Page images
PDF
EPUB

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1861–10,20 a. m. Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps : The cavalry picketing on the left report the enemy's infantry on the plank road near the junction of the road from Reams' Station, and that they were numerous in front of our pickets near the Gurley house. General Burnside has been ordered to send two brigades to occupy the intrenchments on your left from the plank road to the Norfolk road, and to picket the line from which Hancock's pickets were withdrawn yesterday. The commanding officer of the two brigades will be directed to report to you whatever occurs, as well as to these headquarters.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864—10.30 a. m. Major-General WARREN:

A report from General McIntosh, commanding cavalry on our left, announces the enemy's infantry in force on the plank road abreast of Lee's Mill, and the running of trains all night. My inference is that the disappearance of Hancock's corps has been mistaken for a raid on the Weldon railroad, and troops have been thrown to meet it. I now expect, when the real position of Hancock is known, they will try our left and rear.

I have ordered Burvside to send two brigades to occupy the works vacated on your left by Hancock.

GEO, G. MEADE,

Major General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1861–11.30 (l. m. General HUMPHREYS:

I have 1,900 men on working details to-day, which will considerably diminish the number I can count upon to send off suddenly to any other place. I think we should suspend the siege order for the present.

G. K. WARREN,

Major General.

[Indorsement.]

Major DUANE:
What are these 1,900 men working on?

A. 4. HUMPHREYS,
Major-General and Chief of Staff'.

TIEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864-12.15 p. m. Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps : General McIntosh, commanding cavalry brigade picketing on the left, reports that the statement made respecting 500 infantry on the plank road is entirely unfounded. That being so, as the siege-works going on are chiefly those for the secure approach to the batteries, the cominanding general thinks they might be continued.

A. A. HUMPHREYS. Major-General and Chief of Staff.

JIEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864—1 p. m. General HUMPHREYS: I transmit the following:

PICKET-LINE Turd DIVISION,

[July 27, 18641—3.10 p. m. General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps : GENERAL: The enemy having evacuated that part of their intrenchments east of the railroad near and east of the lead-works, the tents in that portion of the line were struck last night, and there is now no sign of occupation of that part of his works. Tents have been erected inside of the new fort east of the woods opposite the angle of my line. The officer in charge of the post at that point reports that he saw three trains just before sundown on the road near the vacated breast-works, and that they were runding all night, and that there was great noise and commotion. It is no doubt the fact that that portion of Hill's corps (Heth's) which occupied the enemy's works adjoining the railroad have left. The enemy's line at other points appears unchanged. A new camp udljoins the new fort. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. CRAWFORD,

Brigadier-Cieneral, Commanding. Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN, Major-General of Volunteers,

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864. Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General: GENERAL: There is one point in the transfer of Roy Stone's brigade from General Cutler's division to General Griffin's which controlled my action, but which is nevertheless so delicate a one that I have left it out of my previous communications. General Cutler makes a point of this transfer, but I did it because this brigade had not sustained its former good reputation, and its apologists laid all the blame on General Cutler. I transferred it and assigned Colonel Chamberlain to the command, an officer of the highest reputation. In our next engagement Colonel Chamberlain was wounded, and I have no report of its conduct on that occasion. I have kept up four divisions thus far as ordered, and always assigned the officers as I found them, on being assigned myself, according to their rank. My relation to each has, as far as I know, been harmonious, and I have forborne to state things which might not effect a positive change in position, and yet engender unpleasant relations. I wish the commanding general to be informed of the reason for my action with Roy Stone's brigade, and have no objection to General Cutler's knowing it, if it is necessary, or an act of injustice to him to withhold it. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. K. WARREN, Major-Cieneral of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864. Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS:

The regiments from Maryland, including the Purnell Legion, never were in any battle while they formed a part of the old First Corps. They joined it after the battle of Gettysburg and have adopted the badge of the Second Division of the Fifth Corps. Two brigades under General Crawford (Third Division) have adopted the combined badge of the First and Fifth Corps.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864. Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Army Corps : Your letter of the 26th instant, in reference to the reorganization of the Fifth Army Corps, has been received and laid before the majorgeneral commanding, by whom I am instructed to say in reply, that, as General Orders, No. 10, of March 24, 1864, from these headquarters, breaking up the First and Third Army Corps and transferring them to other corps, provided for the retention of their badges and distinctive marks, and justitied the expectation that the arrangment then made would be but a temporary one, and that the corps might hope at a future day to be reorganized, he is constrained to withhold his assent from any plan which looks to the distribution of the regiments composing the old First Corps among the divisions of the old Fifth Corps. He will, however, favorably consider a proposition reorganizing the present Fifth Corps into three divisions, provided the regiments of the First Corps, the Maryland regiments excepted, are all placed in one division. As the Maryland regiments did not join the First Corps until after the battle of Gettysburg, they may be arranged in your plan as you may think best. I am instructed to add that, if General Cutler desires service elsewhere, an application for such service will be forwarded to the headlquarters Armies of the United States, approved by the commanding general. Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1861–1.30 p. m. Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps : The dispatch* from General Crawford appears to be somewhat obscure. Can the officer on picket referred to see the railroad in the vicinity of the lead-works and the enemy's intrenched line from your front to the near vicinity of the lead-works? Is it intended to mean that all of Heth's division have left their intrenchments, and that their part of the line is now vacant, or is it merely a transfer of a part of Heth's division from the intrenchments near the lead-works to the new works of the enemy?

* See 3.10 p. m., p. 520.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

(Indorsement.)

Respectfully referred to General Crawford with original. Please return botli.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

JULY 27, 1864–1.30 p. m. General HUMPHREYS: I have referred your dispatch just received to General Crawford.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1861. (Received 7,40 p. m.) Lieutenant-Colonel LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General: Can I have a detail of 2,000 men, to report at General Cutler's head. quarters at 4 a. m. to the engineer officers present, 600 shovels, 400 picks, 100 axes? It would be preferable to have all the details from eaclı division consolidated and a commanding officer designated.

G. ,

Captain of Engineers.

JULY 27, 1864—7.50 p. m. Captain MENDELL:

Having rearranged my lines in order that they may be held with a smaller force, I have so much work to do that I am wable, at the best, to furnish more than 1,000 men for you.

G. K. WARREX.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864—9.40 p. m. Major-General IIUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff: In answer to your dispatch of 4.30 p. m. General Crawford sends me the following: HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, FIFTH ARMY CORPs.

[July 17, 1861]-9.20 p. m. General WARREN:

I returned from my lines late this afternoon. The officer on picket, and who has been on continuous duty for over ten days, reports from his daily examination that he can see the engines and recognize the distinct trains passing near the woods east of the lead-works. By night he sees the smoke-stacks of the engines and hears distinctly the trains passing. The enemy's works near the woods in the vicinity of tbe lead-works are distinctly visible. Their ocenpation yesterday morning was seen by myself and recognized by their tents, men passing, &c. From what bus been

learned from deserters and prisoners in the last ten days it is certain that Heth's division, or part of it, occupied these works and extended to the railroad, connecting on their left with Mahone's division in ny front. It cannot be told how much of Heth's division ocenpied the vacant works. It cannot be a transfer of a division or even a brigade to the new.work, which is in advance of a salient of the enemy's works, east of the vacant intrenchments, as the camp is too small, and the tents inside of the work are probably those of the artillery (three guns now visible) only. The railroad runs through the skirt of woods between the vacant intrenchments and the lead-works, and any train passing can be detected, and especially by night, from the angle of my picket-line. The deserter forwarded from these headquarters on the morning of the 26th instant from the Ninth Alabama, Sanders' brigade, Mahone's division, will probably give information on the subject. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. CRAWFORD, Brigadier-General, Commanding. G. K. WARREN,

Major-General

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864-9.30 7. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Is the contingency you desired me to prepare for in your confidential communication last night likely to take place to-morrow morning? Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN, Major General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1861. (Received 10 p. m.) General S. WILLIAMS:

I have the honor to report that nothing of importance transpired today in my front. Seven hundred men from First Division, 600 from Second Division, and 600 from Fourth Division have been at work today on my line.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1861–10.30 p. m. Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps : The contingency referred to is not likely to take place to-morrow morning, nor even to-morrow.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major General and Chief of Statt.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864. General WARREN:

I have six batteries (twenty four guns), of the Sixth Corps, camped near Hancock's headquarters. Have sent an officer to look at the ground near the left redoubt on Norfolk road and the approaches.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General,

« PreviousContinue »