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own regiments had been there this would not have occurred, and I consider its falling back unnecessary. I have sent over the Eleventh Maine to hold the line. I think the enemy are intrenching on the New Market and Malvern Hill road.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

DEEP BOTTOM, July 26, 1861–6.10 a. m. Lieutenant-Colonel SMITH:

This morning the enemy forced back my picket-line below Four: Mile Creek, and a point where we have no command of the woods or New Market or Malvern Hill roads. I have ordered another regiment over from here and shall try and retake the line from a point where I can command them. I have ordered two regiments of the Nineteenth Corps on this side of the creek, and will try and work them in with my men. I have virtually no stronger force than before these re-enforcements came. Numbers of the Nineteenth Army Corps are reported as captured when the line fell back last night, but I have not been able to get any details,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

JULY 26, 1864.

General FOSTER, Jones' Neck:

Was that portion of the line recovered?

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

HIDRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST Div., TENTH ARMY Corps,

Deep Bottom, July 26, 1861–8 a. m. Brig. Gen. G. WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff, Department of Virginia and North Carolina: I regret to say that I have not only not recovered that portion of the line lost last night, but through the shameful conduct of the troops of Colonel Currie's brigade have lost more. I can place no reliance at all upon them. Cannot they be withdrawn and some better brigade sent here! I have sent over the Eleventh Maine and Tenth Connecticut from my own brigade and shall recover all the line possible. The entire picket-line of the brigade of the Nineteenth Army Corps abandoned their line and fell back to the intrenchments at a slight skirmish fire of not over fifty shots. In re-enforcing that portion of the line, I have necessarily weakened greatly my line on this side of the creek.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 26, 1864. Brigadier-General FOSTER:

The firing heard is blank cartridge firing by colored troops. Have you ascertained your loss yet in falling back? Do you still hold crest?

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Deep Bottom, July 26, 1864–8.10 l. m. Maj. Gen. D, B. BIRNEY,

Commanding Tenth Army Corps : Your dispatch received. Owing to the shameful conduct of a portion of the brigade of the Nineteenth Army Corps here, who fell back to the intrenchments at a slight skirmish fire of not more than fifty shots, I lost the crest. I have sent the Eleventh Maine and Tenth Connecticut from my brigade on this side to try and retake as much as possible of the live, and have thereby weakened my own line. I can place no reliance in the brigade of the Nineteenth Corps under my orders. Respectfully, yours,

R. S, FOSTER,

Brigadier-General,

JONES' NECK, July 26, 1864. General WEITZEL:

Colonel Currie is as much annoyed at the conduct of his troops as myself. Thirtieth Maine were not on the picket-line. It was two New York regiments. They had the most explicit instructions from Colonel Currie, who even went so far as to tell them if they broke the troops in the rear had orders to fire on them. As near as I can learn about twenty men were captured; only one killed and one wounded. I have got two regiments there now that will get all they can, and, if possible, hold all they get.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

JONES' NECK, July 26, 1861. Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

Cannot you send me some more pick-axes? The ground where we are at work is very hard and requires almost as many picks as shovels.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier General.

HEADQUARTERS,

July 26, 1861. Brigadier-General FOSTER,

Jones Neck: I have ordered 100 picks to be sent you. I regret to hear what you communicate. It is of the highest importance to get that line back only for eighteen hours from now. I am surprised to hear about the conduct of those Nineteenth Corps troops. I don't know any troops available that would be better now. Those troops you have have been in as hot places, have fought as gallantly as any troops in the army. Colonel Currie, their commander, bears three honorable wounds, and is promoted for gallantry. He was Major-General Smith's adjutant-general all through the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. They have never fought a picket-line. Had they proper instructions to fight in a picket-line?

(. WEITZEL, Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff

HEADQUARTERS,

July 26, 1861. General WEITZEL:

Lieutenant Talcott, of the volunteer engineers, who is on my staff, says he requires about 1,500 sand-bags for revetting embrasures. ('an you send them?

R; S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

July 26, 1864.

General R. S, FOSTER,

Jones' Neck: Yes; they are ordered.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

DEEP BOTTOM, V A., July 26, 1861. Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

Does that party of which you notified me intend crossing the river at this point? If so, I will have the bridge covered to deaden sound.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 26, 1861–12.30 p. m. Brigadier-General FOSTER,

Jones Neck: That party will cross on both bridges. Muffle them both. Get that point this p. m. if you can, and hold it at least till that party arrives. It will arrive, I think, about 8 or 9 p. m.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

JONES' NECK, July 26, 1861. General WEITZEL:

Will you telegraph an order to department quartermaster at Jones' Landing to furnish hay and what teams he can spare. I will set details at work at once on muffling bridge.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

DEEP BOTTOM, VA., July 26, 1864. Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

Colonel Plaisted, Eleventh Maine, reports the picket-line below Four. Mile Creek re-established as it was the day Lieutenant Michie was over here. I shall try and regain the road this p. m.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General,

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Deep Bottom, July 26, 1861–5.15 p. m. Brig. Gen. G. WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina : The Eleventh Maine have taken a portion of the enemy's rifle-pits and now command with their muskets the New Market and Malvern Hill road, where the short cross-road strikes off to the Long Bridge road. They also command the enemy's battery, so that not a man can occupy it. They are about seventy-five yards this side of the road and about fifty yards from the battery. The enemy are in very strong force on the opposite side of the road, but have no protection in front at that point. Our loss in regaining this ground has been about fifteen killed and wounded. Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General. (Same to Major-General Birney.)

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the field, July 26, 1861. General FOSTER,

Jones' Neck:
Dispatch received. Good. Ilave told General Grant.

G. WEITZEL,
Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.

IIDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTII CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 26, 1861–9.30 7. M. General FOSTER,

Jones' Neck:
General Grant wants to know what is going on in your front.

Let us kuow when the columus reach your bridges and keep us poster of the progress of things as they occur. General Grant wants to be informed,

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier General.

IIEADQUARTERS L. S. FORCES,

Deep Bottom, July 20, 1861–9.15 p. m. Brig. Gen, G. WEITZEL,

Chief of Statt, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina : All is quiet on my front now. My pickets hold the same position is when I last informed you. About dark two regiments advanced on the extreme right of the picket-line below the creek, but were opened on by the artillery and picket-line and retired in haste. The columns have not yet arrived. General Sheridan is at my heariquarters. Í will keep you promptly posted on all that transpires. Respectfully,

R. S. FOSTER.

Lrigadier General. 32 R KVOL XL, IT III

HEADQUARTERS First DivISION, TENTI ARMY Corps,

In the Field, July 26, 1864. Brig. Gen. R. S. FOSTER:

In pursuance of instructions from corps headquarters, the brigadiergeneral commanding directs that the utmost vigilance be exercised on the lines to-night. Respectfully,

A. TERRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, I

No. 97.

IDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, Va., July 26, 1864.

II. The corps commander authorizes division commanders to order batteries which may be in position within their respective lines to open fire when, in the opinion of these commanders, the fire may be necessary. This authority extends to brigade commanders in the intrenchments, who are the immediate representatives of division commanders; but brigade commanders are cautioned against directing an unnecessary expenditure of ammunition, or a display of their force. It is very important to keep our numbers and positions, both of artillery aud infantry, concealed from the enemy, so that they may be tempted to attack, or we may be able, without their knowledge, to change our positions. This concealment is absolutely essential to success against so watchful a foe. The enemy frequently fire a few shots for the purpose of drawing a reply, and thus learuing the strength and position of our batteries. The gius in position must have the elevations and directions fixed for vight firing, and for use when it is necessary to silence a fire from the enemy. Should a battery of the enemy open, and if it is apparent that damage is being done to our own troops, the heavy batteries most conveniently located must endeavor to silence it. Hereafter, when batteries have occasion to fire, the commanding officers will on the next morning, before 9 o'clock, report in writing to the chief of artillery why and by, whose order, if by the order of any superior authority. An economical use of ammunition cannot be too strongly impressed upon artillery officers. A few shots well directed are better than a thousand tireil rapiilly and at randow,

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By command of Maj. Gen. E. (). C. Ord:

WM. RUSSELL, JR., Major an Assistant Adjutant General.

FORT POWIATAN, July 26, 1861. Brigadier General WEITZEL:

GENERAL: I have infantry for duty as follows: One hundred and thirty-third Regiment Ohio National Guard, 504 men; detachment Third Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, 79 men; Company L, First New York Volunteer Engineers, 59 men; total, 642 men. These are em ployed as follows: Heavy artillery ou fort and fortifications; 47 of engineers on fort and for the magazine; 120 men of the One hundred and thirty-third Ohio National Guard on guard and picket daily; 120

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