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These orders General Foster must carry out. The cominanding general directs that Foster keep enough pontoon-boats on the east bank of the river below Four-Mile Creek to enable his small garrison to withdraw in case of necessity, the gun-boats covering the movement. Very respectfully,

G. WEITZEL, Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.

(Copy to General Foster.)

HEADQUARTERS TENTI ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General WEITZEL,

Acting Chief of Staff: Officer of the day reports distinct hearing of sounds resembling loading of cars with railroad iron and moving of train to Richmond; also that the force in front of General Ferry is apparently much reduced.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major General. P.S-I go to Deep Bottom to-day.

D. B. B.

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS,

July 29, 1864-12.10 a. m. General R. S. FOSTER:

General Grant says he will send full instructions in the morning. That one division of infantry, only withdraws; the cavalry remains.

G. WEITZEL, Brigadier General and Acting Chief of Staff'.

(Copy to General Birney.)

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST Div., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Deep Bottom, Va., July 29, 1864. Lieut. Col. E. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Tenth Army Corps : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the dispatch of July 28 from the major general commanding Tenth Army Corps, in answer to my request for instructions. The only instructions that I received were previous to the expedition, and from Major-General Butler, to the effect that I was to cross and hold this position at all hazards until the bridge was completed, after which time I was to repel force by force, keeping headquarters well informed of what transpired. I was told verbally that such re-enforcements as were deemert necessary to hold the position would be sent me. I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. FOSTER, Brigadier: General, Commanding.

JULY 29, 1864—8 p. m. Brigadier-General FOSTER:

DEAR SIR: As you have already learned, General Hancock has been ordered to move in another direction. This will leave a vastly superior force in your front, which may, probably will, attempt to assault your works and to carry them by superior numbers. In a military sense, the worth of a post is only what it may cost the enemy to take it, as it is axiomatic that all posts and garrison places may be taken at some cost. Now, then, you will have, if the rebels attack you, a gallant defense. Make it cost them all your post is worth. A good defense, even with loss, is better than an attempted retreat. Surrender I know you never will. Nay, more, you will lose less men in a defense, however protracted and deadly, than you will in a retreat. If they do attack you, every moment you hold out costs them hours on the left, and aids General Grant's movement in the most essential manner. You can and will hold them, and for your courage and conduct I shall be most happy to bear the fullest testimony. Truly, yours,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

DEEP BOTTOM, VA., July 29, 1864. Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps : GENERAL: I am to be left alone here after the withdrawal of your forces, and will doubtless be subjected to an attack in force by the enemy some time to-morrow. It is necessary for me to do some more intrenching on this side and to furnish a heavy detail to build the second pontoon bridge to-night, besides rebuilding the one that conne ts my post with the opposite side of the river after it has been used by your troops. I have, therefore, the honor to ask you if you will order a detail from your troops to demolish the line of intrenchments outside of the oak tree, and one, also, to strengthen and raise the parapet of the small inner line, which I propose to hold as long as I can. If you can furnish me the assistance I will be very much indebted to you. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. FOSTER, Brigadier General, Commanding U, S. Forces, Deep Bottom, Va.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General FOSTER,

Commanding, dc.: GENERAL: The enemy are now advancing on my extreme right; I do not know with what force. I will cheerfully do what you desire, except that my troops may not be permitted to remain here long enough. I would like to see you at dark and then we can decide the matter. I think, however, you had better be prepared to perform the work in case I cannot. Your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

July 29, 1864—7.10 p. m. General FOSTER,

Commanding at Deep Bottom: GENERAL: General Hancock directs me to say that the brigade of the Nineteenth Corps now here will hold the bridge-head. He has already ordered details from it for fatigue if required. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. A. WALKER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

FOUR-MILE CREEK, July 29, 1864. Colonel MORGAN,

Chief of Staff, Second Corps : COLONEL: There is nothing new in my front. Everything quiet, except some little picket-firing. Nobody hurt. Enemy still strengthening his works, but makes no demonstrations. Does the general wish me to stir them up a little with my batteries? Yours,

H. W. BIRGE,

Brigadier General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864—3.45 p. m. General BIRGE,

Commanding Brigade, Nineteenth Corps : GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that he has been advised by Lieutenant-General Grant that the enemy are moving in this direction in considerable force. He wishes you to be very watchful, but still maintaining a threatening attitude. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 29, 1864. Major-General ORD,

Eighteenth Corps : The commanding general directs me to say to you that he has ordered Brig. Gen. J. B. Carr to report to you for duty. He suggests that he be placed in command of one of the brigades of Stannard's division. Respectfully,

G. WEITZEL, Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General MEADE:

General Mott reports with 4,500 men. I have had about 6,000 in my trenches. Will it answer to man them with Mott's division until Hancock comes? Shall I direct Mott with his limited force to assault? I tbink he runs some risk in doing so, especially as the enemy's entanglements and our deep trenches would cause delay in the execution.

E. 0. C. ORD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1861–2.30 p. m. Major-General ORD:

Let Mott relieve your corps, but let him await orders for assaulting from Hancock, who will be up in time to give them, even if all his corps is not. Hancock will be ordered to move up in rear of Mott, and hold his corps in readiness for immediate action.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864–9.25 p. m. General MEADE:

General Mott and division have just passed my headquarters going to the front. At this rate it will be midnight, perhaps, before my troops can march to Burnside's, and it will take some three hours to relieve his men from the trenches and form them. I gave my orders as st as received.

E. 0. C. ORD.

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1861–9.45 p. m. Major-General ORD,

Commanding Eighteenth Corps : Your dispatch of 9.25 p. m. is received. The commanding general does not consider it necessary for General Burnside to wait for your troops to relieve his in the trenches. General Burnside can form his troops for the assault without reference to yours, and your troops can file into the trenches at any time after they are vacated. General Burnside is telegraphed to that effect.

A. A. IIUMPHREYS, Major General and Chief of Staff

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General BURNSIDE:

I am afraid there will be some delay in getting my division into your trenches. Mott has to relieve Carr, a new general. Carr has to get his people together and find his place, and then your people get their positions, all after dark. I will try to have Carr report as he nears you, but one of your officers ought to be with Carr.

E. O, C, ORD.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General ORD:

I think your divisions will be up in ample time. Let each commander stop at my headquarters as he passes and I think all will be right, and so you will push them past as fast as possible.

A. E. BURNSIDE, Major-General, Commanding.

IIEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1861–10.25 p. m. General BURNSIDE:

Between 12 and 1 o'clock, I think, before all reach you. The colored troops have partly started, under Colonel Ames.

E. (. C. ORD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864—11.15 p. m. General MEADE:

General Turner has started. Stannard's division, now with Carr, will start in a few minutes. Carr has left to report to you in person. Ames will follow Turner and camp near him.

E. 0. C. ORD,

Major-General. (Same to General Burnside.)

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

July 29, 1864. General HUNT,

Chief of Artillery, Armies near Richmond: The orders are all right. Have had them carried out. Better tell Warren to have bis rifles and sharpshooters on the watch to give enemy a blizzard when they raise up to see the burst.

ORD.

ORDERS.) HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 29, 1864. I. General Mott, with his division, having reported for the purpose, will, as per instructions, relieve the troops of the Eighteenth Corps, now occupying the trenches or in reserve, under Generals Turner, Ames, and Stannard, including the part of the Third Division, Colored Infantry, which has just been assigned to General Carr—this to-night as soon as it is dark enough to move without being seen by the enemy.

II. General Carr will give directions to the First Division (Stannard's) to fall far enough to the rear to march with safety, and proceed by the nearest route to the place in trenches, now occupied by Burnside's corps, to which they may be assigned. A staff officer will be sent to General Burnham to show him where to take the division.

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