Dick Turpin

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T. White, 1840 - English fiction - 323 pages
 

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Page 111 - I'll example you with thievery: The sun's a thief, and with his great attraction Robs the vast sea: the moon's an arrant thief, And her pale fire she snatches from the sun: The sea's a thief, whose liquid surge resolves The moon into salt tears: the earth's a thief, That feeds and breeds by a composture stolen From general excrement: each thing's a thief; The laws, your curb and whip, in their rough power Have uncheck'd theft.
Page 221 - ... of Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice, the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage : the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power; both angels and men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 186 - ... for a Lip, nor a languishing Eye: She's fickle and false, and there we agree; For I am as false, and as fickle as she: We neither believe what either can say; And, neither believing, we neither betray. Tis civil to swear, and say things of course; We mean not the taking for better for worse. When present, we love; when absent, agree: I think not of Iris, nor Iris of me: The Legend of Love no Couple can find So easie to part, or so equally join'd.
Page 215 - Of prowess and conduct adequate To what our place and fame doth promise, And all the godly expect from us, Nor shall they be deceiv'd, unless We're slurr'd and outed by success; Success, the mark no mortal wit, Or surest hand can always hit...
Page 10 - But yet be careful : Detraction's a bold monster, and fears not To wound the fame of princes, if it find But any blemish in their lives to work on. But I'll be plainer with you : had the people Been...
Page 1 - Why did she love him? Curious fool! — be still — Is human love the growth of human will?
Page 120 - Upon his brow The damps of death are settling, — and his eyes Grow fixed and meaningless. She marks the change With desperate earnestness; and staying even Her breath, that nothing may disturb the hush, Lays her wan cheek still closer to his heart, And listens, as its varying pulses move, — Haply to catch a sound betokening life. It beats — again — another — and another, — And, now, hath ceased for ever...
Page 220 - Because except our own private and but probable resolutions be by the law of public determinations overruled, we take away all possibility of sociable life in the world.
Page 269 - ... power. At last he faltered on his path; I goaded, but the goad was vain. Where was I ? with the sun's full wrath Around me on the desert plain. "What an unthought-of goal I'd won! Mercy! what wildering race I'd run! 'Twould soon be o'er; my failing horse Was strangely...
Page 190 - The hot thirsty sun then would drive with more haste, Secure in the evening of such a repast; And when he'd got tipsy would have taken his nap With double the pleasure in Thetis 's lap.

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