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Synonyme. S. phylicifolia var. Koch Comm., p. 41.
The Seres. The female is described in Eng. Ft, and figured in Eng. Bot., where the style is repre.
sented too short (Smith Eng. Fl.); and in Sal. Wob.
Engravings. Eng. Bot., t. 23Å4.; Sal. Wob., No. 110.; and our fig. 110. in p. 1623.
Spec. Char., $c. Stem erect. Branches minutely downy. Leaves elliptic-

obovate, acute, crenate, slightly downy, glaucous beneath. Stipules vaulted. Ovary stalked, awl-shaped, silky. Style as long as the blunt notched stigmas. (Smith Eng. Fl.) A native of Britain, in Scotland, on the Breadalbane Mountains; and flowering in May. Taller than S. Andersoniana, an forming a small tree, with finely downy branches. Leaves larger and firmer than those of S. Andersoniana ; their upper surface of a darker or duller green, though more polished, scarcely downy, except the midrib and veins ; glaucous beneath, and finely veiny, with more downiness; their length 2 in. or 3 in.; the margin crenate, rather serrated; the young ones very densely silky, in the manner of the foregoing. Footstalks downy. Catkins of the female 1 in. long when in full bloom, and more than twice as much when the seeds are ripe. (Ibid.) In the Woburn collection there are three varieties of this species. The one described drops its leaves much earlier than either S. Andersoniana or S. rupestris, and is, according to Mr. Forbes, quite distinct. There are plants at Woburn and Henfield; also in the Goldworth and Hackney arboretums.

* 119. S. RUPE'STRIS Donn. The silky Rock Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Donn Hort, Cant., ed. 5., p. 231. (Smith); Eng. Bot., t. 2342. ; Rees's Cyclo., No. 123.;

Smith Eng. Fl., 4 p. 222. ; Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 111. ; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3.
The Sexes. Both sexes are described in Eng. Fl., and figured in Eng. Bot., and in Sal. Wob.
Engravings. Eng. Bot., t. 2342.; Sal. Wob., No. 111. ; and our fig. 111. in p. 431.
Spec. Char., fc. Stem trailing. Leaves obovate, acute, serrated, flat, even,

silky on both sides. Stipules hairy. Branches minutely downy. Ovary stalked, awl-shaped, silky. Style as long as the blunt undivided stigmas. (Smith Eng. Fl.) A native of Scotland, in woods and on the banks of rivers; and flowering in April. Stems trailing or depressed, with darkcoloured branches, covered with very fine down when young. Leaves about lin. long, obovate or elliptical, acute, even and flat, veiny, but not wrinkled ; finely and regularly serrated, beautifully silky with depressed hairs; more especially beneath, and when young. Footstalks downy, in the manner of the branches. Catkins appearing rather before the leaves, 4 in. long ; those of the female soon becoming thrice that length, and more lax. A perfectly distinct kind. The branches are tough, and suitable for tying and basket. work. There are plants at Woburn, Henfield, and Flitwick; and also in the Hackney and Goldworth arboretums.

* 120. S. TENUIFO'LIA L. The thin-leaved Willow. Identification. Lin. Fl

. Lapp., ed. 2., 292. . 8. f. c. (Smith.) The figure in that work_ represents only a foral leaf, and that unlike any that we have seen in our plant. (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) Smith Fl. Br., p. 1052. ; Eng. Fl., 4. p. 179., exclusively of the synonyme of Eng. Bot., t. 2186.

Forbes in Sal. Woh, No. 50.; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3. ; Borr. in Eng. Bot. Supp., t. 2795. Synonymes. S. arbúscula Wahlenb., var. Koch Comm., p. 45. “ ir Koch had known s. tenuifolia Smith Fl. Br. in the living plant, I think he would have referred it to his own S. phylicifdlia."

(Borrer in a letter.) S. tenuifolia of Eng. Bot., t. 2186., is S. bicolor Hook. Br. Fl. The Seres. Both sexes are described and figured in Engl. Bot. Supp., and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Lin. Fl. Lapp., ed. 2., 6. 8. f. c.; Sal. Wob., No. 50.; Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2795. ; and our

fig. 50. in p 1614. Spec. Char., &c. Upright. Young shoots and petioles densely pubescent. Disks

of leaves elliptical, or oblong, flat, with a recurved point, crenate, reticulated with sunken veins, slightly hairy; glaucous beneath. Stipules half-heartshaped. Catkins on a short stalk that bears small leaves. Bractea oblong, shaggy. Ovary glabrous, on a glabrous stalk. Style as long as the stigmas. A link between the Sálices nigricantes and Salices bicolòres of Hook. Br. Fl., mostallied, perhaps, to the former; and, indeed, so nearly to S. rupestris, that we cannot undertake to point out satisfactory distinctions. (Borrer in E. B. Suppl.) A native of England, above the bridge at Kirkby Lonsdale. The fol. lowing

are some of the features of the kind, as it is described by Mr. Borrer :“A much-branched spreading shrub, 10 ft. or 12 ft. high. Twigs very downy

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when young, afterwards glabrous, or nearly so, and shining, green, or tinged,
especially in the female, with brown. Petioles downy, spreading, rather
long: Leaves by no means remarkably thin; ovate or more or less rhomboid,
and having a short, decurved, somewhat twisted point; on strong young
shoots more oblong; dark green above and moderately shining ; glaucous
beneath ; sprinkled, when young, on both surfaces with appressed hairs,
some of which remain in the advanced state; veins sunken on the upper
surface, very prominent on the under one; margin rather closely serrate, or
rather crenate, especially about the middle of the leaf, with a glandular
tooth in the notches. Stipules small, except on very vigorous shoots, half-
heart-shaped, pointed, serrated, beset with glands on the edges and on the
lower part of the disk. Catkins appearing in May, before the expansion of
the leaves; cylindrical, about 1 in. long when in full flower. Flowers closely
imbricated. Stamens thrice as long as the bractea.” There are plants at

Woburn, Henfield, and Flitwick, and also in the Goldworth Arboretum.
? Variety. Mr. Borrer states that he has, in his collection at Henfield, from

the same locality as the species, what seems a variety of it; having silky
hairs on the upper half of the ovary and towards the base of its stalk. This
is, perhaps, the plant mentioned in the Flora Britannica, as deserving further
investigation. (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.)
* 121. S. PROPI'NQUA Borr. The nearly related, or flat-lcaved, upright,

Mountain Willow.
Identification. Borr. in Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2729.; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3.
The Sexes. The female is described in the Speeific Character ; and described and figured in Eng.

Bot, Suppl.
Engraving. Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2729.
Spec. Char., fc. Upright. Young shoots pubescent with minute down.

Leaves elliptical, obscurely crenate, nearly fat, nearly glabrous on both
surfaces; veins slightly sunken; under surface pale green. Stipules small,
vaulted, glanded. Ovaries stalked, silky towards the point. Style longer
than the notched stigmas. (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) Finding in this
some apparently distinctive characters, we venture, after much hesitation,
to add another presumed species to a section of the genus, of which almost
every species is doubtful. It was discovered in Britain by Mr. Anderson,
and we know it only from plants received from him. Planted by the side
of S. petræ'a, it has attained, in the same period, scarcely half the height of
that. (Ibid.) S. petræ'a is, in some instances, more than 15 ft. high. There
are plants at Henfield, and in the Goldworth Arboretum.

$ 122. S. PETRÆ'Anders. The Rock Sallow, or Willow. Identification. First distinguished by Mr. G. Anderson, who is understood to have given to it the

name of S. petræ'a. (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 97. ; Borrer in Eng.

Bot. Suppl., t. 2725. ; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3. Synonymes. S. arbúscula Wahlenb., Koch Comm., p. 45., where Koch has remarked that he has thus adjudged the S. petræ`a Anderson from a specimen derived from Anderson. " It is surely by error that Koch has placed S. petræ'a under his S. arbúscula, with S. phylicifdlia Smith, and not under his own S. phylicifolia, with $. Ammanniana and its allies." (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) If Koch had known the S. petræ`a in the living plant, I believe that he would have referred it to his own S. phylicifolia. (Borrer in a letter.) The Sexes. The female is described and figured in Eng. Bot. Suppl., and in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 97.; Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2725. ; and our fig. 97. in p. 1620. Spec. Char., fc. Upright. Young shoots densely hairy. Leaves oblong, ser

rated, carinate, twisted, reticulated with deeply sunken veins; beneath, hairy, glaucous, at length pale green. Stipules large, half-heart-shaped, fattish, having few glands. Ovary stalked, naked, wrinkled towards the point. Style divided, longer than the cloven stigmas. S. petræ'a is nearly allied to S. hírta Smith Eng. Bot., t. 1404.; and still more nearly, perhaps, to S. stylàris of Seringe Monogr. des Saules de la Suisse, p. 62. (Borr. in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) A British kind of willow, first distinguished by the late Mr. G. Anderson, who communicated the plants from which our figure was drawn. We have wild specimens from the mountains of Breadalbane. The kind is a shrub, in some instances upwards of 15 ft. high, with crooked ash-coloured

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branches and brown twigs. Young shoots covered with short, horizontal, or deflexed hairs. Leaves on the upper surface slightly hairy, very dark green and shining; on the under one, bluish, and rather more hairy, or woolly; ; at length glabrous on both surfaces, except on the petiole and midrib, and losing, or very nearly losing, the glaucous tinge on the under one; the edges slightly recurved, serrated throughout with blunt glandtipped teeth. Stipules remarkably large, serrated, having glands at the edge, and a few on the disk, near the point of insertion. The kind is remarkable for the long, dark, shining, wavy leaves, and large stipules, of its strong shoots. The flowers come forth with the young leaves about the beginning of May. Catkin, in the earliest state of flowering, ovate, and usually less than 4 in. long; but it gradually becomes cylindrical, and 3 or 4 times as long. (Ibid.) There are plants at Woburn, Henfield, and Flitwick.

* 123. S AMMANNIANA Willd. Ammann's Willow. Identification. Willd. Sp. Pl., 4. p. 663. ; Smith in Rees's Cyclo., No. 21. Synonymes. S. phylicifolia var. Koch Comm., p. 41. ; S. Myrsinites Hoff Sal., 1. p. 71. t. 17, 18, 19, and 24. 6. 2. (Smith in Rees's Cyclo.) "S.stylaris Seringe. Monogr. des Saules de la Suisse, p. 62., is regarded as S. Ammannidna Willd. (Borver, incidentally in Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2725.) The Seres. The female is noticed in the Specific Character, Engravings. Hoffm. Sal., 1. p. 71. t. 17, 18, 19, and 24. f. 2. (Smith.) Spec. Char., &c. Leaves oblong-elliptical, acute, serrate, glabrous; glaucous

beneath. Petiole long, downy. Stipules ovate, dentate, persistent. Catkins protruded before the leaves. Ovaries lanceolate, glabrous. (Willd.) Wild in the alps of Salzburg and Carinthia. (Id. and Smith.) Introduced in 1821.

* 124. S. ATROVI'RENS Forbes. The dark-green Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal, Wob., No. 108. The Seres. Both sexes are described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 108.; and our fig. 108. in p. Spec. Char., fc. Leaves ovate-acute, bluntly serrated, nearly glabrous, heartshaped at the base. Footstalks rather short, downy. Stipules large, rounded, serrated. Ovary awl-shaped, on a short stalk, downy. Style glabrous, longer than the parted stigmas. (Sal. Wob., p. 215.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in 1824, and flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in May. An upright shrub or tree, attaining the height of 10 ft. or 12 ft. Branches dark brown, round, downy, and slightly striated. Leaves above 2 in. long, 14 in. broad, of an ovate-heart-shaped figure, slightly hairy; glaucous beneath, with a downy midrib and prominent arched veins; margins bluntly serrated. Footstalks short. Catkins of the male rather more than ļ in. long, and appearing with the leaves. A very distinct species, and easily distinguished by its dark green leaves, which are generally heart-shaped at the base.

125. S. stre'rida Forbes. The creaking Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Sal. Wob., No. 100. The Seres. The female is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 100.; and our fig. 100. in p. 1621. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves obovate-elliptical, acute, pubescent, glaucous beneath ; margins denticulated; the tip oblique. Stipules half-heart-shaped, serrated, and glabrous. Catkins oblong. Capsules awl-shaped, silky. Style long. Stigmas bifid. (Sal. Wob., p. 199.) A native of Switzerland." Introduced in 1820, and flowering in March and April. This plant forms a straggling bush, producing rather long pendulous branches, of a pale greenish colour, very pubescent, and soft to the touch; perfectly round. Buds of a purplish colour, and iry. Leaves about 2 in. long, and broadest about the middle; the tip oblique, acute, and nearly entire; margins dentated, or slightly serrated; the lower serratures, in some of the leaves, sometimes elongated; upper surface of a dull green, pubescent; under surface glaucous, hairy, with a pale, prominent, and downy midrib. Footstalks rather short, sometimes tinged with red. Catkins of the female 1 in. long. The shoots unfit for basketwork. There are plants at Woburn, and in the Goldworth and Hackney arboretums.

The Seres. The female is described in Sal. Wob.

126. S. so'rdida Forbes. The sordid Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 101. The Šeres. The male is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 101.; and our fig. 101. in p. 1621. Spec. Char., fc. Leaves lanceolate, serrated, pubescent, and glaucous beneath.

Stipules rounded, toothed, glandular. Catkins numerous, recurved. Filaments whitish. Anthers yellow. Bractea obovate, slightly fringed. (Sal. Wob., p. 201.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in ? 1824; flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in April. It is a bushy, upright-growing shrub, with yellow, round, pubescent branches, which are variously marked with small black spots. Buds yellow, rather longer than in S. strépida. (Forbes.) Leaves from 2 in. to 24 in. long, and about 1 in. broad, of an elliptic-lanceolate shape, remotely serrated, the serratures furnished with glands ; upper surface pubescent, but ultimately becoming nearly glabrous ; glaucous beneath, with a densely pubescent midrib. Footstalks nearly fin. long, slender. Catkins appearing before the leaves; all inclining towards one side of the branch ; very numerous. The twigs are brittle, and unfit for basketwork. There are plants at Woburn, Flitwick, Henfield, and Hackney.

127, S. SCHLEICHERIA NA Forbes. Schleicher's Willow, or Sallow. Identification.. Sal. Wob., No. 98. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 98. ; and our fig. 98. in p. 1620. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves elliptic, acute, serrated, dark green ; villous above,

glaucous and pubescent beneath. Germens awl-shaped, glabrous, stalked. Style twice as long as the undivided ovate stigmas. Stipules half-ovate, serrated. (Sal. Wob., p. 195.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in 1824; flowering in April and May. This species forms a very bushy head, attaining the height of 12 ft. or 15 ft., spreading obliquely, with round dark brown branches, copiously covered with a sort of pubescence when young, which continues, to a certain degree, on the preceding year's shoots. Leaves from 1} in. to 2 in. long, elliptic, acute; shining and villous on their upper surface; glaucous and hairy beneath ; often contracted at the base; the young ones densely covered with long silky hairs, but losing their pubescence as they advance in age, and ultimately becoming almost glabrous. Footstalks slender, about 4 in. long. Catkins from 1} in. to 2 in. long, expanding with the leaves. There are plants at Woburn and Henfield; and also in the Goldworth and Hackney arboretums.

128. S. GRISONE'nsis Forbes. The Grisons Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob, No. 99. The Sexes. The female is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 99.; and our fig:+99. in p. 1620. Spec. Char., &c. Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, glabrous; deep green,

shining above; paler glaucous beneath. Stipules half-heart-shaped, toothed, glabrous. Ovary ovate-lanceolate, somewhat downy, on a short stalk. Style glabrous, longer than the cloven stigmas. (Sal. Wob., p. 197.) A native of the Grisons. Introduced in ? 1824, and flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in March and April. A shrub, much resembling S. Schleicheriana in size and mode of growth ; but the leaves are much longer, and likewise the catkins, by which it is readily distinguished from that species. The branches are brownish green, glabrous, and shining, after the first year ; young ones reddish brown, pubescent, but becoming glabrous in autumn. Leaves from 2 in. to 3 in. long, elliptic-lanceolate ; their breadth 1 in, or more; deep green, glabrous, and shining on their upper surface; glaucous and paler beneath; pubescent in their young state ; their margins furnished with shallow serratures, entire towards their extremities. Footstalks d in, or

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