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P. 1623.

covered with minute, depressed, scattered hairs; under side pale, or slightly glaucous, more loosely hairy, especially the rib and transverse parallel veins the subdivisions of which compose a fine rectangular network. Catkins much earlier than the foliage. (Ibid.) This is a readily distinguished species; and the leaves are more heart-shaped at the base than even those of S. hírta. There are plants at Woburn, Henfield, and Flitwick.

* 1 105. S. ui'rta Smith. The hairy-branched Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Smith Eng. Bot., t. 1404. ; Rees's Cyclo., No. 121. ; Willd. Sp. Pl., 4. p. 696. ; Smith

Eng. Fl., 4. 221.; Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 115. į Hook. Br. F1., ed. 3. The first four of these, at least, relate to the male only: the fifth relates to both sexes. See, also, under Synonyme. Synonyme. S. picta Schleicher is the female of S. hírta. (Forbes in Sal. Wob.) The Scres. The male is described in Eng. Fl., and figured in Eng. Bot. and Sal. Wob. The female is

described in Sal. Wob., and in Hook. Br. F2, ed. 2. Engrarings. Eng. Bot., t. 1404. ; Sal. Wob, No. 113. ; and our fig. 113. in Spec. Char., 8c. Stem erect. Branches densely hairy. Leaves elliptic-heartshaped, pointed, finely crenate, downy on both sides. Stipules half-heartshaped, flat, toothed, and nearly glabrous. (Smith Eng. Fl.) A native of Britain, in woods and on the banks of rivers; flowering in May. A small tree, remarkable for its thick, round, hoary branches, clothed very densely with prominent, close, horizontal, soft, cottony hairs. Leaves elliptic-oblong, a little heart-shaped, or cut away, at the base; from 2 in. to 3 in. in length, and at least 1 in. in breadth ; sharp-pointed and flat, bordered with shallow serratures, or blunt notches; the upper surface of a dull green, minutely hairy; under side pale or glaucous, and more densely downy, particularly the rib and veins, which last are reticulated like those of S. cotinifolia Smith. Footstalks stout, densely downy, in. long. Catkins 1 in. or more in length. (Ibid.) There are plants at Woburn and Henfield; and in the Goldworth and Hackney arboretums.

106. S. RIVULA'ris Forbes, The River Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Sal. Wob., No. 102. The Sere's. The female is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 102. ; and our fig. 102. in p. 1621. Spec. Char., fc. Branches erect. Leaves elliptical, glabrous ; glaucous and

pubescent beneath when young; dark green on their upper surface. Stipules rounded, serrated. Catkins obtuse, short. Ovary stalked, ovate-lanceolate, slightly downy. Style about the length of the parted stigmas. (Sal. Wob., p. 203.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in ? 1824; and flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in May. An erect-growing shrub, with dark mahogany-coloured branches, nearly perpendicular in their mode of growth, copiously marked with yellow dots; the young ones green and pubescent. Leaves from lin. to 14 in. long, with short oblique points ;

generally unequal at the base; finely serrated; green and villous above · when young; glaucous and hairy beneath, but soon losing their glaucous

hue, and much of their pubescence; the older leaves are bright green, and almost glabrous on both sides. Footstalks rather long, slender. Catkins on short thick stalks, scarcely 1 in. long. There are plants at Woburn, Flitwick, Goldworth, and Hackney. In the latter arboretum is a variety named S. rivulàris minor Lodd. Cat., ed. 1836. * 107. S. ATROPURPU'REA Forbes. The dark-purple-branched Willow, or

Sallow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 156. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves ovate, serrated; somewhat heart-shaped and unequal

at the base; dark green, shining above; glaucous and finely hairy beneath. Footstalks nearly lin. long, downy. Stipules very large, half-heartshaped, serrated, glabrous. Filaments yellow. (Sal. Wob., p. 284.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in 1824, and flowering in April. This is a low tree, with darkish brown branches, afterwards inclining to purple, which are copiously covered with minute hairs, and marked with small

The Scres. The male is described in Sal. Wob.

yellow spots, and are very brittle. The leaves are from 14 in. to 2 in. long, and nearly 14 in. in breadth, when fully grown; of an ovate, or somewhat heart-like, shape at their base, and oblique at their tip. Upper surface dark green and shining; underneath, veiny, minutely hairy, and glaucous. Footstalks nearly 1 in. long, dilated at the base, and downy. This species, although it bears some resemblance to S. rivulàris, is yet very

distinct. The young shoots are brittle, and not adapted for basketwork. en 108. S. CORIACEA Forbes. The coriaceous-leaved, or leathery, Willow, or

Sallow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 112. The Sexes. Both sexes are described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 112. ; and our fig. 112. in p.1623. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves elliptical, slightly obovate, acute, denticulated, crisped,

pubescent, reticulated and glaucous beneath. Stamens long, white. Anthers 4-celled, yellow. Catkins of the female about 1 in. long, thick, obtuse. Ovary nearly sessile, ovate-lanceolate, very downy. Style longer than the deeply parted stigmas. Bractea ovate-lanceolate, hairy. 'Stipules rounded, serrated, glabrous. (Sal. Wob., p. 223.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in ? 1825, and flowering in March. This is a low-growing bushy shrub, attaining to the height of 7 ft. or 8 ft., with round pubescent branches, of a pale green colour, remotely marked with yellow spots. Leaves about 2 in. long, elliptic-obovate, acute; margins denticulated, crisped; upper surface of a dull shining green, besprinkled with minute appressed hairs; glaucous beneath, pubescent, with a prominent midrib, and with arched hairy veins; the substance of the leaves of a thick leathery texture. Footstalks stoutish and yellow. Catkins nearly 1 in. long, densely downy before they are expanded. There are plants at Woburn, Flitwick, and Hackney.

109. S. NI'GRICANS Smith. The dark broad-leaved Willow. Identification. Smith Eng. Bot., t. 1913.;' Willd. Sp. Pl., 4. p. 659.; Smith Eng. Fl., 4. p. 172. ;

Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 37. ; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3. Synonyme. $. phylicifolia B Lin. Sp. Pl., 1442., F1. Lapp., No. 350. t. 8. f.c. (Smith from Herb. Lin.), Koch Comm., p. 41. The Seres. Smith has described both sexes in Eng. Fl. ; the female from Lapland specimens : the male is figured in Eng. Bot. and Sal. Wob. The S. nigréscens Schl., female, is tigured in Sal. Wob., as the female of S. nigricans Smith. It does not appear that the flowers of the female have been

found wild in Britain. (Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 2.) Engravings. Lin. Fl. Lapp., t. 8. f. c.; Eng. Bot., t. 1213. ; Sal. Wob., No. 37.; and our fig. 37. in Spec. Char., &c. Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, acute, crenate ; glabrous, with a

downy rib, above; glaucous beneath. Stamens 2, thrice the length of the hairy bractea. Ovary lanceolate, downy, on a short downy stalk. (Smith Eng. Fl.) The male plant is a native of Britain, in fens, osier grounds, woods, and thickets. The female plant in the Woburn coilection is the S. nigréscens of Schleicher, which was introduced about 1825, or before. The male plant in the Woburn collection forms a large bushy shrub, scarcely attaining the height or form of a tree, with upright, round, stout, rather brittle branches, glabrous, except when young. The catkins appear in April, much earlier than the foliage; and those of the males, when full grown, are 1} in. long. The leaves are from 1 in. to 1ļin. broad, and from 4 in. to 5 in. long. According to Smith, S. nigricans is of no use in the arts.

There are plants at Woburn, Flitwick, Henfield, and Hackney. * 110. S. ANDERSONIA'NA Smith. Anderson’s Willow, or the Green Mountain

Sallow. Identification. Smith Eng. Bot., 2343. ; Rees's Cyclo., No. 123. ; Eng. F1., 4. p. 223.; Forbes in Sal.

Wob., No. 109.; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3. Synonyme. S. phylicifolia var. Koch Comm. The Sexes. The female is described in Eng. Fl., and figured in Eng. Bot. and in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Eng. Bot., t. 2313.; Sal. Wob., No. 109.; and our fig. 109. in p. 1623. Sper. Char., &c. Stem upright. Leaves elliptical, acute, finely notched,

slightly downy, paler beneath. Stipules half-ovate, nearly glabrous. Branches minutely downy. Ovary glabrous ; its stalks almost equal to the bractea.

p. 1611.

ed. S.

F., p. 284. The Seres.

Style cloven, longer than the cloven stigmas. (Smith Eng. Fl.) A native of Scotland, on the Breadalbane Mountains; and England, on the banks of the Tyne below Newcastle. Stem bushy; its branches, which are green the first summer, and afterwards of a sooty brown, are clothed with dense, short, curved down, which finally disappears from the older ones. Leaves of a rich bright green, blackish when dried, from l in. to 1} in. long, broadly elliptical, acute, scarcely pointed, flat, finely crenate, or copiously and bluntly serrated; paler, but not glaucous, underneath ; more or less downy on both sides, especially the midrib and veins, with minute hairs, their substance thin and pliant; the very young ones silky. Footstalks downy, and rather short. Catkins of ripe capsules not above 1 in. long. (Ibid.) There are

plants at Woburn, Flitwick, Henfield, and Hackney. Varieties. Mr. Forbes states that he has three varieties of S. Andersoniàna, in

one of which the catkins are much shorter, and the capsules more loosely set on the rachis, or axis, of the catkin, than in the one figured in the Salictum Woburnense. (Sal. Wob.)

. 111. S. DAMASCE'NA Forbes. The Damson-leaved Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 157.; Bor. in Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2709.; Hook. Br. Fl., Synonymes. S. damascenifolia Anderson MSS.; S. phylicifolia Lin., a state of, Lindl. Synops. Br.

The female is described in Sal. Wob., and described in Eng. Bot. Suppl. “Mr. Anderson possessed both sexes, but we have seen the female only.(Borrer.) Engraving. Eng. Bot. Suppl., t. 2709. Spec. Char., &c. Upright. Young shoots densely hairy. Leaves ovate, or rhomboidal, bluntly toothed ; silky when young; at length nearly glabrous; green on both surfaces. Stipules half-heart-shaped. Catkins, with the flowers in blossom, longer than the floral leaves. Bracteas (scales) obovate. Ovary stalked, glabrous. Style divided, longer than the diverging stigmas. (Borrer in Eng. Bot. Suppl.) Perhaps too nearly allied to S. Andersoniana to be properly regarded as a species. In that, the leaves, especially the lower ones, are more oblong, and their under side is not so absolutely devoid of a glaucous tinge; the catkins are shorter, and rarely overtop the larger, and generally leat-like, bracteas of the catkin. The flowers, except that they are more loosely set, and their bracteas (scales) more oblong and blacker, are very nearly the same in structure. If the footstalk of the germen sometimes naked (a state which we have not seen), it is usually hairy. (Ibid.) The late Mr. G. Anderson communicated to Mr. Borrer, in 1813, under the manuscript name of S. damascenifolia, the S. damascèna Forbes, as a species obtained from the south of Scotland and the borders, that he had cultivated for five years. The flowers appear with the young leaves, about the middle of April

. The plant is a very upright shrub, about 12 ft. high. The following description is quoted from Mr. Forbes :-“ Stem and branches erect, of a dark brown mahogany colour, copiously marked with small yellow spots; round and brittle. The leaves are from 1 in. to 14 in. long, and rather more than in. in breadth, of an elliptic figure, bluntly serrated ; the serratures furnished with glands towards the points of the leaf; deep green and shining above, reticulated and glabrous beneath; the prominent arched veins only besprinkled with a few long hairs; the young leaves hairy, but ultimately losing their pubescence and their glaucous hue. Foot stalks long, slender, downy on both sides, and brown. The leaves and young twigs of this species very much resemble those of the damson plum, and of S. Andersoniana. There are plants at Henfield.

* 112. S. ANSONIANA Forbes. Anson's Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 107. The Šeres. The female is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 107.; and our fig. 107. in p. 1622. Spec. Char., fc. Leaves elliptic, acute, bluntly and deeply serrated, glabrous; bright green and shining above; beneath, glaucous and besprinkled with minute appressed hairs. Stipules large, rounded, serrated, glabrous. Ovary ovate-lanceolate, slightly downy. Style thick, glabrous, twice the length of the parted stigmas. (Šal. Wob., p. 213.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in ? 1824, and flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in March and April. A spreading bushy shrub, producing long, dark, mahogany-coloured branches, which are glabrous and shining after the first year; the younger ones reddish brown and pubescent. Leaves from 1 in. to 11 in. long, bluntly and deeply serrated, sometimes a little wavy and unequal at the base; green and shining above, glaucous and hai beneath, but ultimately becoming nearly glabrous on both sides: the young leaves are very hairy when first expanded. Footstalks } in. long, brown and downy. Catkins appearing before the expansion of the leaves. This species, Mr. Forbes observes, is a very remarkable one. Its very dark mahoganycoloured branches, which are of a deeper hue than even those of S. bicolor and S. nigricans, readily distinguish it from any other species. There are plants at Henfield.

113. S. HELVE'tica Forbes. The Swiss Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 159. The Sexes. The female is described in Sal. Wob. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves ovate, acute, serrated; green, shining, and silky

above; glaucous and hairy underneath. Stipules large, half-heart-shaped, serrated. Catkins often recurved, about lin. in length. Ovary ovate, silky, stalked. Style divided. Stigmas notched. (Sal. Wob., p. 287.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in 1824, and flowering in April, and again in August, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey. This is a bushy tree, somewhat resembling S. Andersoniana in form of leaves and mode of growth. In the Woburn salictum, it grows to about 14 ft. high, with greenish brown, round, villous branches, which are copiously marked with yellow dots.

Leaves from 1.fin. to nearly 2 in. long, and about 1} in. in breadth ; ovate, acute, sometimes hollowed out at the base, finely serrated; green and shining above; glaucous, and besprinkled with minute hairs underneath. Footstalks above 3 in. long, villous, like the midrib. A very distinct species.

sim 117. S. Fi'RMA Forbes. The firm-leaved Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 106. The Seres. The female is described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 106.; and our fig. 106. in p. 1622. Spec. Char., &c. Leaves elliptic, obtuse, serrated, unequal at the base; green,

shining, and villous above; glaucous and minutely hairy beneath. Stipules large, rounded, glabrous. Catkins above 1 in. long, nearly sessile. Ovary ovate-lanceolate, nearly glabrous. Style longer than the parted stigmas. (Sal. Wob., p. 211.) A straggling bushy shrub, flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in March or April, and again in August; with dark brown glabrous branches, much resembling S. dùra in colour and mode of growth; but the leaves are very different in shape, being elliptical, broader above the middle, and furnished with shallow serratures: in their surfaces they have no material difference. Leaves about 2 in. long; often obtuse and unequal at the base; green, shining, and somewhat villous above; glaucous and besprinkled with minute hairs beneath; both surfaces becoming nearly glabrous. Footstalks about 1 in. long, pubescent, reddish. Twigs and branches very brittle. There are plants in the Goldworth and Hackney arboretums. * 115. S. CARPINIFO'LIA Schl, The Hornbeam-leaved Sallow, or

Willow. Identification. ? Schleicher, as quoted in Hort. Brit., No. 24078.; Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 155. Synonyme. S. phylicifolia var. Koch Comm., p. 42.

The Sexes. The female is described in Sal. Wob.

Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves ovate, acute, unequal, and a little heart-shaped at the base; the margins deeply serrated, and furnished with glands, a little wavy; upper surface shining and downy; under one glaucous, and besprinkled with small appressed hairs. Ovary ovate-subulate, glabrous. Style longer than the divided stigmas. (Sal. Iob., p. 283.) A native of Germany. Introduced in 1824, and Howering in March and April. A small bushy tree, with round villous branches, of a sooty brown colour. Buds hairy. Leaves from 1 in. to 14 in. long, of an ovate shape, deeply serrated, and somewhat wavy; unequal, and a little heart-shaped at the base; more or less downy on both sides, especially the midrib and, veins, with minute hairs; beneath, glaucous. Footstalks downy. Catkins lin. long. This species resembles, in leaves and mode of growth, S. rotundàta; but is a very distinct kind, having the leaves more obiong and undulated. There are plants at Woburn, and in the Hackney arboretum.

i 116. S. ROTUNDA TA Forbes. The round-leaved Willow, or Sallow. Identification. Sal. Wob., No. 104. Synonyme. ?S, rotundifolia llost. The Sims. Both sexes are described and figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 104. ; our fig. 1337., p. 1572. ; and fig. 104. in p. 1621. Spec. Char.,8c. Leaves orbicular, bluntly serrated; glabrous and shining above; glaucous, reticulated, and slightly hairy beneath. Stipules rounded, serrated, glandular. Ovary awl-shaped, glabrous, stalked. Style twice the length of the parted stigmas. (Sal. Wob., p. 207.) A native of Switzerland. Introduced in ?1824, and flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in April and May. An upright-growing shrub or low tree, attaining the height of 15 ft. or more; the preceding year's branches of a brownish green colour, marked with several yellow spots, and retaining their pubescence; very brittle; the young twigs round, densely hairy, and copiously covered with leaves. Leaves orbicular, somewhat heart-shaped at the base when fully grown, bluntly serrated; glabrous and shining above; glaucous, reticulated, and very minutely hairy beneath, becoming almost glabrous when at maturity: Footstalks stout, and densely downy. Catkins of the male nearly 1 in. long. The roundness of the leaves renders this a very distinct species. There are plants at Woburn, Henfield, and Goldworth.

1 117. S. du'ra Forbes. The hardy Sallow, or Willow. Identification. Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 105. The Scres. The male plant is figured in Sal. Wob. Engravings. Sal. Wob., No. 105.; and our fig. 105. in p. 1622. Spec. Char., fc. Leaves elliptical, deeply toothed, a little heart-shaped at the base ; green, shining, and villous above; glaucous and pubescent beneath. Stipules large, rounded, glabrous. Catkins short. Bractcas yellow, fringed. (Sal. Wob., p. 209.) A rapid-growing tree, flowering, in the willow garden at Woburn Abbey, in April and May; with dark brown, glabrous, round branches; the young ones reddish, and thickly covered with short white hairs, which disappear towards autumn; forming a bushy head, with long oblique twigs. The leaves are nearly 2 in. long, and 1} in. in breadth; of an elliptical-roundish shape, obtuse and somewhat heart-shaped at the base, with blunt oblique points; green, villous, and shining above ; glaucous and pubescent beneath, becoming nearly glabrous in autumn; their margins deeply toothed, the teeth furnished with glands, which are very conspicuous in the young leaves. Footstalks rather short, stout, and downy. Catkins about į in. long. A very distinct species; and, though of very rapid and vigorous growth, unfit, from the brittleness of its branches, for basketwork. There are plants at Woburn, Henfield, and Flitwick, and also in the Hackney and Goldworth arboretums. * 1 118. S. ForsTERIA'NA Smith. The glaucous Mountain Sallow, or

Forster's Willow. Identification. Smith Eng. Bot., t. 2341. ; Rees's Cyclo., No. 124. ; Smith Eng. Fl., 2. p. 224. ; Forbes in Sal. Wob., No. 110.; Hook. Br. Fl., ed. 3., p. 131.

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