Rider's Washington: A Guide Book for Travelers, with 3 Maps and 22 Plans

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Fremont Rider, Frederic Taber Cooper
Macmillan, 1922 - Washington (D.C.) - 548 pages
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Page 383 - We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven ; that which we are, we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
Page 357 - IN THIS TEMPLE AS IN THE HEARTS OF THE PEOPLE FOR WHOM HE SAVED THE UNION THE MEMORY OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN IS ENSHRINED FOREVER In the side halls, on N.
Page 381 - Can any mortal mixture of earth's mould Breathe such divine enchanting ravishment ? Sure something holy lodges in that breast, And with these raptures moves the vocal air To testify his hidden residence.
Page 257 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 247 - It is too probable that no plan we propose will be adopted. Perhaps another dreadful conflict is to be sustained. If, to please the people, we offer what we ourselves disapprove, how can we afterwards defend our work? Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest can repair: the event is in the hands of God.
Page 112 - I make a drying-room of, to hang up the clothes in. The principal stairs are not up, and will not be this winter.
Page 361 - BE NOBLE ! and the nobleness that lies In other men, sleeping, but never dead, Will rise in majesty to meet thine own...
Page 95 - In concluding his farewell sermon, he said, that, in the language of Holy Writ, " there was a time for all things ; a time to preach, and a time to pray, but those times had passed away...
Page 258 - To INCREASE KNOWLEDGE. It is proposed — 1. To stimulate men of talent to make original researches, by offering suitable rewards for memoirs containing new truths; and, — 2. To appropriate annually a portion of the income for particular researches, under the direction of suitable persons.
Page 393 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with th' abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life.

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