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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. Brigadier-General WILLIAMS:

Two battalions of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, Colonel Seward, accompanied General Ricketts. One battalion remains here attached to Artillery Brigade, of 550 men. One hundred and seventy-one are familiar with the artillery drill. We know nothing of those who have gone, but presume that the proportion is about the same.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. (Received 9.30 p. m.) Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Report for to-night: The remaining battalion of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, of General Ricketts' division, have been ordered to City Point and Washington. I am expecting notice every moment that they have started, and have notified General Ingalls of the number of men. Some delay was caused by the command being so much separated, one company being in charge of the mortars at the ammunition train; about sixty men scattered amongst battery and artillery guards at the different trains and hospitals.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864—9 a. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

Nothing has occurred worthy of report during the past twelve hours. The firing was quite sharp on front of Second and Third Divisions.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864–5.35 p. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

An artillery duel seems to have commenced on Smith's front and extended to mine. There were some little musketry, but nothing of moment apparently. Will have more definite news presently.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major General. (Copy to General Warren.)

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864-9 p. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

I have the honor to report that everything has been quiet on my lines to-day up to 5 p. m., when artillery and infantry firing from the rebel lines, commencing on General Sunith's front, swept down my lines. The enemy did not leave their works. It lasted about half an hour. No damage done.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, Va., July 8, 1864–8 a, m. Lieut. Col. LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Ninth Army Corps : COLONEL: I have the honor to report that nothing occurred in my front last night. The sharp picket-firing heard during the night was beyond my left. One of my brigade officers of the day reports that about day break the enemy were very busy, apparently, in the movement of troops, and that cars were running more than usual. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H, LEDLIE, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1861. Major-General PARKE,

Chief of Staff: GENERAL: I have the honor to report no change of much consequence on my line during the night. In front of the right of my line the firing was more severe than it has been for some time. Roemer got three pieces into position and will have the fourth in in a short time. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

0. B. WILLCOX, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, July 8, 1864. Colonel RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General: Have received instructions to report to Ninth Army Corps for duty with my battery. Shall leave this place early to-morrow morning.

E. R. MAYO, Captain, Commanding Third Maine Battery.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1861–6.15 p. m. Major-General SHERIDAN,

Commanding Cavalry Corps : The commanding general instructs me to inquire what will be the earliest day at which your command will be in condition for service, and the number of officers and men you will then have available. It is important that he should know this, and also that your corps should be made available at the earliest practicable moment. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. Col. GEORGE H. CHAPMAN,

Commanding Second Brigade: COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you send one regi. ment from your brigade at 6 a. m. to-morrow to Cocke's Mill, on the road from Fort Powhatan to Prince George Court-House, with three days' rations and forage; the regiment to picket the roads in that vicinity, the commanding officer to send in written report early every morning. I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. SIEBERT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 8, 1864—8.10 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Your letter* to General Lee was received by me and duly forwarded, being received by Lieutenant Bolling, of the Ninth Virginia Infantry, at about 7.30 p. m., who promised that should at once be forw to General Lee.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 8, 1861. Major-General BUTLER,

Commanding, &c. Is it not practicable for you to send a brigade of troops from the peninsula between the Appomattox and James to General Smith? His line is so long and exposed that it is necessary to relieve the men in the trenches.

U.S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,
Broadway Landing, on Appomattox River, Va.,

July 8, 1864–8 ll. m.
Brigadier-General RAMSAY,
Chief of Ordnance, U. 8. Army, Winder Building,

Washington, D. C.: I think from present appearances that several more 8-inch mortars will be needed, probably with only short notice. May it not be well to have them in readiness for prompt shipment? Also some 10-inch mortar shells, of which we have only 2,675 on hand.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

Broaducay Landing, Va., July 8, 1864-10,30 a. m. Brigadier General RAMSAY, Chief of Ordnance, U. 8. Army, Winder Building,

Washington, D), C.: I have just received orders to apply for more 8-inch mortars. Please forward to Capt. S. P. llatfield, First Connecticut Artillery, care of Captain Pitkin, depot quartermaster, City Point, twenty more 8-inch mortars with platforms, implements, and equipments complete, with 1,000 rounds per mortar, with as little delay as possible. I have now only two noi in position. Please acknowledge receipt of this telegram.

* See p. 74.

6 R R-VOL

L, PT IN

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, July 8, 1861. Col. H. L. ABBOT:

Telegram received; 7-inch mortars and beds ordered to Fort Monroe; 4,000 10-inch mortar shells at Fort Monroe will be sent if necessary.

GEO. D. RAMSAY, Brigadier-General and Chief of Ordnance.

SMITI'S HEADQUARTERS,

July 7, 1861. Colonel ABBOT,

First Connecticut Artillery: Send as soon as possible to Major Trumbull six 8-inch mortars for use on this front.

WM. F. SMITH, Major-General, Commanding.

JULY 8, 1861–7.20 a. m. Brigadier General IIUNT,

General Meade's Headquarters : General Smith has directed me to send, as soon as possible, six 8-inch mortars to bis front. Of course I shall await instructions from you betore doing so.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

July 8, 1864–7.20 a. M. Maj. Gen. W. F. SMITH,

('ommanding Eighteenth Army ('orps : I have notified General Hunt that you have directed me to send six 8-inch mortars to your front and await his orders. Ile has given me positive order's not to forward guns without his authority for so doing.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864–8.30 a. m. Colonel ABBOT:

Send the six mortars to Colonel Burton, with ammunition. Would it not be well to ask for more & inch mortars and shell? We will require many mortars for the work before us.

IIENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

July 8, 1861–9.10 a. m. Brigadier-General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac: Dispatch received. Will send mortars to-day and make requisitions for twenty more at once. This order leaves me only two on hand.

HENRY L, ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

July 8, 1864–9.10 a. m. Major-General SMITH,

Commanding Eighteenth Corps : Have received orders to forward six 8-inch mortars to you. Please notify me when the battery, including magazine, is ready, so that my train may not be delayed. I have no surplus transportation.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS GENERAL SMITH,

July 8, 1864. (ol. H. L. ABBOT: Please send the mortars to-day; your train will not be detained.

H. S. BURTON, Colonel and Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY,

July 8, 1864—10 a. m. Maj. T. S. TRUMBULL,

General Smith’s Headquarters : The six 8-inch mortars will start to report to you in about four hours. I have relieved the platoon of Company G, commanded by Lieutenant Sargeant, now in charge of General Burnside's mortar battery, by Company A, and ordered it to report to you for duty with these new mortars, as soon as relieved. Company A starts at once. Please see that there is a good magazine ready as soon as possible for the new battery.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

July 8, 1861–7.30 a. m. Capt. A. MORDECAI,

General Butler's Headquarters . Please notify me when the 13-inch mortar, with car, implements, equipments, and ainmunition complete, is ready to start for Petersburg. I have a detail ready to move at once with it.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

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