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MINERAL CONCESSIONS GRANTED IN BURMA DURING 1937.*

The number of concessions granted during the year was 317, of which 178 were new prospecting licences, 93 were renewals of previously granted prospecting licences and 46 were mining leases. The total number of concessions held on the 31st December 1937 was 597, of which 276 were held under mining leases and 321 under prospecting licenses. Details regarding the number of concessions classified according to the minerals for which they were granted are given below : (8) Tin

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (b) Oil-Shale(1) Issued during 1937

Nil. (2) Held on the 31st December 1937.

1 (c) Antimony(1) Issued during 1937

7 (2) Held on the 31st December 1937.

7 (d) Iron-ore(1) Issued during 1937

Nil. (2) Held on the 31st December 1937 (e) Gold

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937 (f) Gold and Plalinum-(1) Issued during 1937

5 (2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (g) Gold, Silver and Plalinum--(1) Issued during 1937

Vil. (2) Held on the 31st December 1937

1 (h) Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc(1) Issued during 1937

Nil. (2) Held on the 31st December 1937.

2 (i) Coal(1) Issued during 1937 .

2 (2) Hell on the 31st December 1937. (j) Lead and Copper(1) Issued during 19:37

1 (2) Held on the 31st December 1937.

1 * Taken from “ Report on the mineral production of Burma for the year 1937.

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(x) All minerals except Precious Stones

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (y) All minerals except Tin and Oil

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (z) All minerals except Oil, Tin and Wolfram

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (aa) All minerals except T'in and Wolfram

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (bb) All minerals except T'in, Oil and Precious Stones

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (cc) All minerals except Oil and Precious Slones

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937 (dd) All minerals except Gas and Precious Stones—'

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (ee) All minerals except Oil, Precious Stones and Jade

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (ff) Natural Petroleum (including natural gas)

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (gg) All minerals except natural Petroleum and natural Gas

(1) Issued during 1937

(2) Held on the 31st December 1937. (hh) Galona

(1) Issued during 1937
(2) Held on the 31st December 1937.

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THE WESTERN MARGIN OF THE EASTERN GHATS IN SOUTHERN

JEYPORE. BY H. CROOKSHANK, B.A., B.A.I.(DUB.),
Superintending Geologist, Geological Survey of India.
(With Plates 20 to 24.)

CONTENTS,

.

During the field seasons 1934-35 and 1935-36 I mapped a small

part of the western border of the great charnockite mass, which,

with the associated khondalites,

khondalites, forms the

Region mapped.

greater part of the hilly region known as the
Eastern Ghats. The area mapped lies between the Jam river and
Balimela (18° 15' : 82° 7'). This is a stretch of some 30 miles, only
a tenth part of the length of the range, but, judging from the des-
criptions of other portions by Dr. T. L. Walker (1900, pp. 166-176,
1902, pp. 1-21) and Mr. C. S. Middlemiss (1902, pp. 21-23, 1903,
pp. 23-25) it is quite typical.

Sir L. L. Fermor desired me to visit this region partly because
the natural border of the great crystalline area of Bastar and Jey-

am engaged in mapping, lies
Reasons for mapping.

there, and partly because he was very anxious

pore, which i

servers.

to ascertain whether the western margin of the Eastern Ghats was here a fault. The belief that such was the case was very generally held. It had originated by a tentative suggestion of Walker (1902, p. 10). Middlemiss did not subscribe to this belief in his published work, but he made suggestions similar to Walker's in his unpublished progress report for 1902-03. The strongest evidence of a faulted boundary seems, however, to be the regular linear boundary between the crystallines and the charnockites shown on the 1 inch to 32 miles geological map of India.

Such a fault, if the upthrow were to the east, might have raised the Eastern Ghats some thousands of feet, and an uplift of this nature would, according to Fermor (1935, p. 48), account for the relatively high grade of metamorphism met with in some of the rocks of this region.

In discussing the nature of the margin of the Eastern Ghats the views of earlier observers must be considered. Walker and

Middlemiss are

are the only geologists who had Views of earlier ob- visited this region before me. Of these two

Walker's views are the more important because he mapped a large part of the boundary region. Middlemiss mapped for the most part further to the east and only made a few traverses as far west as the boundary.

In 1899 Walker mapped most of central Jeypore including the area immediately north of my map. In his published description

of this area (1910, p. 171) he makes the Walker's evidence. following remarks about

the charnockites and their boundary with the crystalline schists lying further to the west.

'I am inclined to regard these hypersthene rocks' (i.e., the charnockites) 'as forming a great igneous stock, though it would be very difficult to prove conclusively that this was the case'. Again he reports numerous small hills of the same lithological character as the large massif, not indicated in the accompanying geologically coloured map, lie like islands in the schist complex '.

The following is his description of the boundary :

' The actual contact with the crystalline schist is nowhere exposed and the boundaries of the islands as well as the main massif as marked on the geological map, are only approximate at best'. His map, however, showed that he thought the boundary an irregular

one.

H

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