George Selwyn and His Contemporaries: With Memoirs and Notes, Volume 3

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"George Augustus Selwyn (11 August 1719?25 January 1791, age 71) was a Member of Parliament (MP) in the Parliament of Great Britain. Selwyn spent 44 years in the House of Commons without being recorded as making a speech. He put his electoral interest, as the person who controlled both seats in Ludgershall and one in Gloucester, at the disposal of the King's ministers (whoever they might be), because he was financially dependent on obtaining (a total of three) sinecure offices and a pension, which offset his expenses of bribing the electorate, and his gambling debts."--Wikipedia.
 

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Page 317 - STOOD in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs; A palace and a prison on each hand : I saw from out the wave her structures rise As from the stroke of the enchanter's wand : A thousand years their cloudy wings expand Around me. and a dying Glory smiles O'er the far times when many a subject land Looked to the winged Lion's marble piles, Where Venice sate in state, throned on her hundred isles ! II.
Page 216 - For there is no man that imparteth his joys to his friend, but he joyeth the more; and no man that imparteth his griefs to his friend, but he grieveth the less.
Page 194 - And among these nations shalt thou find no ease, neither shall the sole of thy foot have rest: but the Lord shall give thee there a trembling heart, and failing of eyes, and sorrow of mind...
Page 84 - Thus he continued giving his dying benedictions to all around him. On Monday morning a lucid interval gave some small hopes, but these vanished in the evening, and he continued dying, but with very little uneasiness, till Tuesday morning, August 22, when, between seven and eight o'clock, he expired, almost without a groan.
Page 84 - On the evening, when the symptoms of death came on, he said, ' I shall die ; but it will not be your fault.' When lord and lady Valentia came to see his lordship, he gave them his solemn benediction, and said, ' Be good, be virtuous, my lord ; you must come to this.
Page 372 - Men some to business, some to pleasure take ; But every woman is at heart a rake : Men some to quiet, some to public strife ; But every lady would be queen for life.
Page 275 - ... commenced without hesitation ? I am not, I confess, well informed of the resources of this kingdom, but I trust it has still sufficient to maintain its just rights, though I know them not. Any state, my lords, is better than despair. Let us at least make one effort, and if we must fall, let us fall like men.
Page 54 - Roman emperor's determination, oderint dum metuant; he used no allurements of gentle language, but wished to compel rather than persuade. His style is copious without selection, and forcible without neatness ; he took the words that presented themselves ; his diction is coarse and impure ; and his sentences are unmeasured.
Page 83 - It is a folly, a keeping me in misery, now to attempt to prolong life;' yet he was easily persuaded for the satisfaction of others to do or take anything thought proper for him.
Page 274 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy! Pressed down as I am by the hand of infirmity, I am little able to assist my country in this most perilous conjuncture; but, my Lords, while I have sense and memory, I will never consent to deprive the royal offspring of the House of Brunswick, the heirs of the Princess Sophia, of their fairest inheritance.

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