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IIDQrs. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1861–11.55 4. m. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT, City Point:

Another large force of cavalry was passing up the turnpike at the Junction at 11.10 a. II.

This is in addition to all previous reports.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1864—12.20 p. m. Lieut. Gen. U.S. GRANT, City Point:

Eight hundred cavalry and forty wagons and ambulances passed the Junction on the turnpike toward Richmond, at 11.30 a. m., since last report. Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major General. (Forwarded to General Meade at 1 p. m.)

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

July 29, 1861–1 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT: The following is reported from signal station:

SPRING HILL SIGNAL STATION, July 29, 1864–12.35 p. m. Captain Norton:

Twenty-six baggage wagons have just passed on turnpike near railroad junction, going toward Richmond.

SIMONS, Lieutenant and Signal Officer. BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 29, 1861--2.15 p. m. General U. S. GRANT, City Point:

The following dispatch has just been received: : Seven cars, with passengers, and twelve wagons just passed the Junction toward Richmond. Very respectfully, &c.,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 29, 1864. Major General BUTLER,

Commanding, &c.: The main object of the expedition north of the James River having failed, by reason of the very large force thrown there by the enemy, I have determined to try and take advantage of the diversion made by assaulting at Petersburg before the enemy can get much of his force back there. As the assault must be made promptly on the return of our troops, and a night march being necessary to deceive the enemy, which will necessarily fatigue the troops to such an extent as to make their attack weak, I determined to withdraw one division of the Second Corps during last night, and with it relieve the Eighteenth Corps, so as to have all fresh troops for the first assault. The division which withdrew last night marched to the neighborhood of Petersburg. They will rest to-day and under cover of night take the place of the Eighteenth Corps. General Meade having studied all the ground over which the assault is to be made, and the Ninth Corps as part of his command having the advance in the assault, General Ord will report to General Meade for instructions during the assault. General Meade has received verbal instructions from me, and is now industriously engaged preparing the details. As soon as it is dark General Hancock will commence the withdrawal of the balance of his corps. The cavalry will follow the infantry. The former will reach Petersburg with all dispatch, and follow the assaulting column or place now occupied by the Eighteenth Corps as may be found advisable. The cavalry will make a forced march to the left of our present line, and be in readiness to move round the enemy's right. This movement will leave the garrison at Deep Bottom in presence of a vastly superior force. The navy will want to dispose of their vessels in such a manner as to sweep all the ground in front of our troops. I wish you would communicate with Captain Smith through a staff officer on this subject. Please caution him to make no changes through the day calculated to attract special interest on the part of the enemy. General Foster, I think, had better level the line of rifle-pits we captured from the enemy, and move his whole force to the side of the creek first occupied by him. The lower pontoon bridge should also be swung round to the west bank of the river. It may be advisable for General Foster to move his trains and surplus property to the west bank; but these details I leave to you. If possible I want to have our withdrawal from the north bank of the river concealed from the enemy until the attack commences at Petersburg. I have had General Ord informed verbally of the fact that he is to be relieved by the Second Corps, and is to form a part of the assaulting column. It only remains to notify him that during the assault he will receive orders from General Meade.

U, S, GRANT,

Lieutenant General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 29, 1864. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

City Point : Your dispatch received and attended to. General Ord has been directed to report to you for orders. Two more regiments of infantry crossed Chaffin's farm at 2.50 p. m., going west.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1861-2.25 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.: Between 11.50 a. m, and 12.45 p. m. thirty-four wagons have crossed the pontoon over the James River, going east. They moved toward the river from the Petersburg and Richmond turnpike by three different roads, and across Chaffin's farm by two roads. The following rebel message was sent from the ram to shore, viz:

I mean the skiffs that came down from Richmond yesterday p. m. Numbers 3 and 4 are mine, and you have sent No. 2. Is it not a mistake?

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

JULY 29, 1864. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Your instructions are quite clear and perhaps I ougat not to trouble you, but fearing that I may misunderstand I venture to ask a word of explanation. You say:

General Foster had better level the line of rifle-pits occupied by the enemy, and move his whole force to the side of the creek first occupied by him.

General Foster originally held two positions defended by works, one on the north side and one on the south side of the creek, the latter being held to prevent the enemy from commanding the former, which that position does. If Foster abandons the south side and places his whole force on the north side he will be overlooked by the enemy. By leaving a small force in the south work I think he can defend both positions better than one. We will leave some pontoon boats or the bridge, as the enemy cannot cross in face of the gun-boats. Is it your intention that we should literally obey the order or merely that Foster shall hold his old position if he can? If the latter, it may be telegraphed-hold the old position; if the former, obey instructions. Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, July 29, 1861–3 p. m. General BUTLER: If it can be done hold the old position.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1864--4 p. m. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

City Point: There is now a constant passing of troops across the river going west, with artillery in proportion. Foster has taken another deserter who reports all of Hill's corps, except one brigade, and part of Longstreet's corps, in his front at daylight, with orders to march at moment's notice. All quiet in this front.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, July 29, 1864–1.20 p. m. General BUTLER:

If practicable you will have another bridge thrown across the James at Deep Bottom for use to-night.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General,

JULY 29, 1864–4.30 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT :

In the opinion of the engineers another bridge south of the creek is impracticable because of the steepness of the bluff and the narrowness of the roadway along the bank of the creek. If it were, we have not the material to construct it. Shall send down to Deep Bottom, and if possible to do anything to aid crossing it shall be done. Lieutenant Michie has gone for the purpose. Shall Birge's brigade, of the Nineteenth Corps, leave Bermuda Hundred with Hancock, or shall it (remain) at Deep Bottom on this side the James to aid Foster or repel an attempt to cross?

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, July 29, 1864. Major-General BUTLER : General Benham is already on the way with another bridge.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

JULY 29, 1864–5.30 p. m. Major-General BUTLER :

Birge's brigade will remain at your disposal. I have sent word to General Benham about the bridge.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 29, 1864.

(Received 6 p. in.) General BUTLER :

General Benham has been directed to lay the bridge. Please direct Captain Lubey to select the point for laying the bridge and prepare the approaches at once. By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

JOHN A. RAWLINS, Brigadier General and Chief of Stat

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1861–6.55 p. i. Lieut. Gen. U. S, GRANT,

City Point: The following dispatch just received: The enemy's signal otficers report about 400 wagons to have crossed pontoor over Appomattox, going toward Berinuda Hundred.

G. S. DANA,

Captain, Signal Corps. Very respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General,

JULY 29, 1861–7 p. II. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Lieutenant Michie, of the engineers, telegraphs* that he is getting ready the approaches for another bridge at Deep Bottom, and that he can get it ready in four hours if Benham's train gets up in time, or if he takes up the upper bridge to Foster's camp). Had he better do the latter!

B. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 29, 1864–8.30 p. m. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

City Point: A rebel brigade just crossed the pontoon bridge at Chaffin's farm, going west. A heavily laden train just passed the Junction, going toward Petersburg. Respectfully, &c.,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

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IX. Brig. Gen. Joseph B. Carr, U. S. Volunteers, having reported for duty at these headquarters, is hereby assigned to the Eighteenth Army Corps, and will report in person to Maj. Gen. E. 0. C. Ord.

*

By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

See Michie to Weitzel, 7 p. m., p. 624.

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