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have that many ready to start to me the instant I telegraph for them? If you can at the same time send horses for the guns it would be best. I do not like to venture my battery horses, for we may be called on to use them at a moment's notice. Please let your quartermaster, if you can, send horses and wagons in case they are wanted.

A. PIPER, Colonel and Chief of Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1861-12 m. Colonel PIPER,

Chief of Artillery, Eighteenth Corps : I will keep eleven wagons and three teams constantly ready for Captain Dow's material, subject to your telegram. I shail also have other transportation generally in park for the rest, or part of it, and can always inform you of the amount. I think Captain Dow's mantlets had better be sent back. I will send for them if desired.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—9.30 a. m. Captain BROOKER,

Commanding Siege Battery near Warren's Headquarters : (Through his Telegraph Operator.) Captain Pierce must gouge out the fuse plugs of his filled shells in some way, if possible. Only abandon and bury them as a last resort. By careful cutting I think he may safely try it.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-9.30 a. m. Captain BROOKER:

Tell Captain Pierce to bore out his fuse composition and fill his shells with water as one resort, better than leaving them.

H. L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-9.45 a. m. Captain Epson,

Ordnance Officer at Fort Monroe: Please retain all ammunition coming to Fort Monroe for my train (except Coehorn mortar) until hearing from me again.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

BURNSIDE'S HEADQUARTERS, July 31, 1864-10 a. m. Lieut. B. P'. LEARNED,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General : I have succeeded in getting transportation that will take to the landing the two siege batteries; their ammunition will be moving soon, Captain Gillett will get out at dusk. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. F. BROOKER,

Captain, &c.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. Colonel ABBOT:

In case siege mortars or guns remain here, wbat shall I do regarding the detachments? Shall the ordnance be turned over to other troops ?

THOS. S. TRUMBULL,

Major.

BROADWAY LANDING, V'A., July 31, 1864—12.15 p. m. Major TRUMBULL,

Commanding Siege Batteries, Eighteenth Corps : I have never for a moment designed to relieve our companies without their guns. Do not take anybody's order for such a proceeding except mine.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864-1.30 p. m. Col. H. L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Train : Everything that has not already reached you is in transit, or being loaded up, excepting from Gillett's battery.. Captain Brooker will remain until this evening, when that will all be moved.

NELSON L. WHITE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Convecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1861. Colonel ABBOT:

The thirteen wagons of 44-inch ammunition and Coehorns have just started for Broadway Landing.

THOS. ALLCOCK.

Lieutenant-Colonel, die.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1864. (Received 2 p. m.) Colonel ABBOT:

I am loading eight wagons from my own train with the 44-inch ammunition from Castle Hell

. All the siege materials on the Fifth Corps line except the above have started.

THOS. ALLCOCK, Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth New York Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. Colonel ABBOT:

I have sent Captain Osborne with the 13-inch mortar to City Point by rail. Will you communicate further orders to him?

T. S. TRUMBULL,

Major.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1864. (Received 8.35 p. m.) Colonel ABBOT:

Have you a good and short road to City Point! Have you received orders to load your siege materials on the vessels? Had you not better telegraph to City Point for instructions on the subject? The orders

send it all to City Point. It is just possible they want it there and do not want it shipped. I fear General Ord has stripped himself too bare of heavy guns.

H. J. HUNT, Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

were

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864–8.35 p. m. Brigadier-General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac : I received orders from General Grant to keep my train afloat, except what was in use, and upon this authority have been loading as fast as possible. I am satisfied that this is what is now desired, from a remark made to one of my officers in relation to the 13-inch mortar, but will telegraph as you desire. There is a good road to City Point. General Ord has retained in position of my train three 30-pounder Parrotts, ten 8.inch mortars, and sixteen Coehorns, which makes his line very well secured with his light batteries, in my judgment. My gun carriages are merely run on barges, not put in the hold, and can be very rapidly uploaded. We have done wonders in the way of moving and loading the train. Everything is exactly as I desire in this respect.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-8.10 p. m. Colonel BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Armies in the Field, City Point: General Hunt suggests that I notify you that I am loading my train as rapidly as possible at Broadway Landing, this being my understanding of my orders. It can be unloaded faster than it can be put in position, as I do not take the carriages apart. By morning everything not required by General Ord will be here and nearly afloat. Please notify me if this is what you desire.

46 R R-VOL XL, PT III

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Comdg. Siege Train.

City POINT, VA., July 31, 1864. Colonel ABBOT,

First Connecticut Artillery: You have done right. General Grant will return during the night, and his further directions will be telegraphed to you in the morning.

T. S. BOWERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff: The enemy would not receive flag of truce with prisoner without permission from General Lee. They have sent to him and I am waiting for reply.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General, Per J. C. B[RISCOE).

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1861. Major DAVIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General: The Confederate officer refused to receive the letter and I have retained the prisoner. My staff officer explained that it was a communication touching the prisoner taken under peculiar circumstances and returning him. Ask the major-general for instructions.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General,

HDQRS. DEPT, OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, (July 31}, 1861. Major-General BIRNEY:

It is all right. Turner's men are being recalled from the City Point road and will come to you.

ED. W. SMITH, Assistant Adjutant-General.

· HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonel SMITH:

Please inform the major-general that I have halted the division till 5 or 6 p. m. just this side of pontoon bridge. Three men have died from sunstroke, and thirty ambulances were unable to carry the men who have dropped by the wayside from the effects of the sun. Respectfully,

JNO. W. TURNER, Brigadier General, Commanding.

DEEP BOTTOM, VA., July 31, 1864. Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff: I have sent to you, through corps headquarters, a list of troops now on my front obtained this a, m. from different deserters, whose stories substantiate each other. I also forwarded to corps headquarters a Richmond paper of the 29th, containing some interesting items. All quiet.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS U, S. FORCES,

Fort Powhatan, Va., July 31, 1864. CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER TENTI ARMY CORPS:

Chief surgeon of this post reports over 200 men sick, and fifty of them should be sent away in order to preserve life, having only one single hospital tent, the balance of the covering nothing but pine brush, and in case of a rain the most of these sick will be without protection. Please send me a hospital boat immediately so that I can send them to Fortress Monroe. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. S. INNIS, Colonel 133d Regiment Ohio National Guard, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. (Received 12.30 a, m.) General WEITZEL: Dispatch received,* and will be carried out as soon as possible.

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1861–1.45 a. m. General WEITZEL:

Having but one division for my whole line, my other divisions were left with General Burnside; it will take till daylight to relieve from my trenches Turner. If cars can be sent me the move can be hastened.

E. 0. C. ORD,

Major-General, Commanding. * See Weitzel to Ord, 11 p. m., p. 687.

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