance of, 431.

FLEET, WITH THE, 175.
Colonies, relation of the, to Britain, 711, Formosa, description of, 159—inhabit-
715.

ants of, ib.—early settlers in, 160—
COLONY, TIE AFRICAX, 75.

cession of, by China to Japan, 161–
Confession of Faith, the, interpretation Japanese colonisation of, 162 et seq. -

of, by the Church of Scotland, 842 et material resources of, 164—the cam-
seq. - proposed joint action by the phor industry of, 165 et seq.—the
Churches regarding, 844 et seq.

tea trade of, 167_internal communi.
Correspondance do George Sand et cation of, 169—foreign trade of, 172–
d'Alfred de Musset,' notice of, 257 scarcity of labour in, 173.

FORMOSA, TIE JAPANESE IN, 159.
COUXTRY OF THE SOUTHDOWN HUNT, Fox-terrier, usefulness of the, in the

SPORT IN THE MIDDLE AGES, IN hunting-field, 671.
THE, 797.

Free Church case, judgment of the
Covenanters, rise and aims of the, 443 House of Lords in the, 433 et seq.

et seq.-persecution of the, 451 et seq. FREE-FOODERS AND THE EMPIRE, 705.
Coy, 364.

FROM TORY TO ARAN : The Harvest of
CRITICS AND CRITICISM, 559.

the Sea, 313–Tory and its People,
Cromwell, the Scottish campaign of, 314—The Transport Problem, 319–
449.

Drifting for Salmon, 321-A Failure
CYCLE OF CATIAY, A, 85.

of the Board's and its Causes, 322-
DAMASCUS : Its ENGLISII INFLUENCES What has been done in Aran, 325.

AND ITS SCOTTISH HOSPITAL, 775. Fyne, the river, sca-trout of, 238.
Damascus, present-day appearance of, Game, attitude of the farmer to, 37.

775—the Straight Street of, 777—the Harnack, Dr, on the divinity of Christ,
modern inhabitants of, 778—locality 540.
of St Paul's vision near, ib. the Harrow, contrast of, with Eton, as a

Victoria Hospital of, 779 et seq. Public School, 766.
DAYS AND NicatS WITII CAMELS, 530. HARTLEY, RICHARD,
Days, Two), 476.

Chaps. I., II., 579—111., IV., 739.
DEDUCTIONS, LIBERAL, 816.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel, early obscurity
Defaulting Authorities Bill, opposition of, 260-literary career of, 261.
to the, 291.

Hazlitt and Lamb, qualitics of, as liter-
DEMOS, TO, BY ANY ASPIRING RADI ary critics, 563 et seq.
('Al., 398.

Higier CRITICISM INQTIRY, A: BENE-
DESPERATE OpposiTION, A, 286.

FACTORS OR BLASPHEMERS? 536.
Dhuloch river, sca-trout of the, 237. Higher critics, the, teaching of, regardl-
Dogs, OVER, 263.

ing the divinity of Christ, 537 et seq.
Dorsetshire, fox-hunting eminence of, -attacks on the Pentateuch by, 543

673.
DREAM-FAIR, THE, 768.

Highland crofter, improved condition
DUCK, AT THE FLIGIT O'TIIE, 374. of the, 27.
Dutch, early contests of Britain with 'Histoire Littéraire du Peuple Anglais ?
the, for the sovereignty of the seas, by J. J. Jusserand, notice of, 491 et

seg.
Dwarr's TRAGEDY, TIIE, 358.

History of Criticism and Literary
EAST, THIE WAR IN THE: I., The Taste in Europe, from the Earliest

Blocking of Port Arthur, 129 — A Texts to the Present Day, a,' by
Glimpso at the Bayan, 131 — The Professor Saintsbury, vol. iii., notice
Race for l’ingyang, 134-River-Fight of, 559 et seq.
ing, 137 — The Sacrifice of O'Teru * History of English Literature,' M.
San, 139. II., The Forlorn-Hope at Taine's, the critics of, 490 et seq.
Kinchau, 281. III., The Military History of Scotland from the Roman

PROSPECTOR,

et seq.

822 et seq.

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214 et ser

565 et seq.

LAND, 621.

מן

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Invasion, a,' by Andrew Lang, vol. People,' M. Jusserand's, notice of,
iii., notice of, 442 et seq.

491 et seq.
• History of Twenty-five Years, the,' Literary reviewers, the, of the periodical

by Sir Spencer Walpole, notice of, press in the early nineteenth century,
HISTORY OF TWENTY-FIVE YEARS,' LORD GEORGE BENTINCE, 108.
WALPOLE'S, 214.

LORDS OF THE Marx, 819.
HOME-TRAINING, Boy's, 244.

MacGregor, Sir Charles, anecdotes of,
IIORSE-SUQE, ODE TO A, FOUND LYING 607.
IN THE ROAD, 677.

“ MADAM”: A LADY OF THE MOOR-
HOCYD AND TERRIER IN THE FIELD,
WITH, 671.

MAIX, LORDS OF THE, 819.
House of Lords, judgment of the, in the MANITOBA, A SPRING TRIP IN, 57.
Free Church Case, 433 et seq.

M Queen, Major-General Sir John, anec-
HOUSE WITII TIE TREE, TIE, 653. dote of, 599.
llowmore river, South Uist, sea-trout MEMORY AND A STUDY OF THE INDIAN
of the, 230 et 8cm.

MUTINY, A: I., Before the Émeute,
IGARALAND, THE BURIAL OF THE ATTA 184-II., The Emeute, and After, 195.

OF, AND TUE “CORONATION" OF HIS Montrose, Marquis of, character of the,
SOCCESSOR, 329.

415_campaigns of the, 446 et seq.
IN DEFENCE OF THE BACHELOR, 117. MR CIAMBERLAIN'S AGRICULTURAL
INDIAN MUTINY, A MEMORY AND A PROGRAMME, 417.

STUDY OF THE: I. Before the Émeute, MUSINOS WITHOUT METHOD :-

184-II. The Emeute, and After, 195. July: Lord Dundonald's Warning,
Indian Mutiny, causes of the, 186.

119 — The Military Position
ly GREAT WATERs, 1.

Canada, 121

- Algernon Charles
IX TIME of War, 614.

Swinburne, 123 - The Dawn of
Irish herring-fishery, improvement in Modern Literature, 126.
the, 313 et scq. passim.

August : The Degeneracy of the
“IS AND REMAINS ABOLISHED: PRIV Race, 271- What Education has

ATEER VERSUS VOLUNTEER FLEETS, done for us, 274–The Remedy pro-
478.

posed by the Doctors, 275 — The
ISABELLA BISHOP, SODE RECOLLECTIONS Death of Mr Kruger, 276 – His

Training in Warfare and Statecraft,
JAPANESE IN FORMOSA, THE, 159.

ib.-A Puppet of England's Enemies,
Joun CHILCOTE, M.P., Chaps. XXIII. 277—The English Language, 278-
XXV., 7-XXVI., XXVII., 203— XXVIII. The Debt

to Foreign
XXX., 338-XXXI.-XXXIV. (Conclusion), Tongues, ib.
436-Note on, 578.

September : The Chantrey Bequest,
Jusserand, M., Literary History of the 400—The Conduct of the Trustees,

English People' by, notice of, 491 et ib.—The Lords' Suggestions, 401–
8cq.

The Danger of Academies, 402—The
LADAKH, A SUBALTERN IN, 549.

Expedition to Thibet, 403 — The
Lamb, qualities of Hazlitt and, as litor Squalor and Magnificence of Lhasa,
ary critics, 563 et seq.

ib. — The Secret City of the Lamas,
Land, nationalism of tho, 26.

401–Our Policy in Thibet, 405—The
LANDLORDS, A PLEA FOR, 26.

Need of Energy, 406—Mr Balfour
LAW, CHURCHES AND TIIE, 839.

and the British Association, ib.
LEADING CASES, THE VROUW GROBE October : The Rise of Japan, 569–

LAAR'S : I., Unto the Third Genera Her Immemorial Seclusion, i6.-Will
tion, 145— The Dream-Faco, 149– Adams the Kentish Pilot, First
The Avenger of Blood, 154. II., The Englishman in Japan, 570 – The
Ilands of the Pitiful Woman, 303— Voyage of Captain Saris, ib. Trade
Piot Naude's Trek, 306-Like unto with the East India Company, ib. -
Liko, 310. III., Counting the Colours, Lord Elgin's Mission, 571-The At-
517-Tho King of the Baboons, 521. tack on the British Legation, ib. -
IV., Morder Drift, 660-A Good End, The Samurai at School, 572–Russia

666. V., Vasco's Sweetheart, 811. and Japan, 573–The Sensitiveness of
LETTERS, AN AMBASSADOR OF TIE RE the Press, 575–The Last of the IVar
l’UBLIC OF, 490.

Correspondent, ib. – Mr Tree and
LIBERAL DEDUCTIONS, 816.

“The Tempest,” 576.
Liberal Unionist Association, attack by November: London's Heavy Father,

the Opposition on the, 293 et seq. 679—The Ideal of Socialism, 680–
Licensing Bill, opposition to the, 288. The Modern Haroun-al-Raschid, 681
Litorary listory of tho English -London a City of the North, 683—

OF, 698.

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