The World, by Adam Fitz-Adam, Volume 4

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Page 135 - In these two princely boys! They are as gentle As zephyrs, blowing below the violet, Not wagging his sweet head: and yet as rough, Their royal blood enchafd, as the rud'st wind, That by the top doth take the mountain pine, And make him stoop to the vale.
Page 220 - ... for keeping : every age has degenerated ; and, from the fall of the first man, my unfortunate ancestor, our species has been tumbling on, century by century, from bad to worse, for about six thousand years. Considering this progressive state of deterioration, it is a very great mercy that things are no worse with us at present ; since, geometrically speaking, the human ought by this time to have sunk infinitely below the brute and the vegetable species, which...
Page 94 - If you play your cards well there, you may conclude yourself a tolerable master of the game. When you are in the country, play frequently with your neighbours and tenants ; they generally play better than finer folks, and will greatly improve you in the plain rules of the game. Avoid the general error of this game, of fancying that every body plays better at it than yourself.
Page 15 - Ihort, they are fit only to be inhabitants of Lubberland, where, as the child's geography informs us, men lie upon their backs with their mouths open, and it rains fat pigs, ready roafted. From this principle, when the pride they have infufed into their fervants has produced a proportionable degree of lazinefs, their own lazinefs is too prevalent, to fuffer them to ftruggle with that of their fervants ; and they rather chufe that all...
Page 47 - ... which he cannot now procure by his flight ; that the bull, baited with all the cruelties that human ingenuity, or human malevolence can invent, was once...
Page 241 - ... either of being polite or entertaining without it. That it is easily learnt is the happy advantage of it; for as it requires little more than a mind well stored with the most natural...
Page 43 - By the loud trumpet summon'd to the charge, See, all the formidable sons of fire, Eruptions, earthquakes, comets, lightnings, play Their various engines ; all at once disgorge Their blazing magazines ; and take, by storm, This poor terrestrial citadel of man.
Page 175 - ... foundation in truth, they may have an opportunity of adding another proof to the multitudes they are daily giving, that they want only to be told of their errors to amend them. Of the...
Page 84 - David set apart a charge upon the revenue his son was to enjoy after "him, towards building a temple, which he found was not to be the glory of his own reign. Another error which I hope to set right, arises from the general idea of poverty, which seems not to be very well settled.
Page 245 - I have, however, remarked one, in which the means do not feem to me to anfwer the end propofed, or, at leaft, that ought to be propofed, by them. The inftance I mean is the regimentals now worn in the army. One would imagine, from contemplating the profeffion...

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