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IN LONDON, BY H. HUGHES, St. MARTIN's-Le-GRAND; AND T. Hookham,
15, old Bond street: IN chester (FoR North wales) by Poole
AND BOULT: AND IN CARMARTHEN (FoR south WALEs) by william
EVANS, SEREN GOMER OFFICE: AND TO BE HAD OF ALL OTHER BOOK-
SELLERS IN TOWN AND COUNTRY.

Price 12s. 6d. in boards.

1830.

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= , - G 3. TO THE
− RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD KENYON.
MY LORD,

The ready affability with which you granted us permission to dedicate this our Second Volume to you, is surpassed only by the unaffected kindness with which you seek to depreciate the obligation you confer: you have been pleased to suggest, that there are other noble and honourable persons more powerfully identified with the Welsh soil, and the Welsh people, and whose zeal for the cause of our national literature must consequently have been more ardent than your Lordship's. Permit us to observe, that such a supposition is far more consistent with the impulses of a generous mind, than with facts, or our experience; and, in so saying, we by no means adequately convey that high encomium which your Lordship's uniform solicitude for the welfare of our native land deserves.

It is impossible for us to recollect the early and earnest support that you afforded to our enterprise, without feelings at once of gratitude for your condescension, and of fervent esteem for the real goodness of your heart. Your aid was originally extended to us when we had every difficulty to contend with, and when many of those who most warmly wished us success regarded our attempt as a chimera; it was at this time that you stepped forward to encourage us, although our only claim to that encouragement was anxiety for the good fame of our country. To a patriotic mind, to a mind like your Lordship's, we know full well that it will be an ample compensation for all our deficiencies, if we have in one single instance been the means of vindicating the honour of our common country; nay more, we doubt not, that if we have been uniformly unsuccessful, the cause itself which we have espoused will ensure us the sympathy, and the considerate silence, though it may not gain us the applause, of every man who merits the name of Welshman. Yet, we trust that we have not been remiss in labouring to render our pages worthy of the attention of him to whose favor they owe so much ; to every suggestion that we could derive, either from the press or friendly communications, we have paid the utmost attention. Among the latter, we feel peculiarly gratified in recalling to mind the encouraging letters of two distinguished men entirely unconnected with our country, Mr. Moore and Mr. Granville

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