Dynastic Crisis and Cultural Innovation: From the Late Ming to the Late Qing and Beyond

Front Cover
Dewei Wang, Wei Shang
Harvard University Asia Center, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 620 pages
0 Reviews

This volume addresses cultural and literary transformation in the late Ming (1550-1644) and late Qing (1851-1911) eras. Although conventionally associated with a devastating sociopolitical crisis, each of these periods was also a time when Chinese culture was rejuvenated. Focusing on the twin themes of crisis and innovation, the seventeen chapters in this book aim to illuminate the late Ming and late Qing as eras of literary-cultural innovation during periods of imperial disintegration; to analyze linkages between the two periods and the radical heritage they bequeathed to the modern imagination; and to rethink the "premodernity" of the late Ming and late Qing in the context of the end of the age of modernism.

The chapters touch on a remarkably wide spectrum of works, some never before discussed in English, such as poetry, drama, full-length novels, short stories, tanci narratives, newspaper articles, miscellanies, sketches, familiar essays, and public and private historical accounts. More important, they intersect on issues ranging from testimony about dynastic decline to the negotiation of authorial subjectivity, from the introduction of cultural technology to the renewal of literary convention.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Late Ming and the Early Qing
9
Pedagogy and Pedants
25
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Shang Wei is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at Columbia University.

Bibliographic information