The Book of Life: Mind and Body

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Macmillan, 1921 - Health - 202 pages

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Contents

II
3
III
8
IV
12
V
17
VI
21
VII
27
VIII
31
IX
37
XVII
91
XVIII
98
XIX
103
XX
105
XXI
115
XXII
123
XXIII
134
XXIV
145

X
42
XI
50
XII
53
XIII
61
XIV
67
XV
74
XVI
81
XXV
156
XXVI
163
XXVII
169
XXVIII
177
XXIX
182
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Page 196 - HOW happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill ! Whose passions not his masters are; Whose soul is still prepared for death, Untied unto the world by care Of public fame or private breath...
Page 197 - Nor ruin make accusers great; Who God doth late and early pray More of His grace than gifts to lend; And entertains the harmless day With a well-chosen book or friend; — This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall; Lord of himself, though not of lands; And have nothing, yet hath all.
Page 197 - Whose state can neither flatterers feed, Nor ruin make oppressors great ; Who God doth late and early pray, More of his grace than gifts to lend, And entertains the harmless day, With a religious book or friend.
Page 39 - The Puritan hated bearbaiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators.
Page 44 - It is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make Man better be ; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere : A lily of a day Is fairer far in May, Although it fall and die that night — It was the plant and flower of Light. In small proportions we just beauties see ; And in short measures life may perfect be.
Page 174 - I would not like to guess just what percentage of dying people in our hospitals might be saved if the doctors would withdraw all food from them...
Page 21 - ... reactionary (according as he placed his good either in the future or the past), or, thirdly, pessimistic, as in the poetry of regret or of despair. Hesiod sings of a lost golden age, and in this he represents the most pervading sentiment of ancient culture. Dante, on the other hand, had fixed his gaze on ' one far off divine event, towards which the whole Creation moves.
Page 41 - I say to you that if you want to find happiness in this life, look with distrust upon all absolutes, and ultimates, all hard and fast rules, all formulas and dogmas and "general principles." Bear in mind that there are many factors in every case, there are many complications in every human being, there are many sides to every question. Try to keep an open mind and an even temper. Try to take an interest in learning something new every day, and in trying some new experiment. This is the scientific...
Page 41 - ... general principles." Bear in mind that there are many factors in every case, there are many complications in every human being, there are many sides to every question. Try to keep an open mind and an even temper. Try to take an interest in learning something new every day, and in trying some new experiment. This is the scientific attitude toward life; this is the way of growth and of true success. It is inconvenient, because it involves working your brains, and most people have not been taught...
Page 173 - I have known of two or three cases of people dying while they were fasting," Sinclair writes in his Book of Life, "but I feel quite certain that the fast did not cause their death, they would have died anyhow.

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