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fear, and a little timid hope. And all THE LIGHT OF LOVE.

went on right the first evening. George (Continued from p. 363.)

was in high spirits and good humour; he CHAPTER IV.

had plenty to talk about, and Milly was a 3HE dreaded trial did good listener.

not await Milly on her But in the morning the flush of erreturn home. George citement passed; George came down to had gone to spend the breakfast somewhat cross and out of sorts; midsummer holidays his holidays were at an end, and the proswith a school friend, pect of school was not pleasant after his • so there was nothing late freedom and amusement.

to test the strength of “Where are the rest of my books?' he her resolve to follow out Mr. Maudsley's | asked of Milly, searching the book-shelves advice. It was a relief, certainly; and yet carelessly. I can't find above half. Where the child felt for a moment what most of are my Cæsar and Colenso? They ought us feel when, having strung ourselves up to be here.' for action or endurance, we suddenly find • I've never seen them,' Milly answered. that neither are required from us: she felt I don't think I know which they are.' a sense, not of disappointment exactly, You must have put them somewhere. but of half regret at her resolutions being You've been at home, and I've not; so of useless. The resolutions in such cases course it's you who have meddled with are apt to grow cold; but, left a good deal them.' to herself, little Milly dwelt much on the Miss Simpson only began to come yeshappy Past, and scarcely a day went by terday, and I never touched the lessonthat she did not think of the teachings she books in the holidays. But see, is this one?' had received at Deanthorne, and pray that asked Milly, anxious to be of use. she might be guided right when the time That a Cæsar ? You goose! Very of temptation came.

much like it, to be sure!' said George. Often as the afternoon sun stole in at • But girls are such idiots !' the nursery window, gilding the dingy Milly kept silence, bending over her wall-paper with its golden rays, she would geography. bring her ball and try and keep it in the 'I think you might help me to look, broad belt of light; while she mused in cried George, pulling down the volumes her dreamy childish fashion on what Mr. from one of the shelves, and leaving them Maudsley had said about the light of love. in disorder all about him. “But you are

• My life with George has been like such a selfish thing! Sitting there learnthe dingy walk on a dull day. If I were ing your own lessons, which don't matter quite good, and loved George as I ought a pin, and leaving me to get into trouble!' to do, it would grow perhaps as bright Milly jumped up at once and began to as this patch where the sun is shining, and help in the search; but her want of immethen it would really be something like diate success only provoked George the Heaven.'

further, and he pushed her away iinAt last the day came for George to re- patiently, throwing down at the same time turn home, and Milly's heart fluttered with a pile of books belonging to her.

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Oh, mind George!' she cried, seeing and she felt more bitter than before. So one of her favourite books fluttering to when George came home at dinner-time, the ground. You might take care. Oh, improved in temper and disposed to be you have broken the back !' and she picked friends, she drew back silently; she could up the spoiled book with an angry flush not forgive him thus easily without a word on her face.

of apology on his side. He called her a “What! in a tantrum, miss?' said George sullen thing, which did not mend matters, mockingly. “It serves you quite right; and he went off to amuse himself. it's your fault I can't find my things. I'll Milly meanwhile tried to comfort herself throw down the rest of your rubbish, and by playing with Amy. But it was of no hope all the backs may be broken ;' and use; she was not satisfied with herself, the naughty boy threw two or three of and she felt God could not be pleased Milly's treasures across the room, with a either. At last she could bear it no longer, taunting, There, there, there!' Then he and going up to her own bedroom, she caught up such of his books as he had knelt down by the side of the bed and collected, and dashed out of the room. cried piteously to her Father in Heaven, It was too much. Habit as well as • Help me, help me!

Don't let me be principle had restrained Milly from any wicked and hate George; don't let me passionate reply; but when George had be shut out in the darkness.' gone she sat down on the ground and burst A glimmering of light broke throngh into a storm of weeping.

the clouds; half the resentful feelings had How can I help hating him?' she sobbed. somehow passed away when Milly rose from · How can I love any one So cruel and her knees. unjust ? It really was not my fault this • Now I am to set about something,' she time; I did all I could. No, it is of no told herself. Mr. Maudsley would say I use. I cannot help being provoked; I can- must not think of George and the books not belp hating him.' The angry feelings stirged through her So she made all ready for Miss Simpson,

All that George had said and worked hard at her lessons during the and done kept repeating itself in her fancy, afternoon, getting more than her usual till anger dried up the source of her tears. number of good marks, and a kiss and No, it was no good to think of Mr. Mauds- kind word of approval from her goverley; he did not know what she had to ness. And she got also what was better still bear, or how bad George was. But Miss -a light heart. By the time that George Simpson would be here directly, and the came back from school, she could meet room in such disorder! So Milly began him without any return of anger. He had to set things straight, feeling all the time, behaved badly, it was true; but there "What business had George to make sich might be excuses for him.

. At any rate it a mess ?'-and she had scarcely finished did not do to dwell upon her injuries ; she when her governess appeared. The les- must try to forget, if she could not prevent sonş went on badly; Milly's lieart was too them. Better bear them ten times over, as sore to let her work well, and she lost her Mr. Maudsley had said, than live for ever ticket for the morning.

out of God's light. All George's fault,' she said to herself, This was Milly's first victory, only won

any more.'

poor little soul.

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