A Philosophical and Practical Treatise on the Will: Forming the Third Volume of a System of Mental Philosophy

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Harper & bros., 1843 - Will - 411 pages
 

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Contents

CHAPTER II
40
The intellectual part the foundation or basis of the action of the other parts of the mind
41
The connexion of the understanding with the will
43
Further proof from an observation of the conduct of men
45
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
46
Of the nature of the connexion between the understanding and will
48
Of the opinions of Mr Locke on this point
49
Opinions of Sir James Mackintosh on the same subject
51
The understanding reaches the will through the sensibilities
53
The acts of the intellect the direct antecedents to emotions
54
Emotions change with changes in the intellectual perceptions
55
The powers of the will not perfectly correspondent to those of
56
intellect
58
CHAPTER III
60
Of what are strictly included under the sensibilities
61
2G Acts of the intellect in immediate proximity with emotions
64
Emotions not in proximity with volitions
66
Emotions followed by desires and feelings of obligation
67
Obligatory feelings also in proximity with the will
68
Further remarks and illustrations on this subject
70
Opinions of metaphysical writers on the foregoing statements
71
Of the strength of the desires
72
Of the strength of feelings of obligation
75
Of the influence of the sensibilities on the understanding
76
CHAPTER IV
78
Remarks on the nature of the will 1
80
Of the nature of the acts of the will or volitions
81
Volition never exists without some object
82
It exists only in reference to what we believe to be in our power
83
Volition relates to our own action and to whatever else may be dependent upon us
84
Volitions involve a prospective element
87
Volitions may exist with various degrees of strength
88
Causes of the variation of the strength of the voluntary exercise
89
Further illustrations of the same subject
90
Of preference or indifference as applicable to the will
91
CHAPTER V
94
Probable cause of desires and volitions being confounded
95
The distinction of desires and volitions asserted by consciousness
96
Desires differ from volitions in fixedness and permanency
98
Further proof of this distinction from language
99
Sentiments of esteem and honour often imply this distinction
100
Of some strictures on the foregoing remarks of Reid
101
Volition may exist in respect to those complex acts which the mind can embrace as one
103
If the distinction in question do not exist the foundation of morals becomes unsettled
105
Instances in illustration of the distinction in question
107
Other instances in illustration of proof
108
Proofs drawn from some facts in the constitution of the mind
109
Of the chastisements of the Supreme Being inflicted on those he loves
111
Objected that these views lead to contradictions
113
Opinions of Mr Locke and others on this subject
115
PART II
117
CHAPTER I
119
Of the importance of the topics now entered upon
120
The inquiry vdether the will has its laws preliminary to that of its freedom
122
Section Fife
123
CHAPTER
130
Laws of the will inferred from the fact that in the administration
136
LAWS Or THE WILL IMPLIED IN THE PRESCIENCE OR FORESIGHT
142
Of the reasonableness of the foregoing views
148
Other familiar instances of this foresight
154
LAWS OF THE WILL INVOLVED IN ITS OWN NATURE Section Pap 94 The doctrine of the wills subjection to law confirmed by con sciousness
163
The same confirmed by the fact of the wills not being a subject but an attribute
164
The same confirmed by the fact that every exercise of the will implies an object
165
Confirmed also by the fact that every exercise of the will implies a motive
166
belief
168
Statement of other laws that are involved in the constitution or nature of the will itself
169
Proof on the subject before us from instances of predominant emotion and passion
170
Of the sense in which the proposition under consideration is to be understood
172
CHAPTER VI
174
A belief in the law of causality founded in the peculiar structure 175 176 178 179 180 183 184 187 188 of the human mind
175
Of the universality of belief in the law of causality
176
Of the classification into Preparative and Effective causes
178
Nature of Preparative and Effective causes
179
Opinions of various philosophers on this subject
180
Opinions of President Edwards on this subject
183
Results of a denial of the law of causality
184
Application of the views of this chapter to the will
187
Of the common and practical application of these views
188
Belief of men in the continued uniformity of natures operations
190
This belief exists in reference to mind as well as matter
192
Circumstances under which this belief arises
193
Of the true idea of chance in distinction from uniformity
194
Grounds or foundation of this belief
196
Reference to the opinions of Reid and Abercrombie
197
Application of these views to the will
199
Application of these views to sciences having relation to human conduct
200
On the practical tendency of the general doctrine of law in its ap plication to the will
202
CHAPTER VIII
203
Of the division of motives into Internal and External
204
External motives derive their efficacy from the mind
205
Section Ffcgs 124 The character of motives depends in part on the constitutional traits of the individual
207
Their character depends in part on temporary influences
208
Of unsuccessful attempts to explain the nature of freedom
224
Freedom considered as an element of thought rather than as a thing in actual realization is the name of a simple abstract idea
225
Occasions of the origin of the abstract idea of liberty
227
Of the undefinableness of the term freedom
228
Distinction between the idea and reality of liberty
230
Of the source of our knowledge of liberty itself in distinction from the abstract idea of liberty
231
Of the precise import of the phrase moral liberty
232
CHAPTER H MENTAL HARMONY THE BASIS OR OCCASION OF MENTAL FREEDOM 141 Statement of the inquiry in this chapter
233
Occasions on which liberty exists
235
Of the circumstances under which this mental harmony may be expected to exist
236
Opinions of Bishop Butler on conscience
237
Objected that perfect harmony of the mind is not realized in the present life
239
Perfection of mental harmony and consequent mental liberty
240
Objected that the foregoing views are necessarily and in their very terms inconsistent with liberty
242
CHAPTER III
244
Of the relation of the freedom of the will to the fact of its subjec tion to law
245
Circumstances or occasions under which freedom of the will exists
247
Evidence of the freedom of the will from consciousness
249
Of an objection to the argument from consciousness
250
Illustration of the wills freedom drawn from the nature of motives
252
Foresight of the conduct of masses of men and nations
253
Objected that the will is necessarily governed by the strongest motive 256 1
256
FREEDOM OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN MANS MORAL NATURE MOW 156 Remarks on the nature or mode of the argument
257
Of the elements of mans moral nature
258
Evidence of freedom of the will from feelings of approval and dis approval
259
159
260
Without the possession of liberty of will man could never have framed the abstract notions of right and wrong
261
Proof from feelings of moral obligation
263
Evidence from mens views of crimes and punishments
264
CHAPTER V
267
Evidence from the occasional suspension of the wills acts
268
The freedom of the will further shown from the attempts of men to influence the conduct of their fellowmen 168 Further evidence from the observa...
271
Argued further from the view taken in the Scriptures 5
273
Practical importance of the doctrine of liberty 5
274
CHAPTER VI
277
Answered that they result necessarily from the evidence 2
278
Denial of the alleged contradiction 2
280
Admission of inexplicableness or mystery 2
281
Of the limited powers of the human mind 2
283
We find things which cannot be explained everywhere 2
284
Illustrated from the influence of one man over another 2
285
The opposite supposition attended with equal difficulty 2
286
Both views are to be fully received 2
287
CHAPTER VII
289
Inability to define enthralment or slavery 29
291
The nature of mental enthralment illustrated by a reference to extorted promises 29
292
Illustration of the same subject from cases of torture 29
293
Historical illustrations of the subject 29
295
The will enthralled by the indulgence of the appetites 29
297
The will enthralled by inordinate ambition 30
301
Inordinate intensity of the domestic affections 30
302
Of the slavery of the will in connexion with moral accountability 30
304
Of the distinction between liberty and power
309
Occasions of the origin of the idea of power
315
CHAPTER II
322
Of power of the will as exhibited in patience under suffering
328
Illustrated from the prosecution of some general plan
334
Of the objective or outward sphere of the minds activity
340
Remarks on constitutional weakness of the will
346
Section Face 224 Of comparative or relative weakness of the will
347
Instances of want of energy of the will
348
Remarks on great strength of the will
350
Energy of the will as displayed under bodily suffering
351
Energy of the will as shown in imminent danger
353
Energy of the will as shown in martyrdoms
354
Subject illustrated from two classes of public speakers
356
Power of the will requisite in the military and other arts
358
Energy of the will requisite in the men of revolutions
359
Practical application of these views
362
CHAPTER V
363
Illustrations of the inconsistent character
365
Illustrations of the consistent character
366
Of individuals remarkable for consistency of character
367
Of the value of consistency in the religious character
368
Of the foundation or basis of consistency and inconsistency of character
371
Of inconsistency of belief in connexion with inconsistency of conduct and character
372
Selfpossession an element of consistency of character
374
Consistency implies perseverance under changes of circumstances
375
Consistency implies a control over the passions
376
CHAPTER VI
378
A due balance of all the powers the most favourable state of things to the just exercise of the will
380
Of the culture of the appetites propensities and passions as aux iliary to the discipline of the will
382
Some instances and proofs of the foregoing statements
384
Importance of repressing the outward signs of the passions
387
Of enlightening the intellect in connexion with the discipline of the will
390
Further remarks on the same subject
392
Of aiding the will by a reference to the regard of others
394
Of aiding the will by a reference to the conscience
396
Of the aids furnished by the principle of imitation
397
Of aiding the will by placing ourselves in circumstances which do not admit of a retreat
399
Of the effects of habit in giving strength to the will
400
Of strengthening the will by religious considerations
401

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Page 405 - The condition of man, after the fall of Adam, is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God : wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 125 - ... her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power; both angels and men and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 143 - LORD, thou hast searched me, and known me. Thou knowest my downsitting and mine uprising, thou understandest my thought afar off. Thou compassest my path and my lying down, and art acquainted with all my ways.
Page 189 - Would you know the sentiments, inclinations, and course of life of the Greeks and Romans ? Study well the temper and actions of the French and English.
Page 125 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 145 - Remember the former things of old: For I am God, and there is none else; I am God, and there is none like me, Declaring the end from the beginning, And from ancient times the things that are not yet done, Saying, My counsel shall stand, And I will do all my pleasure...
Page 369 - If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering: for he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea, driven with the wind, and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord.
Page 144 - Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight : but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.
Page 349 - A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts and nothing long; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 277 - For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.

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