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" There is no moral formula more frequently cited, and with more deserved admiration, than that maxim of doing to others as we would have them do to us : and, as Paley observes, no one probably ever was in practice led astray by it. "
The Freemason's Monthly Magazine - Page 379
1853
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose, Selected ...

Vicesimus Knox - English prose literature - 1790 - 1019 pages
...the advantages of faciety. From the two grand principles of " loving our neighbour as ourielves; and of doing to others, as we would have them do to us," which regulate our focial inttrcourfe in general, we proceed to thofe more confined duti«, which aiife...
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The Prose epitome; or, Extracts, elegant, instructive, and entertaining ...

Conduct of life - 1792 - 456 pages
...the advantages offocietj. From the t\vo grand principles of" loving our neighbour as ourfelvcs ; and of doing to others as we would have them do to us," wliich regulate our focial intercourfe in general, we proceed to thole more confined dutie» which...
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A Short and Plain Exposition of the Old Testament: With Devotional ..., Volume 1

Job Orton, Robert Gentleman - Bible - 1805
...us, though we did not come by it fraudulently, are each contrary to strict honesty, and to the rule of doing to others as we would have them do to us. 3. We learn to depend on God for the success of the best concerted measures. Jacob says, Take double...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts ..., Volume 4

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1816
...juftice and charity, comprehended in thofe general rules, of loving our neighbour as otirfelves, and of doing to others as we would have them do to us, there is nothing but what is moll lit and reafonable. 1 illaifcn.— This precept will oblige us to...
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Elegant extracts, Volume 55

Elegant extracts - 1816
...the Advantages of Society. From the two grand principles of " loving our neighbour as ourselves, and of doing to others as we would have them do to us," which regulates our social intercourse in general, we proceed to those more confined duties, which...
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Sermons, Addresses, and Letters

Isaac Stockton Keith - Congregational churches - 1816 - 448 pages
...which it gave us, we could not think of enjoying as exclusively our own, but have, on the principle of doing to others, as we would have them do to us, liberally shared with several of your good friends here, by allowing them the perusal of it l and *they...
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A Solemn Review of the Custom of War: Showing that War is the Effect of ...

Noah Worcester - Pacifism - 1816 - 32 pages
...of empire before us. It is for us to learn wisdom from their mistakes. The ancient and solemn rule of doing to others as we would have them do to us, when resolutely and constiir.lly observed, would be a much stronger guarantee of our future peace and...
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The Pamphleteer, Volume 7; Volume 12

Abraham John Valpy - Great Britain - 1818
...supersede the necessity, nor equal the efficacy, of a constant attention to that admirable precept of doing to others as we would have them do to us. In this free and civilised country, all who receive a liberal education are supposed to extend their...
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Remarks on a Course of Education: Designed to Prepare the Youthful Mind for ...

Thomas Myers - Education - 1818 - 10 pages
...supersede the, necessity, nor equal the efficacy, of a constant attention to that admirable precept of doing to others as "we would have them do to us. In this free and civilised country, all who receive a liberal education are supposed to extend their...
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Twenty Discourses on the Most Important Subjects: Calculated for Every Class ...

John Tillotson - Sermons, English - 1820 - 330 pages
...justice and charity, comprehended in those general rules of loving our neighbour as ourselves,' and of doing to others as we would have them do to us ; they enjoin nothing but what is most reasonable and fit to be done by us; nothing but what, if we...
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