The Argonautics, tr. into Engl. verse with notes by W. Preston, Volume 1

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Page 50 - ... heav'nly mind Might yield to calm the wave and chain the wind, With lips devout and suppliant action prays, And pours libations o'er the sacred blaze. Orpheus commands, the youths in arms advance, And tread the measures of the warlike dance ; With swords they clash their shields, and all around Through the vex'd air the dismal clangors sound. That ancient custom still the nations keep, When kings are borne within the tomb to sleep. In Rhea's worship still the Phrygian crowd, The goddess soothe...
Page 233 - There shifting sands the lab'ring bark embay ; Thence never crew pursued the homeward way. A hideous tract the slimy marshes spread : The putrid waves are motionless and dead : A treacherous depth of seeming land is seen, Devouring water, cloth'd in fraudful greon. Along the brine a spume corrupted lies, And pestilential vapors load the skies. . . Inhospitably rise the sandy heaps. No bird has dwelling there, no thing that creeps.
Page 147 - ... ceased to mourn Her darling infants closed within their urn. The busy hum of crowded streets was still ; And still the watchdog's larum loud and shrill. The queen of darkness trod her awful round, Her ears untroubled by a vagrant sound. Medea's couch refused the soft control, For love and Jason agonized her soul. The bulls that breathe intolerable fire, Forebodings mortal to her love inspire ; The plain of Mars in dismal prospect lies, In fancy there the youthful hero dies. Distracting thought...
Page 143 - Her tears fall lonely on the' enamour'd breast; When fates relentless the dear youth remove; Untried the joys, the tender thefts of love; From every tongue, that might impart relief, She dreads a censure on her amorous grief; In avarice of anguish hoards her care, And eyes the widow'd couch in mute despair; Thus mourn'd Medea; thus the cause suppress'd, That bathed her eyes and heaved her throbbing breast. ***** Now Night o'er earth her ample veil display'd; And sailors, from the deep, the stars...
Page 189 - Egypt, it was impossible not to be struck with its unique position in the religious history of the world. From the earliest times, down through that long series of ages in which a divine revelation was being given to the world through the...
Page xxviii - The Loves of Medea and Jason," a poem, in three books, translated from the Greek of Apollonius Rhodius Argonauticus.
Page xxxiv - ... volume, or to a separate volume. This practice is now so generally established, that it would appear an ungracious affectation of singularity, were I to contend for a disposition generally exploded. With the exception of a very few short ones, I have, therefore, consigned the notes to a separate station, according to the received form of book-making. Such is the outline of the present work. A consideration which disposed the author to employ himself in the present translation may also induce...
Page 49 - The stock uprooted from its parent soil A shape and polish takes from Argus' toil; An image of the goddess, form'd with skill, They place it high upon a craggy hill, O'erarching broad where stately beeches grow, That deeply shoot their twisted roots below. Stones rudely heap'd an hasty altar made ; With dusky leaves of oak...
Page xxix - Fabr. Thesau. a Harl.) Such are the marks of attention which Apollonius has hitherto received from the literary world. I shall not presume to say, how the English translators of Apollonius, who have gone before me, have succeeded in their task. It would ill become me to speak in degrading terms of those gentlemen, whose taste led them to precede me, in the meritorious province of endeavouring to do justice to this delightful and too much neglected writer. Their performances are before the public,...
Page xli - ... vi suscitat, ruit prolapsa, pelagus respergit reflat ; ita dum interruptum credas nimbum volvier, dum quod sublime ventis expulsum rapi saxum aut procellis, vel globosos turbines existere ictos undis concursantibus, nisi quas...

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