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HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST Div., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Deep Bottom, Va., July 28, 1864—11.40 p. m. Brig. Gen. G. WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff*: The Second Army Corps commenced withdrawing, passing up Jones' Neck about 8.30 this evening. I have had no notice of their leaving from any official source, but know they are going, by seeing them pass my headquarters. Sheridan's cavalry is all back on Curl's Neck, and rumor says all are to withdraw to-night. If this is the case, the enemy, who are now very strong on this side of the river, will no doubt make a reconnaissance in force in the morning to ascertain their whereabouts, which will develop the fact that they have only my small force to oppose them, and if they should concentrate their forces against me it cannot fail to result in disaster to my command and the driving of the gunboats from the river at this point. I wish you would send me some de iled instructions wha course to pursue in ne event of a strong attack from the enemy's force after the withdrawal of the troops of the Army of the Potomac. Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General. (Copy to General Birney and to Lieutenant General Grant.)

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 28, 1864. General R. S. FOSTER,

Deep Bottom : You will be governed by your instructions previous to expedition of Second Corps. General Birge's brigade will doubtless remain for the present, and the two brigades, aided by the gun-boats, should hold the works against all forces enemy can bring.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPs,

July 28, 1861. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Picket officer reports three or more trains, double engines, loaded with troops as having passed north last night, a large portion of them taken from General Butler's front.

E. 0. C. ORD,

Major-General.

. HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTI CORPS,

July 28, 1864. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

City Point: Shall I discontinue the Coehorn firing? It is well I think to keep

it up.

E. 0. C. ORD, Major-General of Volunteers.

CITY POINT, VA., July 28, 1861.
Major-General ORT,

Commanding, cc.:
You may continue the Coehorn firing.

C. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

FORT POWHATAN, July 28, 1864. .Major-General BUTLER:

I have yet in my custody two hostages. They both say they are anxious to take the oath of allegiance. They pledge themselves to do all in their power to prevent the telegraph wire from being cut. They further agree to become answerable with their lives for the faithful performance of their obligations. Shall I try them?

G. S. INNIS,
Colonel, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 28, 1864. Colonel INNIS,

Fort Pouhatan : Yes; administer the oath to them all and try them. Both dispatches received.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS, DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,
No. 93.

Nerc Berne, N. C., July 28, 1864.
I. Companies I and M, Second Massachusetts Artillery, having
joined for service, they are assigned to the command of Brigadier-
General Harland, to whom the senior officer will report without delay.

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By command of Brig. Gen. I. N. Palmer:

J. A. JUDSON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, July 29, 1861.
Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, l’a..
I have changed my purpose, so that now I expect to reach Fort
Monroe at 10 a. m. Sunday, the 31st.

A. LINCOLN.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

City Point, Va., July 29, 1861. Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac: GENERAL: I have directed General Butler to order General Ord to report to you for the attack on Petersburg. The details for the assault

I leave for you to make out. I directed General Sheridan, whilst we were at Deep Bottom last evening, to move his command immediately to the left of Warren from Deep Bottom. It will be well to direct the cavalry to endeavor to get round the enemy's right flank. Whilst they will not probably succeed in turning the enemy, they will detain a large force to prevent it. I will go out this evening to see you; will be at your headquarters about 4 p. m. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General. P. S.--If you want to be any place on the line at the hour indicated inform me by telegraph, and I will meet you wherever you may be.

U. S. G.

City POINT, July 29, 1864—1.15 p. m. General MEADE:

I have not sent Butler's dispatches to General Hancock. If you have not sent them it will probably be well to send a summary of them. The enemy are evidently piling everything, except a very thin line in your front, to the north side of the river. Hancock was to be careful to have his command well in hand and a strong line to fall behind, where the gun-boats can have full play along his front. I have no doubt but he has taken these precautions, but it will do no harm to caution him. I am inclined to think the enemy will wait for us to attack unless they discover that we are withdrawing.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864—2.30 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I earnestly impressed on Hancock yesterday the necessity of occupy. ing a strong line, intrenching it, and preparing for a heavy attack to-day, which I deemed probable when the enemy had accumulated a heavy force. I have now sent him your telegram. Your note by Captain Hudson just received. Ord has been with me all the morning. We have been over the line and in conference with Burnside. I will be at my quarters at 4 p. m., it being about as near as any part of the line.

GEO, G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864--10 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The following intercepted rebel dispatches show Ingalls has made a strike:

JORDAN HOUSE–7.30 p. m. Capt. B. F. FISHER: “H. B. MCCLELLAN,

Assistant adjutant-General : “The wagons cross the pontoon over the Appomattox; then can't see them after they leave the pontoon, but from the dust I suppose they take the road for Bermuda Hundsed,

“N."

“6.20 1. M. "Colonel BRENT,

"Assistant Adjutant-General : “Sixteen wagons and fifty-eight ambulances have crossed the pontoon since last report; they have stopped crossing.

*N." T. R. CLARK,

Captain and Signal Officer. (Same to A. B.)

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

City POINT, VA., July 29, 1861.

Received 11 p. m.) General MEADE:

General Butler sent me an intercepted rebel dispatch* of an earlier hour than the one you stating that 400 wagons had crossed the pontoon bridge.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 29, 1864. Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Deserter from Tenth Florida, Finegan's brigade, came in at 9 o'clock last evening. Has no knowledge of position or movement of troops except in his own division (Mahone's); that Mahone's division is in the same position it has occupied for the past two weeks, excepting Wright's brigade, which moved day before yesterday. Informant thinks it went to the north side of the Appoiattox, but his information is founded on rumor. Cannot give any information of other divisions. Very respectfully,

J. C. BABCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 29, 1864–9.30 a. m. Colonel SHARPE:

From deserters we learn that Heth's division moved over the Appomattox yesterday about noon. Wright's brigade relieved it. Nothing further ascertained.

J. C. B[ABCOCK).

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 29, 1864. Maj. Gen. A. A. HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Deserter from Fourth Alabama, Law's brigade, of Field's division, Longstreet's corps, came into General Burnside's lines last

* See Butler to Grant, 6.55 p, m., p. 623.

evening about dark. He has just been forwarded here, and brings most important information. He states that last night about dark his entire division packed up and left the trenches, and were relieved by the division of Bushrod Johnson, which moved to the right and occupied the trenches vacated by Field's division; that he heard the Jieutenant of his company say they were going to Drewry's Bluff. They had not started when informant left, but had every preparation made. The surgeons had excused several for disability to march, and packing of baggage, rolling of blankets, &c., indicated an immediate move; orders were given to the entire division to move; that Bushrod Johnson said he thought he could not relieve the entire division,” and asked for a brigade of Field's division to be left behind. One of informant's company was standing by and overheard this from General Johnson. Informant thinks no brigade was left, but it was talked of leaving Anderson's or Benning's, they being smallest; that McLaws' division moved to the north side of the Appomattox night before last about 5 p. m.; understood that A. P. Hill's corps had moved, but cannot say how much of it, or where it had gone. Informant is certain that some troops were still left to the right of his division last night; thinks they might be some of Hill's corps. Informant's statement bears every evidence of truthfulness, and he is perfectly familiar with the organization of his division and corps. Think he is reliable. Very respectfully,

JOHN C. BABCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864—10.30 a. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

From the foregoing dispatch and other information it appears quite probable that Heth's division, Hill's corps, and Field's division, Longstreet's corps, have both left my front.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864. General RAWLINS, Chief of Staff, City Point:

In my report this morning of information brought from Richmond I omitted to state that our agent saw, day before yesterday, in Richmond, a considerable train of wagons, by which it was intended to send out of the enemy's lines and throw on our hands large numbers of women, children, and decrepit persons, said to be the families of persons who have fled to our lines or avoided the Confederate service. Respectfully,

GEO, H. SHARPE,

Colonel, &c.

CITY POINT, July 29, 1864. John C. BABCOCK, Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

Men in. Agent left Richmond yesterday at 9 a. m. Went in on Tuesday by Charles City road; saw very few troops; not allowed to

38 R R-VOL XL, PT III

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