Logic; Or, the Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth: With a Variety of Rules to Guard Against Error, in the Affairs of Religion and Human Life, as Well as in the Sciences

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T. Tegg, 1811 - Conduct of life - 284 pages
 

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missing pgs 166 and 167

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Page 23 - First, our Senses, conversant about particular sensible objects, do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them. And thus we come by those IDEAS we have of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Page 190 - Search for evidence of truth with diligence and honesty, and be heartily ready to receive evidence, whether for the agreement or disagreement of ideas. Search with diligence. Spare no labour in searching for the truth, in due proportion to the importance of the proposition. Read the best authors who have writ on that subject : consult your wise and learned friends...
Page 58 - ... impertinent chattering, or useless trifles : visit other cities and countries when you have seen your own, under the care of one who can teach you to profit by travelling, and to make wise observations ; indulge a just curiosity in seeing the wonders of art and nature ; search into...
Page 255 - ... with obscurity and confusion : then we shall, as it were, naturally and with ease restrain our minds from rash judgment, before we attain just evidence of the proposition which is offered to us : and we shall with the same ease, and, as it were, naturally seize and embrace every truth that is proposed with just evidence. "This habit of conceiving clearly, of judging justly, and of reasoning well, is not to be attained merely by the happiness of constitution, the brightness of genius, the best...
Page 254 - ... advantages : and if there were nothing valuable in them for the uses of human life, yet the very speculative parts of this sort of learning are well worth our study ; for by perpetual examples they teach us to conceive with clearness, to connect our ideas...
Page 251 - ... and proves nothing. But where such gross equivocations and ambiguities appear in arguments, there is little danger of imposing upon ourselves or others. The greatest danger, and which we are perpetually exposed to in reasoning, is, where the two senses or significations of one term are near akin, and not plainly distinguished, and yet they are really sufficiently different in their sense to lead us into great mistakes, if we are not watchful. And indeed the greatest part of controversies in the...
Page 10 - Secondly, the ideas of substances are such combinations of simple ideas as are taken to represent distinct particular things subsisting by themselves, in which the supposed or confused idea of substance, such as it is, is always the first and chief.
Page 221 - A and B are unequal: if it agree with neither of them, there can be no comparison. So if the question be whether God must be worshipped, we seek a third idea, suppose the idea of a Creator, and say, Our Creator must be worshipped; God is our Creator; Therefore God must be worshipped...
Page 60 - To shorten something of this labour, if the books which you read are your own, mark with a pen or pencil the most considerable things in them which you desire to remember. Thus you may read that book the second time over with half the trouble, by your eye running over the paragraphs which your pencil has fioted.
Page 219 - By looking back into History, and considering the Fate and Revolutions of Government, you will be able to form a Guess, and almost prophesy upon the future; for things past, present, and to come are strangely uniform and of a Colour, and are commonly cast in the same Mould. So that upon the Matter, forty Years of Human Life may serve for a Sample of ten thousand.

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