A System of Oral Surgery: Being a Treatise on the Diseases and Surgery of the Mouth, Jaws, Face, Teeth, and Associate Parts

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1884 - Dentistry, Operative - 1037 pages
 

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Page 574 - A strong solution of salt was applied b/ means of a camel-hair brush to the fauces, palate, floor of the mouth, lips, and inner surface of the cheek, with the result of something being felt in the mouth, but no idea formed as to its nature. "'2. About a quarter of a teaspoonful of finely-powdered sugar was placed on the floor of the mouth, and, having been allowed to remain there a few seconds, was then brought thoroughly into contact with every part of the cavity without any recognition of its nature...
Page 488 - Dr. Falot refutes the authors who believe that the blue line along the gums is formed by an accidental deposit on the buccal mucous membrane of lead furnished by dust contained in the air or food, or still more in fluids that have been adulterated or accidentally charged. According to M Grisolle, among others, the blue line is the livery of the lead-worker, not a symptom of poisoning, but a simple deposit, and a sign of the worker's occupation. M. Falot quotes the observations of Beau, Barlow, Gregory...
Page 166 - But on suffering the liquid to evaporate so as to bring the upper end of the metal near to its surface, the instant the slightest portion becomes exposed chemical action immediately begins." " Two equal portions of wire were similarly placed in acid, only that one was fully exposed to the atmosphere in an open tube, while the other was placed in a phial, the acid occupying half its height, and was kept closely corked for several...
Page 92 - ... sac, as it is understood, being a mucous membrane. Between the enamel thus formed and the dentine exists the primary sac; simply the modified mucous membrane, which we first saw as overlying the papilla. The sac of mucous membrane — tunica propria, as it...
Page 715 - ... possibly, blood; but neither existed ; and the state of the parts cannot be better described than by saying that scarcely the least indication remained of either the place where the flap of skin was laid on the fascia, or the means by which they were united. It was not possible to distinguish the relation which these parts held to each other from that which naturally exists between subcutaneous fat and the fat beneath it.
Page 69 - ... of the tentorium. Now that the dura mater has been raised from the lateral part of the middle cranial fossa, the further relations of these nerve-roots within the cranium may be studied.
Page 140 - After the first month, bread and water sweetened with brown sugar is given several times a day, and during the night the child is, when not too soundly asleep, constantly at the breast. As soon as the little ill-used creature can sit erect on its mother's arm, it has at parents...
Page 153 - ... parts, or a little more than two-thirds of the whole. Now, by reference to the same work, we find, in a communication from a Mr. Bentz, the difference in weight of a barrel of flour, without the bran, and when only the outer coating of the wheat is taken off. He says : 'The weight of the bran or outer coating would, therefore, in the common superfine flour, constitute the offal, weighing only 5^ Ibs. to the barrel of flour, while the ordinary weight of offal is from 65 to 70 Ibs. to each barrel...
Page 777 - arise from the position occupied by these teeth, so close to the joint of the lower jaw, where the mucous membrane is reflected from the gums to the cheek and fauces, combined with the very common condition, that the jaw is not sufficiently elongated backwards to allow the denta tapientice to range in the horizontal series with the other teeth.
Page 832 - ... cases of recovery after poisoning by the cobra and rattlesnake when excessive quantities of stimulants, such as alcohol and eau-de-luce, have been administered, as an encouragement to drench with the same agents, in the same excess, our tetanic patients. Ought not this suggestion to lead further? May not the connecting link between chilled wounds and spasmodic paroxysms be an animal poison generated in the wound during the process of healing ? And, being an animal poison, therefore poisonous...

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